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Undergraduate Catalog 2013-2014

School of Health Sciences

Administration

Ralph F. Linstra, B.S., M.Ed., Ed.D., C.H.E.S.
Dean, School of Health Sciences
Professor of Health Professions


Beverly S. Mahoney, R.N., B.S., M.S., Ph.D., M.C.H.E.S., F.A.S.H.A., F.A.A.H.E.
Associate Dean, School of Health Sciences
Professor of Health Professions

Steve E. Warren, B.S., M.A.
Associate Dean, School of Health Sciences
Assistant Professor of Psychology

David A. DeWitt, B.S., Ph.D.
Chair, Department of Biology and Chemistry
Director, Center for Creation Studies
Professor of Biology

James Schoffstall, B.S., M.S.Ed., Ed.D., CSCS, HFS, CIFT, RCEP, FACSM
Chair, Department of Health Professions
Director, Human Performance Lab

Professor of Health Professions

Deanna C. Britt, R.N., B.S.N., M.S.N., Ph.D.
Chair, Department of Nursing
Professor of Nursing

Daniel Logan, B.S., M.A., Ed.D.
Chair, Department of Psychology
Associate Professor of Psychology

Mark Myers, B.S., M.A.R., M.R.E., Ph.D.
Chair, Center for Counseling and Family Studies
Assistant Professor of Counseling


PURPOSE
The School of Health Sciences exists to prepare men and women in the sciences and health professions through the integration of current scientific thought and the biblical worldview. Current undergraduate degree programs include: the B.S. in Athletic Training, Biology, Biochemistry, Biomedical Sciences, Cell and Molecular Biology, Chemistry, Exercise Science, Environmental Biology, Health Promotion, Kinesiology, and Zoology; the B.S.N and the R.N. to B.S.N. in Nursing; the A.A. and B.S. in Psychology; and the A.A.S. in Medical Office Assistant.

At the graduate level, the School offers the M.S. in Biomedical Sciences, the M.A. in Human Services, the M.A. in Marriage Family Therapy, the M.A. in Professional Counseling, the Master of Public Health, the M.S. in Nursing, and the Ph.D. in Professional Counseling degrees.


Department of Biology and Chemistry

David A. DeWitt, B.S., Ph.D.
Chair, Department of Biology and Chemistry
Director, Center for Creation Studies
Professor of Biology

Randall D. Davy, B.S., M.S., Ph.D.
Director of  Chemistry
Professor of Chemistry

Norman G. Reichenbach, B.S., M.S., Ph.D.
Director of General and Organismal Biology
Professor of Biology

Faculty

RESIDENTIAL - FULL-TIME
Professor
Blais; Davy; DeWitt, D.; Gillen; Howell; Hubbard; McClintock; Reichenbach; Sattler, E.; Sattler, P.; Sharp; Spohn

Associate Professor
Allen; Brophy; Fulp; McGuirt; Richardson; Ross

Assistant Professor
Brown, C.; Fabich; Goldin; Isaacs; Kalu; Korn; McGibbon; Mitchell; Whittle

Instructor
Bullock


PURPOSE
The Department of Biology and Chemistry provides baccalaureate programs in biology, biomedical sciences, cell and molecular biology, environmental biology, zoo and wildlife biology, zoology, and biochemistry, and services courses in biology and chemistry for Resident and Online Programs. Our programs seek both to transmit and expand knowledge as well as to provide opportunities for research and service. The Department is a community of persons who are voluntarily linked in the pursuit of knowledge, providing a reasoned presentation of these academic disciplines in relation to the Christian faith. The Department’s mission is to communicate academic content, Christian values, and requisite skills, all of which prepare persons for a lifetime process of learning and service.

TEACHER LICENSURE
Teacher preparation and endorsement in Biology and Chemistry is available through the Department of Biology and Chemistry. Those wishing to pursue teacher-related programs should seek information from the Teacher Licensure Office in the School of Education. Licensure information is also available at http://www.liberty.edu/uguide.


ARTICULATION AGREEMENT WITH EDWARD VIA VIRGINIA COLLEGE OF OSTEOPATHIC MEDICINE
Liberty University (LU) and the Edward Via Virginia College of Osteopathic Medicine (VCOM) have agreed to cooperate in a program by which a Liberty student is offered early acceptance to VCOM following a distinct academic protocol and the demonstration of high academic achievement.

