Undergraduate Catalog 2015-2016 [Archived Catalog] [Archived Catalog]

College of Applied Studies and Academic Success

Administration

Brian C. Yates, B.S., M.Ed., Ed.D.
Dean, Center for Academic Support & Advising Services
Professor of Education

Dwayne K. Melton, B.S., M.B.A.
Associate Dean
Assistant Professor of Education

Sylvia Hart Frejd, B.A., M.A., D.Min.
Executive Director, Center for Digital Wellness

Alisha P. Castañeda, B.A.S., M.A.
Director, Foreign Language Lab, Online Foreign Language Lab, and Spanish Writing Center

Megan Cordes, B.S., M.Ed., Ed.D.
Director, Individualized Programs of Study
Assistant Professor

Richard Glass, B.B.A.
Director, Career Center

David Hart, B.S., M.A.R.
Director of Advising
Assistant Professor of the Bruckner Learning Center

Lance McClure, B.S., M.A.R.
Director, Technical Studies
Assistant Professor of Technical Studies

William Denton McHaney, B.S., M.Ed.
Director, Office of Disability Academic Support
Associate Professor of Education

Kristen Libka, B.A., M.A.
Director, Undergraduate Writing Center

Orlando Lobaina, B.A., M.A.R., Ed.S.
Director, Academic Success and Testing Services
Assistant Professor

George Sherman, B.S., M.A.
Director, Center for Professional and Continuing Education

Shelah Simpson, B.S., M.A.R., M.A.
Director, Online Writing Center
Associate Professor of English

Tess Stockslager, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
Director, Center for Writing and Languages
Director, Graduate Writing Center
Assistant Professor

S. Denise Green, B.S., M.A.
Director, Bruckner Learning Center
Assistant Professor

David D. Bellows, B.S., M.A.R.
Assistant Director, Academic Success and Testing Services
Assistant Professor

Frank DiGregorio, B.S., M.A.R.
Coordinator, Eagle Scholars Program

Clint Melton, B.S., M.B.A.
Coordinator of Special Projects and New Student Seminar

Kathy Spradlin, B.S., M.S., Ed.D.
Coordinator, Math Emporium
Coordinator, Developmental Mathematics
Associate Professor of Developmental Mathematics

Jackie Owen, A.A.
Coordinator, Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services


Faculty

The faculty roster, which can be sorted by department and faculty type, is available at https://www.liberty.edu/index.cfm?action=faculty&PID=19959&CatID=24.


PURPOSE
The purpose of the College of Applied Studies and Academic Success (CASAS) is to maximize student success, enhance the university experience, and help students discover and achieve the plan God has for them. To accomplish this, the faculty and staff manage academic testing and advising, Integrative Studies requirements, New Student Seminar (NSSR 101), Bruckner Learning Center, Disability Academic Support, Eagle Scholars Program, Center for Writing and Languages, Career Center, Center for Digital Wellness, Individualized Programs of Study and Technical Studies majors as well as Continuing Education courses.

Honor Societies

TAU SIGMA HONOR SOCIETY
Advisors: Dr. Brian C. Yates and Dr. Jacqueline J. Johnson

Tau Sigma is an academic honor society designed specifically to "recognize and promote the academic excellence and involvement of transfer students."

Tau Sigma was incorporated as a non-profit in 1999 with Auburn University being the home of the first chapter. At that time, Auburn University was becoming increasingly aware of the significant number of transfers on campus as well as the university’s inability to adequately serve them. Tau Sigma was born out of Auburn University’s desire to improve its service to and recruiting and retention of transfer students.

Today, over 60 other universities have established or are currently establishing Tau Sigma chapters in their efforts to improve the services that they provide to their transfer student population. Although Tau Sigma is a relatively young organization, many members in all parts of the country have become active at their universities, participating in such activities as on-campus recruiting events for prospective transfer students, transfer student orientation, community service projects, assisting the admissions office with the recruitment of prospective transfers at junior colleges, and participating in intramural sports and socials that allow them opportunities to fellowship with one another and make new friends.

The Liberty University Chapter was approved in fall 2008, with the first class inducted in the spring 2009. To be eligible, a student must be a transfer student having transferred at least 24 college credits and achieve at least a 3.50 GPA while taking a minimum of 12 credit hours during the first semester at Liberty University.

