Science Educator Conference

Science Educator Conference

September 27-28, 2018

Start the school year with new and inspiring science lessons from Liberty University’s biology and chemistry professors who are experts in forensics, molecular biology, chemistry, microbiology, and more. You’ll learn practical teaching methods using the university’s state-of-the-art labs. With both high school and middle school tracks available, the conference can be tailored to fit your needs.

Registration

  • Registration includes the choice of Thursday or Friday sessions, lunch, and coffee for that day.
  • Choose and indicate which day you will attend and which track you will attend on that day.

Cost

  • One day registration (through August 31) - $125
  • Late registration (after August 31) - $150

General Conference Schedule

  • Registration | 8-8:30 a.m.
  • Session I | 8:45-10:15 a.m.
  • Coffee (provided) | 10:15-10:30 a.m.
  • Session II | 10:30 a.m.-12 p.m.
  • Lunch (provided) | 12-1 p.m.
  • Session III | 1:15-2:45 p.m.
  • Plenary | 3-4:30 p.m.
  • Closing | 4:30-5 p.m.

Session General Overview

Thursday Session Tracks

Middle School / Elementary school sessions focus on general biology content and hands-on ideas for the classroom. High school sessions focus on chemistry content with ideas for classroom and lab.

Elementary/Middle School
Topics include bird and feather structure and identification, and squid dissection

High School
Topics include fun ways to introduce and incorporate lab safety, identification methods for proteins and global water, energy and climate issues.

Friday Session Tracks

Elementary/Middle school sessions focus on physical science topics and ideas for demonstration or hands-on activities. High School sessions focus on biology content areas and ideas for lab experiments.

Elementary/Middle School
Topics include chemistry, earth science, and physical science content.

High School
Topics include genetics, cadaver dissection, and preparing students for science career content areas.


  • 2018 Presentations

    The following descriptions are of presentations for the 2018 Science Educator Conference.

    Elementary/Middle School Sessions

    "The Chromatographic Analysis of Pigments in Fruits and Vegetables" – Dr. Michael Korn
    Have you ever wondered how many different pigments make up the red color on red pepper? Is that the same dye as in tomatoes -- or red beets? These are some of the questions we want to answer in this workshop. Participants will extract the dyes from various fruits/vegetables and analyze them be chromatograph methods. Participants will receive materials to be able to do this in their classrooms.

    "Birds of a Feather" – Dr. Gene Sattler
    Feathers and flight in birds will be considered with respect to their external anatomy and internal physiology, with hands-on examination of feathers that participants can take back to the classroom and simple apparatuses that can be made to demonstrate aerodynamic principles.

    Finding the Magnitude and Epicenter of an Earthquake – Dr. Mark Tinsley

    "Which Way Will They Flow?" – Dr. Alan Fulp
    The principles that govern the movement of molecules will be discussed. A hands-on lab will be done that allows predictions of molecule movement based on the principles and visual confirmation of the movement. Materials that will allow the participants to do this as a class experiment or teacher demonstration will be supplied to the participant.

    High School Sessions

    "Anatomy of a Gene" – Dr. Gary Isaacs
    Understanding the various DNA components of a gene is vital to an integrated view of how mutations affect our genome. This course will enable instructors and students to identify key components of a gene that relates to mRNA production and protein formation. Moreover, the techniques described easily turn a visual representation of real-world genes from a lecture into a take-home project for students. Introduction to mapping a gene using free, online software, as well as a discussion for classroom application will be the main focus of our in-class time. Bring your laptop so we can go through examples together. Post-course follow-up is also available for the development of assignments for your specific objectives.

    "Cadaver Tour and Dissection" – Professor Abby Lawton
    Take a tour of the cadaver lab facilities and take part in a cadaver dissection.

    "To College and Beyond" – Dr. Mark Blaise
    Take a tour of our science facilities. Learn helpful and informative ways in which to prepare students for science undergraduate and graduate programs. 

    "Global warming and Other Hot Button Topics" – Dr. Michael Bender
    Many governments, global nongovernmental agencies, and major industries are increasingly calling for research and technology to be developed that will address the ongoing global issues related to water, energy, and climate (WEC). A significant fraction of our students are aware of this general class of issues and many may even have heart-felt personal concerns related to WEC issues. As such, instruction segments in science which emphasize and test ideas around WEC related issues are likely to increase the science IQ of our students while both addressing their personal interests and preparing them for future employment opportunities.