In addition, VCOM and LU have created a combined studies program where a student may attend LU for three years, gain admission to VCOM, then complete his or her baccalaureate degree with LU through credits earned in select VCOM courses.  VCOM has reserved seats in both programs for LU students who meet the program requirements.

VCOM offers the Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine (D.O.) degree, which is recognized in every state as the full practice of medicine.  The D.O. philosophy includes the practice of medicine from the whole person approach, paying attention to the physical, spiritual, and mental needs of each patient, and partnering with the patient to prevent disease.  VCOM trains students to practice compassionate and altruistic medical care and its training programs include international and Appalachian medical missions.  Visit http://www.vcom.vt.edu for additional information.

Details concerning each program that is a part of the articulation agreement are available from the Program Coordinator in the Department of Biology and Chemistry (434-582-2209) or MedicalCoordinator@liberty.edu).


PRE-MED HONOR SOCIETY
Advisor: Dr. Mark Blais

The purpose of the Pre-Med Honor Society is to give recognition to students who have excelled in the biology and chemistry curricula or any other Liberty University major. Members of the Pre-Med honor society are exemplary for their high academic achievement, strong personal characteristics and their deep commitment to helping others.

Criteria for membership:
A student must have:

  1. Maintained a GPA of at least 3.50 in any major field of study, and
  2. A deep interest in becoming medical doctors.

Career Opportunities

Chemical Technician Medical School
Chirpractic School Medical Technologist
Dental School National Park Ranger
Environmental Biology Osteopathic School
H.S. Biology Teacher Pharmacy School
Junior Toxicologist Physician Assistant
Laboratory Research Assistant Veterinary School
Graduate School and Research in:
Biochemistry                       Microbiology
Biology   Molecular Biology
Ecology   Neuroscience
Genetics   Physiology
Marine Biology   Wildlife Management

Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Major (B.S.)

PURPOSE 
The purpose of the Biochemistry and Molecular Biology major is to prepare students for medical and related professional schools, graduate school, and employment in the field of biochemistry.

PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES
The student will be able to:

  1. Communicate scientific information both orally and in writing.
  2. Design and conduct biochemical experiments.
  3. Apply standards and principles of safe practice in the laboratory or field environment.
  4. Evaluate ethical issues in the life sciences in light of a biblical/Christian worldview.
  5. Demonstrate competence in biochemistry, cell, and molecular biology.
  6. Analyze and critique laboratory research results in the biochemical or molecular sciences.

Program of Study

Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Major (B.S.)
General Education: Core Competency Requirements (59-63 hrs)
Courses in the Major (36 hrs)*
BIOL 224 General Biology I 4
BIOL 207 General Botany 4
OR
BIOL 225 General Biology II
BIOL 301 Genetics 4
BIOL 303 Microbiology 4
BIOL 400 Biology Seminar 1
BIOL 415 Cell Biology 4
BIOL 455 Molecular Techniques 3
BIOL Electives (300-400 level) 4
BCHM 451 Biochemistry I 4
BCHM 452 Biochemistry II 4
Directed Courses (Required) (24-36 hrs)*
CHEM 121 General Chemistry I 4**
CHEM 122 General Chemistry II 4**
CHEM 301 Organic Chemistry I 4
CHEM 302 Organic Chemistry II 4
MATH 131 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I 4**
MATH 132 Calculus and Analytic Geometry II 4**
MATH 133 Calculus with Mathematica Lab 1
MATH 211 Introduction to Statistical Analysis 3**
PHYS 231 University Physics I 4**
PHYS 232 University Physics II 4**
Free Electives (0-1 hr)
TOTAL HOURS: 120 hours minimum required; at least 36 hours must be 300-400 level.
*“C” or better is required in all courses.
**These approved General Education courses may be counted in Core Competency Requirements.

Biology Major (B.S.)

PURPOSE
The purpose of the Biology major is to prepare students for medical and related professional schools, graduate school, and employment in the biological sciences or in teaching.

PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES
The student will be able to:

  1. Communicate scientific information both orally and in writing.
  2. Design and conduct biological experiments.
  3. Apply standards and principles of safe practice in the laboratory or field environment.
  4. Evaluate ethical issues in the life sciences in light of a Biblical/Christian worldview.
  5. Demonstrate competence in the basic categories of the biological sciences.
  6. Analyze and critique field or laboratory research results in the molecular or ecological sciences.