ALPHA LAMBDA DELTA HONOR SOCIETY
Advisors: Dr. Marilyn Gadomski and Mrs. Bessie Grayson
Alpha Lambda Delta (ALD) is a national interdisciplinary honor society founded in 1924 at the University of Illinois to recognize academic excellence among first-year students. The Liberty University Chapter provides Christian, intellectual and social enrichment, along with leadership experience for the officers, for students who will become eligible for the honor societies of their majors.

An invitation for membership is sent to students who meet the following requirements:

  • GPA of 3.50 or higher at the end of the first two semesters of college (with no repeats).
  • Full-time enrollment pursuing a bachelor’s degree.
  • Freshman transfer students must have the required GPA on the courses taken during their first semester of enrollment combined with the cumulative average of their transfer credits.

Individualized Studies Major (B.A. or B.S.)

PURPOSE
The Bachelor of Individualized Studies major is designed to provide an option for the exceptionally talented student who wishes to pursue a particular area of study not available through the structured major and minor programs.

PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES
The student will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate acquisition of core competencies in two content areas;
  2. Assess the moral dimensions and ethical implications in two disciplines;
  3. Demonstrate the integration of knowledge; and
  4. Evidence the synthesis of academic knowledge and Christian values.

PROGRAM APPLICATION PROCEDURES / REQUIREMENTS

  1. Complete application process.
  2. Meet with Director/Professional Advisor, Individualized Programs of Study, as early as possible.
  3. Minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0
  4. Final approval for admission to the program is granted by the Director, Individualized Programs of Study.
  5. The Individualized Studies Proposal and DCP may not be changed without the approval of the Director, Individualized Programs of Study and the respective Department Chairmen.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

  1. Minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0
  2. Degree must be declared/approved prior to graduating semester

Programs of Study

Individualized Studies Major (B.A.)
General Education: Core Competency Requirements (52-59 hrs)
Liberal Arts Focus:
Language Requirements (12 hrs) [Must be one language] 1
Integrative Studies (6 hrs)
Core Courses (3 hrs)
INDS 400 Knowledge Synthesis for Professional and Personal Development 3
Areas of Study (42 hrs)*~
Area of Study I (15-27 hrs)
Area of Study II (15-27 hrs)
Free Electives (0-5 hrs)**
TOTAL HOURS: 120 hours minimum required; at least 30 hours must be 300-400 level.
*One Area of Study must be composed of courses from a single major area, while the second may combine related courses from different departments.
~Chair approval is required if Area of Study is not an approved minor.
**Free Electives may vary depending on Areas of Study chosen.

6 hours must be at the 200 level or above.

Individualized Studies Major (B.S.)
General Education: Core Competency Requirements (58-65 hrs)
Core Courses (3 hrs)
INDS 400 Knowledge Synthesis for Professional and Personal Development 3
Areas of Study (42 hrs)*~
Area of Study I (15-27 hrs)
Area of Study II (15-27 hrs)
Free Electives (10-17 hrs)**
TOTAL HOURS: 120 hours minimum required; at least 30 hours must be 300-400 level.
* One Area of Study must be composed of courses from a single major area, while the second may combine related courses from different departments.
~ Chair approval is required if Area of Study is not an approved minor.
** Free Electives may vary depending on Areas of Study chosen.

Interdisciplinary Studies Major (B.S.)

PURPOSE
The Bachelor of Science in Interdisciplinary Studies major is designed to offer a degree that enables the student to use both inter-college and interdepartmental combinations of courses that will provide a broad pattern of educational experience.

PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES
The student will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate acquisition of core competencies in at least two, but not more than three content areas;
  2. Assess the moral dimensions and ethical implications in at least two disciplines;
  3. Demonstrate the integration of knowledge; and
  4. Evidence the synthesis of academic knowledge and Christian values.

