The Center for Teaching Excellence

Faith Learning Integration

Faith Learning Integration at Liberty University

FLI Gallery

Faith Learning Integration (FLI)can be found in all classrooms and across all disciplines at Liberty University. 

Visit our FLI GALLERY of successful examples of Faith Learning Integration.


 

FLI Brown Bag Lunch Series

The center has planned a series of brown bag luncheons centered on the topic of faith learning integration.  The format resembles that of a roundtable discussion with audience input and participation.  Upcoming sessions include:

  • Oct. 29:  Dr. Harold Willmington
  • Nov. 19:  Dr. Bruce Bell
  • Feb. 25:  Linda Nell Cooper
  • Mar. 4:  Dr. Vernon Whaley

All brown bag luncheons are held from 11 a.m. – noon in the CTE training classroom, DeMoss 3032.  The term brown bag suggests that faculty bring their own lunch (CTE provides drinks and snacks).  To make the luncheons more conducive to quality discussion, seating is limited.  Sign-up in the Pro Dev Portal (CTE tab).


 

CTE Lending Library

The CTE has several books on faith learning integration in its lending library for faculty to borrow.  Stop by and pick up a copy.

The seamless integration of faith and academics is a critical component of an excellent, well-rounded education from a Biblical Worldview.  The integration of faith and learning entails more than including a Bible verse at the beginning of a lecture, having a devotional, or praying with a class.  While all of these components are important to a Christian classroom, full integration advances this approach to include the critical examination of academic content through the lens of a Christian student.  Faith Learning Integration identifies how God's brilliant design is found across all disciplines and how its identification helps reveal the very nature of God, man, creation, purpose, redemption, salvation, and order.  Faith Learning Integration is a necessary ingredient of a student's search for truth, reason, and morality, as well as the student's academic, social, and spiritual development.

To learn more about Liberty University's position, please read Liberty University's Doctrinal Statement, Philosophy on Education, and Mission and Purpose.

Faith Learning Integration Resources

There are a myriad of institutions, organizations, journals, books, and resources available to help guide the integration of faith and learning.

Centers and Institutes

Journals and Reviews

Articles

Recommended Books

  • Benne, R. (2001). Quality with Soul: How Six Premier Christian Colleges and Universities Keep Faith with their Religious Traditions. Eerdmans.
  • Burtcaeli, J. T. (1998). The Dying of the Light: The Disengagement of Colleges and Universities from their Christian Churches. Eerdmans.
  • Dockery, D. S., & Thornbury, G. A. (Eds.). (2002). Shaping a Christian Worldview: The Foundations of Christian Higher Education. B & H Publishing.
  • Gill, D. W. (1997). Should God Get Tenure? Essays on Religion and Higher Education. Eerdmans.
  • Hankins, B. G., & Schmeltekopf, D. D. (Eds.). (2007). The Baylor Project: Taking Christian Higher Education to the Next Level. St. Augustine's Press.
  • Harris, R. A. (2004). The Integration of Faith and Learning: A Worldview Approach. Cascade Books.
  • Hart, D. B. (2003). The Beauty of the Infinite: The Aesthetics of Christian Truth. Eerdmans.
  • Haynes, S. R., (Ed.). (2002). Professing in the Postmodern Academy: Faculty and the Future of Church-Related Colleges. Issues in Religion and Higher Education. Baylor.
  • Henry, D. V. & Agee, B. R. (Eds.). (2003). Faithful Learning and the Christian Scholarly Vocation. Eerdmans.
  • Henry, D. V. & Beaty, M. (Eds.). (2006). Christianity and the Soul of the University: Faith as a Foundation for Intellectual Community. Baker Academic.
  • Hughes, R. (2001). How Christian Faith Can Sustain the Life of the Mind. Eerdmans.
  • Katongole, E. & Rice, C. (2008). Reconciling all Things: A Christian Vision for Justice, Peace, and Healing. InterVarsity.
  • Johnson, P. E. (1995). Reason in the Balance: The Case Against Naturalism in Science, Law, and Education. IntervVarsity.
  • Johnson, P. E. (2002). The Right Questions: Truth, Meaning, and Public Debate. InterVarsity.
  • Marsden, G. M. (1997). The Outrageous Idea of Christian Scholarship. Oxford.
  • Marty, M. E. (2000). Education, Religion, and the Common Good: Advancing a Distinctly American Conversation about Religion's Role in Our Shared Life. With Jonathan Moore. Jossey-Bass.
  • Moreland, J. P. (1997). Love Your God with All of Your Mind: The Role of Reason in the Life of the Soul. NavPress.
  • Moreland, J. P. & Craig, W. L. (2003). Philosophical Foundations for a Christian Worldview. InterVarsity.
  • Palmer, M. D. & Horton, S. M. (Eds.). (1998). Elements of a Christian Worldview. Logion.
  • Peterson, M. L. (2001). With All of Your Mind: A Christian Philosophy of Education. Notre Dame.
  • Riley Schaefer, N. (2004). God on the Quad: How Religious Colleges and the Missionary Generation Are Changing America. St. Martin's Press.
  • Sire, J. W. (2004). The Universe Next Door: A Basic Worldview Catalog. InterVarsity.
  • Smith, J. K. (2009). Desiring the kingdom: Worship, Worldview, and Cultural Formation. Baker Academic.
  • Veith, G. E., Jr. (1994). Postmodern Times: A Christian Guide to Contemporary Thought and Culture. Crossway.
  • Wolterstorff, N. P. (2002). Educating for Life: Reflections on Christian Teaching and Learning. (Ed.) Goris Stronks, G. & Joldersma, C. W. Baker Academic.

Other Resources

Faith Integration Gallery

Please visit our FLI GALLERY to view successful examples of Faith Learning Integration.