Programs of Study

Biology Major (B.S.) General Biology
General Education: Core Competency Requirements (59-63 hrs)
Courses in the Major (36 hrs)*
BIOL 224 General Biology I 4
BIOL 225 General Biology II 4
BIOL 207 General Botany 4
BIOL 301 Genetics 4
BIOL 310 Ecology 4
BIOL 400 Biology Seminar 1
BIOL 415 Cell Biology 4
BIOL ___ Elective (300-400 level) 11
Directed Courses (Required) (18-36 hrs)*
CHEM 121 General Chemistry I 4**
CHEM 122 General Chemistry II 4**
CHEM 301 Organic Chemistry I 4
CHEM 302 Organic Chemistry II 4
Choose one of the following groups: 3-9
MATH 126 Elementary Calculus for Business and Science **
OR
MATH 131 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I **
MATH 132 Calculus and Analytic Geometry II **
MATH 133 Calculus with Mathematica Lab **
Choose one of the following courses: 3
MATH 201 Introduction to Probability and Statistics **
MATH 211 Introduction to Statistical Analysis **
Choose one of the following groups: 8
PHYS 201 General Physics I **
PHYS 202 General Physics II **
OR
PHYS 231 University Physics I **
PHYS 232 University Physics II **
Free Electives (3-7 hrs)
TOTAL HOURS: 120 hours minimum required; at least 32 hours must be 300-400 level.
* “C” or better is required in all courses
** These approved General Education courses may be counted in Core Competency Requirements.
NOTES: CHEM 121 and 122 are prerequisites to BIOL 301. CHEM 301 is a prerequisite or co-requisite to BIOL 415. MATH 201/BUSI 230 or 211 is a prerequisite to BIOL 310.
Biology Major (B.S.) General Biology - Teacher Licensure
General Education: Core Competency Requirements (59-63 hrs)
Core Courses in the Major (36 hrs)*
BIOL 224 General Biology I 4
BIOL 225 General Biology II 4
BIOL 207 General Botany 4
BIOL 301 Genetics 4
BIOL 303 Microbiology 4
BIOL 310 Ecology 4
BIOL 400 Biology Seminar 1
BIOL 415 Cell Biology 4
BIOL ___ Elective (300-400 level) 4
BIOL ___ Elective (300-400 level) 3
Directed Courses (Required) (3-12 hrs)*
CHEM 121 General Chemistry I 4**
CHEM 122 General Chemistry II 4**
CHEM 301 Organic Chemistry I 4
CHEM 302 Organic Chemistry II 4
PSYC 210 Developmental Psychology 3**
Choose one of the following groups: 3-9
MATH 126 Elementary Calculus for Business and Science **
OR
MATH 131 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I **
MATH 132 Calculus and Analytic Geometry II **
MATH 133 Calculus with Mathematica Lab **
Choose one of the following courses: 3
MATH 201 Introduction to Probability and Statistics **
MATH 211 Introduction to Statistical Analysis **
Choose one of the following groups: 8
PHYS 201 General Physics I **
PHYS 202 General Physics II **
OR
PHYS 231 University Physics I **
PHYS 232 University Physics II **
Teacher Licensure Requirements (31 hrs)
EDUC 125 Introduction to Education 1
EDUC 221 Content Area Reading and Differentiated Teaching and Learning (Secondary) 2
EDUC 235 Instructional Design: Secondary 1
EDUC 236 Instructional Design Practicum: Secondary 2
EDUC 240 Introduction to Applied Educational Technology Practicum 2
EDUC 360 Foundations of Education 2
EDUC 425 Secondary Measurement and Evaluation 3
EDUC 435 Secondary Curriculum Fundamentals 2
EDUC 436 Secondary Curriculum Fundamentals Practicum 1
EDUC 475 Seminar in Classroom Management 2
EDUC 476 Student Teaching I 5
EDUC 477 Student Teaching II 5
HLTH 440 Methods and Resources in Teaching Applied Sciences in Schools 2
HLTH 441 Methods and Resources in Teaching Applied Sciences in School Practicum 1
TOTAL HOURS: 144 hours minimum required; at least 55 hours must be 300-400 level.
* "C" or better is required in all courses
** These are approved General Education courses and may be counted in the Core Competency Requirements.
Biology Major (B.S.) Environmental Science - Teacher Licensure
General Education: Core Competency Requirements (59-63 hrs)
Core Courses in the Major (36 hrs)*
BIOL 224 General Biology I 4
BIOL 225 General Biology II 4
BIOL 207 General Botany 4
BIOL 303 Microbiology 4
BIOL 310 Ecology 4
BIOL 400 Biology Seminar 1
BIOL 410 Environmental Biology 4
BIOL ___ Elective (300-400 level) 4
BIOL ___ Elective (300-400 level) 3
Choose one of the following courses: 4
BIOL 320 Introduction to Entomology
BIOL 408 Animal Behavior
BIOL 418 Vertebrate Natural History
BIOL 419 Ornithology
Directed Courses (Required) (17-38 hrs)*
CHEM 121 General Chemistry I 4**
CHEM 122 General Chemistry II 4**
PHSC 210 Elements of Earth Science 3**
PHSC 211 Elements of Earth Science Lab 1
PSYC 210 Developmental Psychology 3**
PSYC 355 Statistics in Psychology 3
Choose one of the following groups: 3-9
MATH 126 Elementary Calculus for Business and Science **
OR
MATH 131 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I **
MATH 132 Calculus and Analytic Geometry II **
MATH 133 Calculus with Mathematica Lab **
Choose one of the following courses: 3
MATH 201 Introduction to Probability and Statistics **
MATH 211 Introduction to Statistical Analysis **
Choose one of the following groups: 8
PHYS 201 General Physics I **
PHYS 202 General Physics II **
OR
PHYS 231 University Physics I **
PHYS 232 University Physics II **
Teacher Licensure Requirements (31 hrs)
EDUC 125 Introduction to Education 1
EDUC 221 Content Area Reading and Differentiated Teaching and Learning (Secondary) 2
EDUC 235 Instructional Design: Secondary 1
EDUC 236 Instructional Design Practicum: Secondary 2
EDUC 240 Introduction to Applied Educational Technology Practicum 2
EDUC 360 Foundations of Education 2
EDUC 425 Secondary Measurement and Evaluation 3
EDUC 435 Secondary Curriculum Fundamentals 2
EDUC 436 Secondary Curriculum Fundamentals Practicum 1
EDUC 475 Seminar in Classroom Management 2
EDUC 476 Student Teaching I 5
EDUC 477 Student Teaching II 5
HLTH 440 Methods and Resources in Teaching Applied Sciences in Schools 2
HLTH 441 Methods and Resources in Teaching Applied Sciences in School Practicum 1
TOTAL HOURS: 143 hours minimum required; at least 50 hours must be 300-400 level.
* "C" or better is required in all courses
* These are approved General Education courses and may be counted in the Core Competency Requirements.