PROGRAM APPLICATION PROCEDURES / REQUIREMENTS

  1. Complete application process
  2. Meet with Director/Professional Advisor, Individualized Programs of Study, as early as possible.
  3. Minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0
  4. Final approval for admission to the program is granted by the Director, Individualized Programs of Study.
  5. The Individualized Studies Proposal and DCP may not be changed without the approval of the Director, Individualized Programs of Study and the respective Department Chairmen.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

  1. Degree must be declared/approved prior to graduating semester
     

Program of Study

Interdisciplinary Studies Major (B.S.)
General Education: Core Competency Requirements (58-65 hrs)
Core Courses (3 hrs)
INDS 400 Knowledge Synthesis for Professional and Personal Development 3
Areas of Study (45 hrs) *~
Area of Study I
Area of Study II
Area of Study III
Free Electives (7-14 hrs)**
TOTAL HOURS: 120 hours minimum required; at least 30 hours must be 300-400 level.
* Complete 45 hours in at least two, but not more than three, academic disciplines with no more than 30 hours and no less than 15 hours from any one discipline. The courses may be in most fields offered by the University.
~ Chair approval is required if Area of Study is not an approved minor.
** Free Electives may vary depending on Areas of Study chosen.

Associate of Applied Science in Technical Studies Major (A.A.S.)

Director: Lance McClure
PURPOSE

The Associate of Applied Science (AAS) in Technical Studies degree is a 60 credit hour program consisting of 38 hours of general education required courses, 12 core hours and 10-16 hours of required technical requirements.  Instruction in most technical coursework will be delivered at Virginia Technical Institute, 201 Ogden Road, Altavista, Virginia.

PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES
The student will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate a comprehensive knowledge of the skills required by craft workers and technicians employed in the construction industry.
  2. Demonstrate appropriate safety and first aid procedures.

Program of Study

Technical Studies Major (A.A.S.)
General Education: Core Competency Requirements (38-45 hrs)
Core Courses in Major (12 hrs)
BUSI 223 Personal Finance 3
CRFT 101 Introduction to Craft Skills 3
ECON 110 Survey of Economics 3
HLTH 205 Accident Prevention and Care (First Aid) 3
Technical Requirements (10-16 hrs)
Choose from CARP, ELTC, HVAC, PLMB, and/or WELD
Free Electives (0-1 hr)
TOTAL HOURS: 60 hours minimum required.
NOTE: Some Courses will be delivered at Virginia Technical Institute in Altavista, VA.

Technical Studies Minors

Technical coursework will be delivered at Virginia Technical Institute, 201 Ogden Road, Altavista, Virginia.

Technical Studies Minor (15 hrs)
CRFT 101 Introduction to Craft Skills 3
Choose 12 credits from the following courses: 12
CARP 101, 201, 301, 401
ELTC 101, 201, 301, 401
HVAC 101, 201, 301, 401
PLMB 101, 201, 301, 401
WELD 101, 201, 301, 401

Academic Advising

Director: David Hart
Freshmen and Sophomores will receive personalized advising through their assigned Professional Advisor, based on the student’s academic area of study. Professional Advisors will provide student support for questions concerning academic issues. Juniors and Seniors will meet with faculty, as needed, in the Academic Department that corresponds with their major. Both Professional Advisors and Faculty will assist students with reaching their spiritual, academic, and personal goals.

Academic Success & Testing Services

Director: Orlando Lobaina

TUTORING SERVICES
Face-to-face or online peer tutoring is offered in approximately 35 subject areas to residential students desiring academic assistance during the fall and spring semesters at no additional cost. Subjects are offered based on tutor availability.  For more information, visit the website at www.liberty.edu/tutoring.

TESTING SERVICES
Make-up testing is provided in the Bruckner Learning Center, Testing Services at the direction of individual professors. Other forms of testing available include: CLEP, ICE (Institutional Challenge Exam), PRAXIS, DSST (DANTES Subject Standardized Tests), and the proctoring of tests from other institutions or organizations. Fees are associated with these tests. For more information, visit the website at http://www.liberty.edu/testing for the current fee schedule.


Bruckner Learning Center

Director: Denise Green
The Bruckner Learning Center (BLC) provides a wide range of programs to enhance the academic success of Liberty University students. A valuable course available to incoming freshmen is MENT 101, which provides small group instruction/mentoring, accountability partners and topics such as study strategies and life skills. CLST 101 is designed to teach students the study skills necessary for college success. Other offerings include CLST 105, which provides mentoring and accountability, and CLST 301, an advanced speed reading course designed to build vocabulary and accelerate reading speed. Additionally, CLST 104 is a transitional study skills course offered in the summer that incorporates New Student Seminar. Any new freshman may take CLST 104. Applicants must apply and be accepted into the Summer Bridge Program in order to participate in CLST 104.