    This conference segment will illustrate experiments that will key into several WEC issues. Simple experiments will be outlined to allow students to explore CO2 emissions and greenhouse gas questions will be demonstrated. Further experiments related to microbead and microplastic contamination in natural waters/ocean gyres will also be demonstrated“. Finally, potential experiments and student prompts related to UV exposure and health risk will be discussed.

    "Plant Peroxide Isolation" –- Dr. Greg Raner
    Plant peroxidases have become an essential element in the biotechnology world, with applications in clinical diagnosis, environmental testing, and biosensory development. Horseradish peroxidase is by far the most utilized member of this family, but most vegetables possess peroxidase activities that can be easily isolated and analyzed. This conference discussion will highlight simple lab methods for extracting peroxidases from a variety of readily available garden vegetables and demonstrate methods for measuring activities that will highlight their prominence in biotechnological applications.

    "Elephant in the Lab; Creative bookends for Lab Safety Talks" – Dr. Nancy Richardson
    Explore fun ways to incorporate important safety features into lab time.

  • Past Conference Topics

    Elementary/Middle School Sessions

    "Fuzzy, with a Chance of Feathers: Taking a Fresh Look at Dinosaurs and Birds" – Dr. Marcus Ross

    "Demo Dissections for Students: Cow's Eye" – Dr. Davis McQuirt
    Participants will be shown how to dissect a cow's eye for demonstration purposes in their classrooms. Participants will be given a cow's eye to take with them and use in their classrooms.

    "Sometimes You Feel Like a Nut? A Classification of Fruits and Vegetables Lab" – Dr. Timothy Brophy
    Have you ever played the fruit or vegetable game with your students? How about the "Brophy Peel Test" for classifying berries? Did you know that peaches are mature flower ovaries and tomatoes have placentas? And what about that old candy bar commercial by Peter Paul, "Sometimes you feel like a nut? Sometimes you don't. Almond Joy's got nuts, Mounds don't." Did you know that it's all a lie? Learn about all these things and more with Dr. Brophy. There will be fresh fruits, vegetables, and flowers and easy to use take-home resources. You can even bring the leftover fruits and vegetables with you.

    High School Sessions

    "The Chromatographic Analysis of Pigments in Fruits and Vegetables" – Dr. Michael Korn
    Have you ever wondered how many different pigments make up the red color on red pepper? Is that the same dye as in tomatoes -- or red beets? These are some of the questions we want to answer in this workshop. Participants will extract the dyes from various fruits/vegetables and analyze them be chromatograph methods. Participants will receive materials to be able to do this in their classrooms.

    If You Are What You Eat, Who Are YOU?" – Dr. Brigitte Townsend
    This session will cover essential nutrients from a chemical standpoint. Using nutrition labels and common dietary myths, students will learn how the chemistry of nutrients impacts their body composition and long-term health. Students will be challenged to use this information to make conscientious nutrition choices. During this session, educators will be provided with handouts and easily accessible references that will enable them to engage their classrooms in this topic. 

    "Fungi: More than Mushrooms" – Dr. Mike Price
    In this session, you will learn the basics of fungal structure and growth. Both yeast and mold forms of fungi will be presented, and simple staining procedures for viewing fungi will be performed. Participants will receive materials to be able to conduct this lab in their classrooms.

    "Birds of a Feather" – Dr. Gene Sattler
    Feathers and flight in birds will be considered with respect to their external anatomy and internal physiology, with hands-on examination of feathers that participants can take back to the classroom and simple apparatuses that can be made to demonstrate aerodynamic principles.

    "Clinical Diagnostics in Anatomy and Physiology" – Dr. Ben Kalu
    Includes demonstrations and hands-on practice sessions with ultrasonography, EKG/EEG/EMG/HRV

    Plenary Session

    "Teaching for Worldview Impact" – Dr. David DeWitt
    Dr. David A. DeWitt is chair of biology and chemistry and has over 20 years of experience in teaching origins. In his session, he will share insights on how to impact students' worldviews.

 


Contact

Renae R. Bullock
(434) 592-4663
rrbullock@liberty.edu

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