APOL330: C.S. Lewis and the Apologetic Imagination

11/08/2019 to 04/16/2020 • Modified 02/01/2024

Course Description

This course examines the apologetic writings of C. S. Lewis. Particular focus is given to understanding Lewis within his context as well as drawing from various aspects of his apologetic approach for the current cultural moment.

For information regarding prerequisites for this course, please refer to the Academic Course Catalog.

Rationale

Apologetics involves an ability to meaningfully answer objections to the Christian faith. C. S. Lewis was a master at understanding and responding to the culture in which he lived. He provided sound reasons to believe in Christianity through both his fiction and non-fiction writings. Understanding and applying Lewis’ creative apologetic style helps enable one to share the truth of Christ and Christianity in the modern context.

Course Assignment

Textbook readings and lecture presentations

Course Requirements Checklist

After reading the Course Syllabus and Student Expectations, the student will complete the related checklist found in the Course Overview. 

Discussions (4)

Discussions are collaborative learning experiences. Therefore, the student is required to provide a thread in response to the provided prompt for each discussion. Each thread must be at least 500 words and demonstrate course-related knowledge. In addition to the thread, the student is required to reply to 2 other classmates’ threads. Each reply must be at least 150 words. Each thread must cite at least 2 scholarly sources in Turabian format, and each reply must cite at least 1 scholarly source in Turabian format. (CLOs: A, B, D)

The student will write a 1,000-word essay evaluating the temptation strategy of Uncle Screwtape in The Screwtape Letters.  The essay should utilize current Turabian format. For this essay, the student will cite support from a minimum of 2 different scholarly sources.  (CLOs: A, D)

The Moral Law Reflection Assignment

The student will write a 300-word reflection on Lewis’ Moral Argument and the implications of the moral law for one’s life. The essay should utilize current Turabian format. (CLOs:  A, B, D)

The Liar, Lunatic, or Lord Essay Assignment

The student will write a 1,000-word essay evaluating Lewis’ claim that Jesus was either a liar or a lunatic, or He was Lord.  The essay should utilize current Turabian format. For this essay, the student will cite support from a minimum of 2 different scholarly sources.   (CLOs A, B, C, D)

The Great Divorce Character Analysis Assignment

The student will write a 1,000-word essay examining Lewis’ view of human free will and how he develops this concept in various characters in The Great Divorce.  The essay should utilize current Turabian format. For this essay, the student will cite support from a minimum of 2 different scholarly sources.  (CLOs:  A, D)

Quizzes (4)

Each quiz will cover the Learn material for the assigned Module: Week. Each quiz will be open-book/open-notes, contain 25 multiple-choice and true/false questions, and be limited to 50 minutes. Each quiz allows 1 attempt. (CLOs:  A, B, C)

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