Students who are placed on Academic Warning/Probation will be required to complete a College Learning Strategies (CLST) course to assist them in their academic progress during that semester of Academic Warning/Probation. In such instances, if a student withdraws, or receives a grade lower than a C, the course must be retaken in the subsequent semester. A student may not drop or withdraw from the course without permission from the Director Bruckner Learning Center.

DEVELOPMENTAL MATH
Coordinator: Dr. Kathy Spradlin

Developmental Math is a component of the Bruckner Learning Center. Placement of MATH 100 and MATH 110 into the developmental model allows students to be in an affective learning environment that focuses on improving student attitudes toward math, identifying individual learning styles and providing intensive personal attention through tutoring and computer assistance in our Math Emporium. The ultimate goal is to move the students toward further success in mathematics. MATH 100 is offered to students who do not have strong math skills; it is a review of basic arithmetic and elementary algebra. MATH 110 is offered for those who do not have prerequisite algebra skills for college-level math. Topics reviewed include exponents, factoring, graphing, equations, and rational expressions.

Top


Career Center

Director: Richard Glass
The Career Center provides services that equip students with the professional development skills to combine with their academic training in preparation for their career goals. Many services are also available to alumni, including resume critiques, job searching information, and other services to further career advancement or career change.

CAREER SERVICES

  • Website: http://www.liberty.edu/career
  • Career Assessment Test – Focus 2 (Free to Students)
  • Career Counseling
  • Local and Regional Industry-Specific Career Fairs
  • Online Job Database – LUNETWORK for internships, full-time and part-time opportunities all over the country
  • Career Workshops and Professional Skills Development
  • Resume and Cover Letter Workshops and Critiques
  • Job Search and Research
  • Mock Interviews
  • Graduate School Preparation
  • Internships and Externships
  • The Washington Fellowship

The Career Center is located on the first-floor of DeMoss Hall, a highly visible and easily accessible location that includes state-of-the-art meeting facilities, interview rooms, computer lab, and professional development facilities. The Focus 2 assessment combined with career counseling is available to assist students in determining career goals and implementing appropriate educational plans. Through the website, online job listings, career resource library, and a computerized interest assessment, students are encouraged to explore various occupational fields, develop job-hunting skills, and research graduate education programs. Staff, alumni, and employers conduct training workshops on topics such as resume writing, interviewing techniques, and job search strategies. Further networking opportunities are provided through Career Fairs, on-campus interviewing, and networking. Students are also encouraged to participate in experiential education programs, such as externships and internships, including the Washington Fellowship and job shadowing opportunities, which provide practical work experience and complement their formal education.

The Career Center provides online access to career services without closing hours. Our goal is to deliver professional development services, workshops and resources through online mediums without compromising the quality of service between Career Center staff and students. Career Center services and resources help students become professionals prepared for the world of work.

For more information on any of the stated topics, please visit the Career Center website at http://www.liberty.edu/career.

LUNETWORK – JOB DATABASE
Liberty University’s exclusive employer relationship database, LUNETWORK, is the on-line database that has thousands of employers looking for Liberty students, recent graduates, and alumni. Employers from all over the country (and world) are purposefully posting positions looking for Liberty talent. Postings include internships and full time positions for both new graduates and seasoned professionals. Students and alumni can post their resume and search the database for positions all over the world. Residential and Online Students and Alumni are eligible to utilize LUNETWORK for life.

INTERNSHIP PROGRAM
All students are encouraged to complete an internship to assist with career planning and gain practical experience within their chosen field of study. Approximately sixty-percent of all interns receive a full-time job offer. Students may earn from one to six (in some cases nine) semester hours of credit. Many majors require at least three credits. All applicants for credit internships, which are listed in the University’s Catalog under a 499 number, are processed through the students’ Faculty Internship Advisor located within their department. Zero-credit internships are also available; they will be listed on the student’s transcript with an appropriate departmental prefix under a 299 number. The zero-credit internships are processed through the Liberty University Career Center. For additional information regarding internships contact internships@liberty.edu.    

Completed applications for internships must be submitted to the Faculty Internship Advisor (FIA) for the Department of the student’s major. Check with your department for forms and deadlines. Students are encouraged to apply for internships a semester in advance. Previous work experience does not qualify for an internship and will not be considered for academic credit.