Biomedical Sciences Major (B.S.)

PURPOSE
The purpose of the Biomedical Sciences major is to prepare students for medical and related professional schools, graduate school and employment in the biomedical sciences. 

PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES
The student will be able to:

  1. Communicate scientific information both orally and in writing.
  2. Design and conduct biological experiments.
  3. Apply standards and principles of safe practice in the laboratory or field environment.
  4. Evaluate ethical issues in the life sciences in light of a Biblical/Christian worldview
  5. Demonstrate competence in the integration of the biological and physical sciences.
  6. Analyze and critique laboratory research results in the medical or molecular sciences.

Program of Study

Biomedical Sciences Major (B.S.)
General Education: Core Competency Requirements (59-63 hrs)
Courses in the Major (38-40 hrs)*
BIOL 224 General Biology I 4
BIOL 225 General Biology II 4
BIOL 301 Genetics 4
BIOL 400 Biology Seminar 1
BIOL 415 Cell Biology 4
Choose one of the following courses: 3-4
BIOL 313 Clinical Human Anatomy
BIOL 385 Advanced Human Physiology
Choose one of the following courses: 3-4
BCHM 450 Medical Biochemistry
BCHM 451 Biochemistry I
Choose four of the following courses: 15-16
BIOL 303 Microbiology
BIOL 305 Parasitology
BIOL 321 Comparative Anatomy of the Vertebrates
BIOL 330 Histology
BIOL 403 Embryology
BIOL 416 Comparative Animal Physiology
BIOL 420 Immunology
BCHM 452 Biochemistry II ***
BIOL 313 Clinical Human Anatomy ***
BIOL 385 Advanced Human Physiology ***
Directed Courses (Required) (15-33 hrs)*
CHEM 121 General Chemistry I 4**
CHEM 122 General Chemistry II 4**
CHEM 301 Organic Chemistry I 4
CHEM 302 Organic Chemistry II 4
Choose one of the following groups: 3-9
MATH 126 Elementary Calculus for Business and Science **
OR
MATH 131 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I **
MATH 132 Calculus and Analytic Geometry II **
MATH 133 Calculus with Mathematica Lab **
Choose one of the following groups: 8
PHYS 201 General Physics I **
PHYS 202 General Physics II **
OR
PHYS 231 University Physics I **
PHYS 232 University Physics II **
Free Electives (4-8 hrs)
TOTAL HOURS: 120 hours minimum required; at least 38 hours must be 300-400 level.
* “C” or better is required in all courses
** These are approved General Education courses and may be counted in the Core Competency Requirements.
*** If not already taken, BCHM 452, BIOL 313, and BIOL 385 can be used.

