Juvenile Justice – CJUS 310

CG • Section 8WK • 11/08/2019 to 04/16/2020 • Modified 07/28/2020

Course Description

This course is designed to provide an in-depth study of the juvenile justice system in the United States. The student will study the general principles of juvenile delinquency, overview of the juvenile criminal justice system, theories of delinquency, and other issues dealing with juveniles in the justice system.

Prerequisites

CJUS 200 and 230

Rationale

Juveniles are accorded special status under the American legal system. Children and adolescents also account for a disproportionate amount of crime committed. Preventing such behavior and responding to its occurrence are matters of concern to society at large and to the criminal justice system in particular. This course will examine the historical precedents and philosophical reasons for treating juveniles differently from adults and review empirical evidence about child development that can illuminate the reasons for their special status within the system. Students will learn about the distribution of juvenile delinquency according to both official statistics and self-report data and learn about the impact of significant social and institutional influences on delinquency: family, school, peers, and drugs. The major theories that have been proposed as explanations of delinquent behavior will be reviewed and evaluated based on the research conducted to test each theory.

Measurable Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  1. Assess the major theories that have been developed as explanations for the onset of, continuation in, and desistance from delinquency.
  2. Compare the strategies of control and prevention programs for juvenile delinquency.
  3. Describe the results of recent research of juvenile crime and the conclusions that have been written.
  4. Apply biblical principles to the study of juvenile delinquency.

Course Assignment

Textbook readings and lecture presentations/notes

Course Requirements Checklist

After reading the Course Syllabus and Student Expectations, the student will complete the related checklist found in Module/Week 1.

Discussion Board Forums (8)

Discussion boards are collaborative learning experiences. Therefore, the student is required to submit a thread in response to the provided prompt for each forum. Each thread must be at least 300 words and demonstrate course-related knowledge. In addition to the thread, the student is required to reply to 2 classmates’ threads. Each reply must be at least 150 words.

Mindtap Excercises (28)

These assignments are online, interactive exercises offered through the textbook which will help students master the concepts in each chapter.

Research Paper

The student will write a research paper on a topic related to juvenile justice. The paper will be submitted in intervals as follows: Topic Selection, Outline, Rough Draft, and Final Draft.

Topic Selection

The student will select a topic related to juvenile justice from the provided list or choose a topic covered in the course textbook. The student must explain why he or she has chosen this topic in 1–2 sentences.

Outline

The student will provide an in-depth outline of his or her research paper. The outline must contain headings that correlate to the chosen topic.

Rough Draft

The student will submit a rough draft of his or her research paper that expands on the outline and addresses all sections thoroughly. The rough draft must be at least 5 pages (excluding the title page, abstract, tables of contents, reference list, and appendices), follow current APA format, and include at least 5 primary references and 5 biblical references.

Final Draft

The student will submit the final draft of his or her research paper. The final draft must be at least 5 pages (excluding the title page, abstract, tables of contents, reference list, and appendices), follow current APA format, and include at least 5 primary references and 5 biblical references.

Quizzes (3)

There will be 3 quizzes. Quiz 1 will cover chapters 1–6 of the textbook, Quiz 2 will cover chapters 7–12, and Quiz 3 will cover chapters 13–14. Each quiz will be open-book/open-notes, contain 40 multiple-choice and true/false questions, and have a time limit of 1 hour and 15 minutes.