THE WASHINGTON FELLOWSHIP
Students are also encouraged to consider participating in The Washington Fellowship. This program allows students, from all majors, to be placed in a semester-long internship in Washington, DC. Students are required to register for a six credit internship (the zero-credit internship is not open to students in this program) and take at least six credits through online courses, thus maintaining their full-time residential status as Liberty University students. On-site housing is required for all students participating in The Washington Fellowship. For more information, contact washington@liberty.edu or visit http://www.liberty.edu/washington.

IMPORTANT INFORMATION REGARDING INTERNSHIPS AND CLINICAL PLACEMENTS
Students who are pursuing degrees leading to application for professional licensure or certification, and/or who will be participating in clinical placements, internships, or practica through their Liberty University program should be aware that their host facility may require a criminal background check, finger printing, or drug screening. In such situations, each student is responsible for obtaining and paying for the background check or other screening process and for delivering required documentation to the facility. Although the university will make reasonable efforts to place admitted students in field experiences and internship, it will be up to the host facility to determine whether a student will be allowed to work at that facility.

Students should further be aware that a criminal record may jeopardize licensure by the State certification body. Students seeking licensure are urged to contact the relevant licensing agency to determine the licensing requirements for the jurisdiction. Successful completion of a program of study at Liberty University does not guarantee licensure, certification, or employment in the relevant occupation.

Top

Center for Digital Wellness

Executive Director:  Dr. Sylvia Hart Frejd
The Center for Digital Wellness at Liberty University is the nation’s first Digital Wellness Center dedicated to teaching a healthy use and theology of technology. Digital technology has invaded every area of our lives and relationships and we believe there is a great need to establish some digital boundaries. This will be accomplished through raising Awareness, Education and Prevention. Our goal is to transform a culture of distraction to a culture of engagement so that every Liberty student would practice digital wellness for a lifetime.


Center for Professional and Continuing Education

Director: George Sherman
The Liberty University Center for Professional and Continuing Education (CPCE) provides residential and online professional development and community service activities through credit and noncredit offerings.

Credit offerings include certificate programs and Summer Programming. Certificate programs, generally delivered online, complement undergraduate or graduate degrees, and Summer Programming delivers in-residence academic classes through compressed schedules. Both programs award college credit which supports academic degrees.

Noncredit activities, including instructional services, consultation, technical assistance, and community education classes, conferences, workshops, etc., generally award Continuing Education Units (CEUs).

To effectively serve individuals and organizations, the CPCE offers its services through open enrollment and customized venues.

Top


Center for Writing and Languages

Director: Tess Stockslager
The Center for Writing and Languages (CWL), formerly known as the University Writing Program (UWP), was established in 2006 as part of Liberty’s efforts to improve graduate student writing. The heart of the CWL is one-on-one coaching. The CWL—the umbrella organization over the Graduate Writing Center (GWC), Undergraduate Writing Center (UWC), Online Writing Center (OWC), Spanish Writing Center (SWC), Foreign Language Lab (FLL), and Online Foreign Language Lab (OFLL)—employs advanced students with superior writing and teaching skills to offer individualized writing and language instruction to Liberty University students.

In addition to coaching, the CWL also offers a variety of tools to help students with their writing. The CWL webpage (http://www.liberty.edu/cwl) includes a large collection of resources on common topics such as “commas” or “APA Documentation.” In addition, the web page offers a variety of links to reliable online sources for writing instruction. Through the web page, students can e-mail quick questions to writing-center coaches or offer suggestions for further online writing aids that the CWL should consider developing. Foreign language resources are also available on the Foreign Language Lab web page.

The Directors of the CWL are available to faculty for classroom presentations or for help in developing teaching aids, rubrics, or assignments. CWL staff members routinely make presentations on topics such as documentation, common grammar errors, plagiarism, and many other writing and language skills in classrooms and in faculty workshops. In addition, all faculty and staff are encouraged to bring their academic work to the GWC for review and commentary by the Director.

Currently, all CWL services are free of charge to Liberty University students, staff, and faculty. Faculty may download any CWL-produced online materials for use in their classes.

GRADUATE WRITING CENTER
Director: Tess Stockslager

The GWC offers writing-related services tailored to the University’s residential graduate population, and it supports faculty members as they seek to incorporate writing instruction in their classrooms. The GWC also offers help to any Liberty University affiliated scholars seeking to publish or present their work in professional venues. A trained coach will review drafts and offer feedback, suggestions for revision, and personalized instruction on all aspects of the writing process. Coaches can help with brainstorming, grammar, punctuation, content, organization, and documentation, and help is available to students from the earliest stages of a program through the thesis or dissertation.