Cell and Molecular Biology Major (B.S.)

PURPOSE
The purpose of the Cell and Molecular Biology major is to prepare students for medical and related professional schools, graduate school, and employment in cell and molecular biology.

PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES
The student will be able to:

  1. Communicate scientific information both orally and in writing.
  2. Design and conduct biological experiments.
  3. Apply standards and principles of safe practice in the laboratory or field environment.
  4. Evaluate ethical issues in the life sciences in light of a Biblical/Christian worldview.
  5. Demonstrate competence in cell and molecular biology.
  6. Analyze and critique laboratory research results in the molecular sciences.

Program of Study

Cell and Molecular Biology Major (B.S.)
General Education: Core Competency Requirements (59-63 hrs)
Courses in the Major (36 hrs)*
BIOL 224 General Biology I 4
BIOL 225 General Biology II 4
BIOL 301 Genetics 4
BIOL 303 Microbiology 4
BIOL 400 Biology Seminar 1
BIOL 415 Cell Biology 4
BIOL 455 Molecular Techniques 3
BCHM 451 Biochemistry I 4
Choose two of the following courses: 8
BIOL 330 Histology
BIOL 403 Embryology
BIOL 420 Immunology
BCHM 452 Biochemistry II
Directed Courses (Required) (18-36 hrs)*
CHEM 121 General Chemistry I 4**
CHEM 122 General Chemistry II 4**
CHEM 301 Organic Chemistry I 4
CHEM 302 Organic Chemistry II 4
Choose one of the following groups: 3-9
MATH 126 Elementary Calculus for Business and Science **
OR
MATH 131 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I **
MATH 132 Calculus and Analytic Geometry II **
MATH 133 Calculus with Mathematica Lab **
Choose one of the following courses: 3
MATH 201 Introduction to Probability and Statistics **
MATH 211 Introduction to Statistical Analysis **
Choose one of the following groups: 8
PHYS 201 General Physics I **
PHYS 202 General Physics II **
OR
PHYS 231 University Physics I **
PHYS 232 University Physics II **
Free Electives (3-7 hrs)
TOTAL HOURS: 120 hours minimum required; at least 36 hours must be 300-400 level.
* “C” or better is required in all courses
** These are approved General Education courses and may be counted in the Core Competency Requirements.

Chemistry Major (B.S.)

PURPOSE
The purpose of the Chemistry major is to prepare students for graduate school and employment in chemistry.

PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES
The student will be able to:

  1. Communicate scientific information both orally and in writing.
  2. Assess experimental design and results obtained in the laboratory or extracted from the literature.
  3. Apply standards and principles of safe practice in the chemistry laboratory.
  4. Evaluate ethical issues in the sciences in light of a Biblical/Christian worldview.
  5. Demonstrate competence in the essential analytical, synthetic, and technical skills to work in the chemical laboratory.
  6. Formulate and solve problems in the principal areas of chemistry.

