Hermeneutics – BIBL 715

CG • Section 8WK • 11/08/2019 to 04/16/2020 • Modified 01/31/2022

Course Description

An advanced course in hermeneutics with an emphasis in preparing the student to engage the biblical text for genre specific exposition. Content focuses on genre specific issues in the interpretation and application of the biblical text, including an examination of current interpretive approaches for primary and secondary literary genres.  Exposure to theoretical issues in hermeneutics and their practical ramifications for Bible exposition is given significant consideration.

For information regarding prerequisites for this course, please refer to the Academic Course Catalog.

Rationale

The foundation for biblical preaching is the discovery of meaning in the biblical text. In this course, students will approach the discipline of hermeneutics from a theological, biblical, historical, and practical perspective. These skills will help lay the foundation for the more specific courses to come later in the degree program.

Course Assignment

After reading the Course Syllabus and Student Expectations, the student will complete the related checklist found in Module 1: Week 1.

Discussions are collaborative learning experiences. Therefore, the student is required to provide a thread in response to the provided prompt for each discussion. Each thread must be 500 words and demonstrate course-related knowledge. In addition to the thread, the student is required to reply to one other classmates’ threads. Each reply must be 300 words. The real difference in PhD-level work is that discussions are student-led, rather than professor-led. In the discussion, you will be provide two options, and you will be responsible to answer one of them in depth. You will need to respond to at least one of your classmate’s responses to one of the questions, the professor's, yours (preferably, if you post a question), or another student’s. You are free to respond to more than one, and it is encouraged, since the more you interact, the more you are able to learn and grow. The PhD students lead the “class” as much as the professor does. It’s what helps set PhD studies apart from other levels of education. (CLOs: A, C, D, F)

The primary outcome of a PhD degree is the production of an original work of research of dissertation length. In the coursework leading up to that capstone project, students are given opportunities to build the skills necessary for a good dissertation. The research paper in this course, and its various components, are an exercise in honing those skills. The first required element leading up to the final draft of the research paper is the thesis sentence. This is a one-sentence description of the scope of your research paper. A good thesis sentence is essential to a good paper, for it gives the paper its shape and direction. The professor is able to review it and either approve it as-is for full credit or ask for a revision. (CLO: B)

The primary outcome of a PhD degree is the production of an original work of research of dissertation length. In the coursework leading up to that capstone project, students are given opportunities to build the skills necessary for a good dissertation. The research paper in this course, and its various components, are an exercise in honing those skills. The second required element leading up to the final draft of the research paper is the research outline. This is a document-in-progress that is submitted to show the progress of research. It outlines the shape and contour of your argument and can be as detailed as you wish at this point in your research. The professor is able to review it and suggest changes or additions toward making your paper better. (CLOs: C, D, E)

The primary outcome of a PhD degree is the production of an original work of research of dissertation length. In the coursework leading up to that capstone project, students are given opportunities to build the skills necessary for a good dissertation. The research paper in this course, and its various components, are an exercise in honing those skills. The third required element leading up to the final draft of the research paper is the research bibliography. This is a document-in-progress that is submitted to show the progress of research. It need not be (and should not be) identical to the final bibliography submitted with the research paper. It is intended to show the depth of your research up to the point of submission. The professor is able to review it and suggest changes or additions toward making your paper better. (CLOs: C, D, E)

The primary outcome of a PhD degree is the production of an original work of research of dissertation length. In the coursework leading up to that capstone project, students are given opportunities to build the skills necessary for a good dissertation. This assignment, the research paper assignment, is a helpful tool in a number of ways. First, it allows students to build research and writing skills. Second, it can be used as a contribution to the dissertation to follow. Third, it allows the student to take a deep dive into a narrow field of inquiry. Each of these helps to guide the student along the path toward his or her own publication later. In the first phase of the program, these skills are still in the process of being developed. This assignment serves as a good “trial run” of what will come later as the student advances further. Suggestion: If you know what your dissertation topic might be, tailor this paper to that and use it as a building block toward your dissertation. The topics given above are sufficiently open-ended to allow a great deal of flexibility. (CLOs: A, B, C, D, E)

Reflection Essay Assignment

This course serves as a transition from Phase One to Phase Two of the PhD in Bible Exposition. As the course comes to an end, so does Phase One. Therefore, it is good to pause and reflect. This assignment serves a dual purpose: to provide an opportunity for such reflection for the student and to allow some good constructive feedback for both the course and instructor. It allows the student to be able to see what has been accomplished and anticipate what lies ahead. (CLOs: A and D)