History of Western Civilization I – HIEU 201

CG • Section 8WK • 11/08/2019 to 04/16/2020 • Modified 04/08/2022

Course Description

A survey of the major currents in Western civilization from its beginnings in the ancient Near East to 1648.

For information regarding prerequisites for this course, please refer to the Academic Course Catalog.

Rationale

This survey course introduces students to political, economic, military, religious, and cultural developments of the ancient, medieval, and early modern periods that constitute the foundation for the modern West. It is a required prerequisite for upper-level courses in European history, and it may also fulfill a portion of the General Education requirement.

Measurable Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    1. Identify major figures and events in Western Civilization to 1648.
    2. Describe the stages of development of Western Civilization to 1648.
    3. Explain how political, economic, military, religious, and cultural factors influenced the development of Western Civilization to 1648.
    4. Demonstrate college-level competencies in reading comprehension, documentary analysis, research, and historical writing.
    5. Evaluate interpretive and historiographical approaches to Western Civilization to 1648.
    6. Apply biblical principles to the problems and issues of Western Civilization to 1648.

Core Competency Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    1. Apply Reading Comprehension strategies including interpreting, evaluating, and analyzing written content.
    2. Effectively compile a bibliography from online research.
    3. Integrate sources accurately and effectively.

FOUNDATIONAL SKILLS LEARNING OUTCOMES (FSLOs)

COMMUNICATION AND INFORMATION LITERACY

CIL 1: Discover and evaluate information to accomplish a specific purpose.

CIL 2: Communicate information effectively in the English language, orally and/or through writing, for a variety of purposes, using technology when appropriate.

CIL 3: Analyze and assess various forms of information and expression to determine their meaning, employing technology when relevant.

CIL 4: Demonstrate a basic understanding of the role of research and scholarship in order to apply it in various contexts.

CIL 5: Relate communication and information literacy to participation in God’s redemptive work.

CRITICAL THINKING

CT 1: Determine the validity and logical consistency of claims and/or positions, using reading comprehension strategies when relevant.

CT 2: Structure an argument or position using credible evidence and valid reasoning.

CT 3: Compare and contrast the biblical worldview with a non-biblical worldview, evaluating the influence of assumptions and contexts on ethics and values.

CT 5: Relate critical thinking and ethics to participation in God’s redemptive work.

CIVIC AND GLOBAL ENGAGEMENT

CGE 1: Identify the main features of a worldview, assessing the cultural, political, economic, and industrial implications.

CGE 5: Relate the human experience within various civic and global structures to participation in the redemptive work of God.

CHRISTIANITY AND CONTEXTS

CC 4: Articulate how faith in Christ and the theological worldview of Scripture shape one’s purpose for pursuing education, employment, relationships, and socio-cultural engagement, relating these pursuits to the redemptive work of God.

Course Assignment

Textbook readings and lecture presentations

Course Requirements Checklist

After reading the Course Syllabus and Student Expectations, the student will complete the related checklist found in the Course Overview.

Discussions (2)

Discussions are collaborative learning experiences. Therefore, the student will participate in two different threads by writing an initial thread of 300-400 words in response to the assigned topic. The student will then participate in discussion of the topic by posting a minimum of 2 responses, either to 2 different threads, or in combination with responding to questions/comments on his or her own thread. Responses will be a minimum of 100 words with no maximum. Threads will be open the entire week, and students are encouraged to participate throughout the time they are open. In addition to general comparison/contrast, students will be provided with opportunity for specific biblical evaluation of historical topics. Further details on requirements and grading are provided in the course. (CCO: A,B,C; FSLO: CIL 1,2,3,4, and 5; CT 1, 2, 3, 5; CGE 1 and 5; CC 4).

Evaluative Essay Assignments (2)

The student will write two essays on a chosen topic, reading and evaluating assigned sources in light of Scripture. The essays will be 750–1100 words and written in Turabian formatting. For the first essay, the student will also submit a thesis statement for review. Further details on requirements and grading are provided in the course.  (CCO: A,B,C; FSLO: CIL 1,2,3,4, and 5; CT 1, 2, 3, 5; CGE 1 and 5; CC 4).

Chapter Quizzes (15)

The student will take timed quizzes covering the content of the course textbook. Each quiz consists of 20 multiple-choice questions. There is a 40-minute time limit, and 2 attempts will be permitted with the higher grade counting for the final score in Canvas. (CCO: A,B,C; FSLO: CIL 1,2,3,4, and 5; CT 1, 2, 3, 5; CGE 1 and 5; CC 4).

Lecture Quizzes (8)

The student will take timed, weekly lecture quizzes that cover all lectures within the assigned module. Each quiz consists of 10 multiple choice questions. There is a 20-minute time limit for each quiz and only 1 attempt will be allowed for these quizzes. (CCO: A,B,C; FSLO: CIL 1,2,3,4, and 5; CT 1, 2, 3, 5; CGE 1 and 5; CC 4).