Program of Study

Chemistry Major (B.S.)
General Education: Core Competency Requirements (59-63 hrs)
Core Courses in the Major (48-49 hrs)*
CHEM 121 General Chemistry I 4
CHEM 122 General Chemistry II 4
CHEM 301 Organic Chemistry I 4
CHEM 302 Organic Chemistry II 4
CHEM 321 Analytical Chemistry 4
CHEM 322 Instrumental Analysis 4
CHEM 400 Chemistry Seminar 1
CHEM 461 Physical Chemistry I 3
CHEM 462 Physical Chemistry II 3
CHEM 465 Physical Chemistry I Lab 1
CHEM 466 Physical Chemistry II Lab 1
CHEM 471 Inorganic Chemistry 4
BCHM 451 Biochemistry I 4
Choose 2 From: 7/8
BCHM 452 Biochemistry II
CHEM 497 Special Topics
Directed Courses (Required) (13-24 hrs)*
MATH 131 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I 4**
MATH 132 Calculus and Analytic Geometry II 4**
MATH 133 Calculus with Mathematica Lab 1
MATH 211 Introduction to Statistical Analysis 3**
PHYS 231 University Physics I 4**
PHYS 232 University Physics II 4**
BIOL 224 General Biology I 4
Free Electives (0-1 hr)
TOTAL HOURS: 120 hours minimum required; at least 40 hours must be 300-400 level.
*“C” or better is required in all courses
**These are approved General Education courses and may be counted in the Core Competency Requirements.

Environmental Biology Major (B.S.)

PURPOSE
The purpose of the Environmental Biology major is to prepare students for graduate school and employment in the environmental sciences.

PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES
The student will be able to:

  1. Communicate scientific information both orally and in writing.
  2. Design and conduct biological experiments.
  3. Apply standards and principles of safe practice in the laboratory or field environment.
  4. Evaluate ethical issues in the life sciences in light of a Biblical/Christian worldview.
  5. Demonstrate competence in the environmental sciences.
  6. Analyze and critique field research results in the environmental sciences.

Program of Study

Environmental Biology Major (B.S.)
General Education: Core Competency Requirements (59-63 hrs)
Courses in the Major (39 hrs)*
BIOL 224 General Biology I 4
BIOL 225 General Biology II 4
BIOL 207 General Botany 4
BIOL 310 Ecology 4
BIOL 400 Biology Seminar 1
BIOL 410 Environmental Biology 4
BIOL ___ Elective (300-400 level) 4
ENVR 350 Environmental Science and Policy 3
ENVR 370 Geographic Information Systems (GIS) 3
Choose two of the following courses: 8
BIOL 303 Microbiology
BIOL 320 Introduction to Entomology
BIOL 408 Animal Behavior
BIOL 418 Vertebrate Natural History
BIOL 419 Ornithology
Directed Courses (Required) (17-35 hrs)*
CHEM 121 General Chemistry I 4**
CHEM 122 General Chemistry II 4**
ENVR 220 Physical Geology 3
ENVR 221 Physical Geology Laboratory 1
PSYC 355 Statistics in Psychology 3
Choose one of the following groups: 3-9
MATH 126 Elementary Calculus for Business and Science **
OR
MATH 131 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I **
MATH 132 Calculus and Analytic Geometry II **
MATH 133 Calculus with Mathematica Lab **
Choose one of the following courses: 3
MATH 201 Introduction to Probability and Statistics **
MATH 211 Introduction to Statistical Analysis **
Choose one of the following groups: 8
PHYS 201 General Physics I 4**
PHYS 202 General Physics II 4**
OR
PHYS 231 University Physics I **
PHYS 232 University Physics II **
Free Electives (1-5 hrs)
TOTAL HOURS: 120 hours minimum required; at least 30 hours must be 300-400 level.
* “C” or better is required in all courses.
** These approved General Education courses may be counted in Core Competency Requirements
NOTE: MATH 201/BUSI 230 or 211 is a prerequisite to BIOL 310. Application to Graduate School in Biology and Medical School may not usually be made without CHEM 302.

Zoo and Wildlife Biology Major (B.S.)

PURPOSE
The purpose of the Zoo and Wildlife Biology major is to continue to broaden our offerings to students interested in being stewards of God’s creation.  Zoos are heavily involved in conservation efforts associated with endangered species and students will be equipped to secure jobs in zoos to assist these types of efforts.  Similarly, rehabilitation centers are involved in stewardship issues by returning injured animals back into the wild. Students who are interested in science and have a passion for outdoors will also be interested in this major which will equip them for wildlife management graduate programs in natural resources.

PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES
The student will be able to:

  1. Communicate scientific information both orally and in writing.
  2. Design and conduct biological experiments.
  3. Apply standards and principles of safe practice in the laboratory or field environment.
  4. Evaluate ethical issues in the life sciences in light of a Biblical/Christian worldview.
  5. Demonstrate basic knowledge of vertebrate biology at the physiological, behavioral and ecological levels.
  6. Analyze and critique field or laboratory research results on vertebrate wildlife.