Coaching for counseling and seminary students is also available, by appointment, in the Center for Counseling and Family Studies in the Carter building. Residential students or faculty may contact the center by calling (434) 592-4727 or by emailing graduatewriting@liberty.edu.

UNDERGRADUATE WRITING CENTER
Director: Kristen Libka

The Undergraduate Writing Center (UWC) was established as part of Liberty’s efforts to improve student writing. Formed in 2008, the UWC builds on the programs and services already established in the Graduate Writing Center (GWC).

The heart of the UWC is one-on-one coaching. The UWC employs advanced students with superior writing and teaching skills to offer individualized writing instruction to any Liberty University undergraduate student. Residential students can schedule appointments with the UWC, and a coach will review their drafts and offer feedback, suggestions for revision, and personalized instruction on all aspects of the writing process. Coaches can help with brainstorming, grammar, punctuation, content, organization, and documentation, and they are available from the earliest stages of a program through the capstone project.

Residential students or faculty may contact the center by calling (434) 592-3174 or by e-mailing undergradwriting@liberty.edu.

ONLINE WRITING CENTER
Director: Shelah Simpson

The Online Writing Center (OWC) was established as part of Liberty’s efforts to improve student writing and thus offers writing-related services tailored to the University’s online student population. Through the Online Writing Center web page (http://www.liberty.edu/onlinewritingcenter), online students can submit drafts of upcoming assignments to receive coach feedback, schedule appointments to speak online with a coach, e-mail quick questions to coaches, or offer suggestions for further online writing aids that the OWC should consider developing. Students may contact the OWC by emailing onlinewriting@liberty.edu.

FOREIGN LANGUAGE LAB
Director: Alisha P. Castañeda

In addition to the writing centers, the Center for Writing and Languages offers foreign language coaching services through the Foreign Language Lab. The primary purpose of the Foreign Language Lab is to provide one-on-one and group coaching sessions for students studying American Sign Language, Chinese, French, German, and Spanish.  However, coaching for students who are learning English as a second language (ESL) is also provided.

The Foreign Language Lab employs advanced undergraduate students who have native speaking ability in the offered foreign languages and advanced knowledge of the grammar and writing skills correlated to those languages. Individuals can schedule a coaching session ahead of time with the coach or come for a walk-in appointment.  They will receive personalized instruction on all areas related to language acquisition, including grammar, vocabulary, appropriate writing style, and oral and auditory practice and development.

In addition to providing foreign language and ESL coaching, the Foreign Language Lab offers conversation groups in each language, including English conversation groups for non-native speakers. Conversation groups help language learners practice their listening and speaking skills in a relaxed and open setting.

The Director of the Foreign Language Lab is available to faculty for classroom presentations or for help in developing teaching aids, rubrics, or assignments.  In addition, all foreign language faculty are welcome to make the lab part of their students’ classroom experience, either by holding classes in the lab or requiring students to visit for coaching services.

Persons interested in utilizing the services offered by the Foreign Language Lab may contact the lab by emailing foreignlanguagelab@liberty.edu, calling (434) 592-6514, or visiting http://www.liberty.edu/foreignlanguagelab. The Foreign Language Lab is located in the CWL suite in Green Hall 2750.

ONLINE FOREIGN LANGUAGE LAB
Director: Alisha P. Castañeda

In August 2012, the Center for Writing and Languages (CWL) opened the Online Foreign Language Lab (OFLL).  While the residential Foreign Language Lab (FLL) offers customized foreign language coaching services for residential students, the OFLL reaches out to Liberty University’s online population.  The OFLL provides free one-on-one coaching sessions for students studying German, Mandarin, Spanish, and English as a second language (ESL) through the Liberty University Online conversational language courses.

