Overview

Conflicts are inevitable, but they don’t have to be unresolvable. The Office of Community Life seeks to engage students who are experiencing conflicts to approach the conflict in a healthy and productive manner. By providing a list of tips for managing conflict and a checklist to evaluate your response to the conflict, Community Life equips and empowers you to find a resolution.

If a conflict continues to take place, Community Life is available to provide mediation for students.


 

TIPS: For Managing and Resolving Conflict

Managing and resolving conflict requires the ability to quickly reduce stress and bring your emotions into balance. You can ensure that the process is as positive as possible by following the guidelines. To keep yourself on track toward resolution, be sure to check the Conflict Resolution Checklist

  • Listen for what is said, and the emotions that are implied. By listening, you connect to your needs and emotions and to those of other people.

  • Make conflict resolution the priority rather than “being right.” Maintaining and strengthening the relationship, rather than “winning” the argument, should always be the most important thing. Be respectful of the other person and his or her viewpoint.

  • Focus on the present. If you’re holding on to grudges, your ability to see the reality of the current situation will be impaired. Rather than looking to the past and assigning blame, focus on what you can do now to solve the problem.

  • Pick your battles. Conflicts can be draining, so it’s important to consider whether the issue is worth your time and energy.

  • Be willing to forgive. Resolving conflict is impossible if you’re unwilling or unable to forgive. Resolution means releasing the urge to punish. After all, punishing can never compensate for losses.

  • Know when to let something go. If you can’t come to an agreement, agree to disagree. It takes two people to keep an argument going. If a conflict is going nowhere, you can choose to disengage and move on.