Program of Study

Zoo and Wildlife Biology Major (B.S.)
General Education: Core Competency Requirements (59-63 hrs)
Major: Zoo and Wildlife Biology (43-44 hrs)*
BIOL 207 General Botany 4
BIOL 224 General Biology I 4
BIOL 225 General Biology II 4
BIOL 303 Microbiology 4
BIOL 305 Parasitology 4
BIOL 310 Ecology 1 4
BIOL 400 Biology Seminar 1
BIOL 408 Animal Behavior 4
BIOL 416 Comparative Animal Physiology 4
BIOL 418 Vertebrate Natural History 4
Choose one of the following courses: 3
BIOL 495 Special Problems in Biology
BIOL 499 Internship
Choose one of the following courses: 3-4
BIOL 301 Genetics
BIOL 320 Introduction to Entomology
OR
BIOL 419 Ornithology
ENVR 370 Geographic Information Systems (GIS) 3
Directed Courses (Required) (14-29 hrs)*
CHEM 121 General Chemistry I 4**
CHEM 122 General Chemistry II 4**
MATH 121 College Algebra 3**
MATH 201 Introduction to Probability and Statistics 3
PSYC 101 General Psychology 3**
PSYC 210 Developmental Psychology 3**
PSYC 355 Statistics in Psychology 3
PSYC 365 Psychological Foundations of Learning 3
PSYC 380 Physiological Psychology 3
Free Electives (0-4 hrs)
TOTAL HOURS: 120 hours minimum required; at least 40 hours must be 300-400 level.
* “C” or better is required in all courses.
** These are approved General Education courses and may be counted in the Core Competency Requirements.

MATH 201 is a prerequisite to BIOL 310


Zoology Major (B.S.)

PURPOSE
The purpose of the Zoology major is to prepare students for veterinary, medical, and related professional schools, graduate school, and employment involving animals.

PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES
The student will be able to:

  1. Communicate scientific information both orally and in writing.
  2. Design and conduct biological experiments.
  3. Apply standards and principles of safe practice in the laboratory or field environment.
  4. Evaluate ethical issues in the life sciences in light of a Biblical/Christian worldview.
  5. Demonstrate competence in organismal biology at the molecular, physiological, and ecological levels.
  6. Analyze and critique field or laboratory research results in the zoological sciences.

Program of Study

Zoology Major (B.S.)
General Education: Core Competency Requirements (59-63)
Core Courses in the Major (39-40)*
BIOL 224 General Biology I 4
BIOL 225 General Biology II 4
BIOL 301 Genetics 4
BIOL 310 Ecology 4
BIOL 400 Biology Seminar 1
BIOL 416 Comparative Animal Physiology 4
Choose one of the following courses: 4
BIOL 303 Microbiology
BIOL 403 Embryology
BIOL 415 Cell Biology
BIOL 420 Immunology
BCHM 451 Biochemistry I
Choose one of the following courses: 4
BIOL 305 Parasitology
BIOL 320 Introduction to Entomology
BIOL 321 Comparative Anatomy of the Vertebrates
BIOL 371 Vertebrate Paleontology
BIOL 408 Animal Behavior
BIOL 418 Vertebrate Natural History
BIOL 419 Ornithology
BIOL ___ Elective (300-400 level) 10-11
Directed Courses (Required) (18-36 hrs)*
CHEM 121 General Chemistry I 4**
CHEM 122 General Chemistry II 4**
CHEM 301 Organic Chemistry I 4
CHEM 302 Organic Chemistry II 4
Choose one of the following groups: 3-9
MATH 126 Elementary Calculus for Business and Science **
OR
MATH 131 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I **
MATH 132 Calculus and Analytic Geometry II **
MATH 133 Calculus with Mathematica Lab **
Choose one of the following courses: 3
MATH 201 Introduction to Probability and Statistics **
MATH 211 Introduction to Statistical Analysis **
Choose one of the following groups: 8
PHYS 201 General Physics I **
PHYS 202 General Physics II **
OR
PHYS 231 University Physics I **
PHYS 232 University Physics II **
Free Electives (0-4 hrs)
TOTAL HOURS: 120 hours minimum required; at least 39 hours must be 300-400 level.
* “C” or better is required in all courses
** These approved General Education courses may be counted in Core Competency Requirements
NOTES: CHEM 121 and 122 are prerequisites to BIOL 301. CHEM 301 is a prerequisite or co-requisite to BIOL 415. MATH 201/BUSI 230 or 211 is a prerequisite to BIOL 310.