The OFLL employs highly qualified individuals with native-speaking ability who not only meet the language standards but are also skilled in effectively coaching and teaching essential language skills.  These coaches provide personalized instruction in all areas related to language acquisition, including grammar, vocabulary, appropriate writing style, and oral and auditory practice and development.  Considering the long-distance nature of online learning, students will meet with coaches via Skype and Google Hangouts. To find out more information about this center and scheduling an appointment, students can contact the OFLL by any of the following methods:

SPANISH WRITING CENTER:
CENTRO DE ESCRITURA EN ESPAÑOL

Director: Alisha P. Castañeda
The Center for Writing and Languages (CWL) also houses the Spanish Writing Center (SWC), or Centro de Escritura en Español (CEE), which provides writing coaching services for Liberty University en Español (LUE) students. The SWC aims to improve LUE’s undergraduate and graduate student populations’ writing skills by providing written and live feedback on essays and other written assignments, administering writing skills development exercises, and developing flyers and presentations with quick reference information regarding grammar, formal/academic writing standards, writing styles (MLA, APA, and Turabian), and more. By providing these free services, the SWC improves the students’ chances for academic success.

While other universities have Spanish writing centers geared toward coaching students learning the Spanish language, Liberty University´s SWC is a unique and innovative center that assists Spanish-speaking students who are writing in their native language. For more information, please visit the SWC at:

Top


Eagle Scholars Program

Coordinator: Frank DiGregorio  
T he Eagle Scholars Program provides high achieving freshman and sophomore students the training necessary for personal and professional development to become leaders throughout college and beyond. This program fosters a sense of community, bolsters academic knowledge and provides leadership and professional experience. For more information, please visit the Eagle Scholars website at http://www.liberty.edu/eaglescholars.

Students in the Eagle Scholars Program take a series of four courses to complete the program.

  • ESLP 101: Introduction to Leadership: Connecting with Others
  • ESLP 102: Self Leadership Development
  • ESLP 201: The Art and Science of Leading Others
  • ESLP 202: The Art and Science of Changing Culture

Please see the Courses of Instruction – Residential Program for complete course information.

Top
 

LEAD Fellowship

Associate Director, Center for Multicultural Enrichment:  Jose Hernandez
This fellowship prepares undergraduate students to excel with a holistic approach to student development.  Through character development (spiritual growth, leadership, cultural competency, mentoring), academic support, career guidance, service learning and family involvement, the LEAD Fellowship fosters the success of each student through weekly workshops and experiential learning opportunities.  This program targets minority, first generation, and at risk students.

Students in the LEAD Fellowship take a series of courses to complete the program:

  • MENT 101: Mentoring for University Transition
  • LEAD 102: Introduction to Leadership, Spiritual Life, and Cultural Intelligence
  • LEAD 201: Equipped with Skill, Authenticity, and Cultural Intelligence
  • LEAD 202: Leading with Skill, Authenticity, and Cultural Intelligence
  • LEAD 301: Engaging Culture through Empowerment, Leadership, and Cultural Intelligence
  • LEAD 302: Changing Cultural through Empowerment, Leadership, and Cultural Intelligence
  • LEAD 401: Senior Project Introduction and Preparation
  • LEAD 499: Senior Project

Please see the Courses of Instruction – Residential Program for complete course information.

New Student Seminar

Coordinator: Clint Melton
All new students (transfer or freshman), regardless of hours transferred, credit earned through Dual Enrollment, CLEP or AP credit, are required to complete New Student Seminar (NSSR 101) prior to the beginning of their first semester at Liberty University (LU).  This course is a graduation requirement, and designed to introduce an environment for success while also providing structure and support as new students navigate the academic, spiritual, social and physical campus that is LU.


Office of Disability Academic Support

Director: William Denton McHaney
The Office of Disability Academic Support (ODAS) provides academic support services for students with documented disabilities. A student who has a disability may be assigned to a Disability Academic Support advisor who has had training in accommodation of disabled students. That faculty member acts as a liaison between instructors and the individual regarding classroom accommodations and will function in a dual advising role with the CASAS Professional Advisor in the student’s chosen major.  With the student’s permission, each instructor is informed that the student has a disability, and suggestions for appropriate accommodations are made, as needed and desired. 

The Osborne Assistive Learning Technology Center provides access to computers with text reader software with synthetic speech, speech recognition software to turn speech into print, and organizational software.

Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services provides accommodations for students who are d/Deaf or hard of hearing.  These services may include the provision of qualified Sign Language interpreters for academic classes and related events, cultural mediation, note takers, academic advising, priority classroom seating, and priority pre-registration.

Top



Highlighted text indicates a change from the official version of the catalog.