Biology Minor

Biology Minor (19 hrs)
BIOL 224 General Biology I 4
BIOL 225 General Biology II 4*
BIOL/BCHM/ENVR ___ Electives (300-400 level) 11

Biomedical Sciences Minor

Biomedical Sciences Minor (17-18 hrs)
BIOL 224 General Biology I 4
BIOL 225 General Biology II 4
BIOL 313 Clinical Human Anatomy 3
BIOL 385 Advanced Human Physiology 3
Choose one of the following courses: 3-4
BIOL 301 Genetics
BIOL 303 Microbiology
BIOL 305 Parasitology
BIOL 330 Histology
BCHM 450 Medical Biochemistry
BCHM 451 Biochemistry I

Chemistry Minor

Chemistry Minor (20 hrs)
CHEM 121 General Chemistry I 4
CHEM 122 General Chemistry II 4
CHEM 301 Organic Chemistry I 4
CHEM 302 Organic Chemistry II 4
CHEM 321 Analytical Chemistry 4

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Department of Health Professions

James Schoffstall, B.S., M.S.Ed., Ed.D., C.S.C.S., H.F.S., C.I.F.T., R.C.E.P., F.A.C.S.M.
Chair, Department of Health Profession
Director, Human Performance Lab
Professor of Health Professions

Eric Brubaker, B.S., M.S., Ed.D.
Associate Chair, Department of Health Professions
Director, Kinesiology Program
Assistant Professor of Health Professions

Annette Florence, B.S., M.P.H., Dr.P.H.
Director, Health Promotion Program
Associate Professor of Health Professions

Richard Lane, B.S., M.P.H., T&M M.D.
Director, Master of Public Health Program
Professor of Health Professions

J. Vance Pickard, B.S., M.A.T., Ed.D., A.T.C.
Director, Athletic Training Program
Associate Professor of Health Profession
s

David Titcomb, B.S., M.S.PT, D.P.T., HFS
Director, Exercise Science Program
Assistant Professor of Health Professions


Faculty

RESIDENTIAL - FULL-TIME
Professor
Farver; Florence, J.; Horton; Lane; Lennon; Linstra; Mahoney; Schoffstall, J.

Associate Professor
Florence A.; Gage; Henderson; House; Parson; Pickard

Assistant Professor
Brubaker; Eaken; Lowes; Martin, D.; Titcomb

Instructor
Kalian

Approved Clinical Preceptors
Beistline; Brown; Cops; Finke; Galley; Lamkin; Lindsey; Moore; Muhammad; Porter; Preusser; Schreiner; Tapken; Witt


PURPOSE
The Department of Health Professions faculty members are committed to preparing students in four majors: Athletic Training, Exercise Science, Health Promotion and Kinesiology. Each major leads to a Bachelor of Science degree.  Our objective is to encourage student growth in these disciplines from the Christian worldview in preparation for employment/graduate education as they pursue God’s purpose for their lives.

TEACHER LICENSURE
Teacher preparation and endorsement in health/physical education is available only through the Kinesiology Major within the Department of Health Professions and the Teacher Education Department. Those wishing to pursue teaching-related programs should seek information from the Director of Kinesiology/Physical Education and the Teacher Licensure Office in the School of Education. Licensure information is also available at http://www.liberty.edu/uguide.


Athletic Training Major (B.S.)

Athletic training is practiced by certified athletic trainers; health care professionals who collaborate with physicians to optimize activity and participation of patients and clients.  Athletic training encompasses the prevention, diagnosis, and intervention of emergency, acute, and chronic medical conditions involving impairment, functional limitations, and disabilities. Athletic Trainers have been recognized by the AMA (American Medical Association) as an allied health care profession since 1990 (www.nata.org, 2010).

Entry-level athletic training education uses a competency-based approach in both the classroom and clinical settings. Using a medical-based education model, athletic training students (ATS) are educated to provide comprehensive preventive services and care in six domains of clinical practice: prevention, clinical evaluation and diagnosis, immediate care, treatment, rehabilitation, and reconditioning; organization and administration; and professional responsibility. The educational requirements for Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training (CAATE)-accredited Athletic Training Programs (ATP) include not only cognitive (knowledge) and psychomotor (skill) content, but also a broad scope of foundational behaviors of professional practice, as well as a comprehensive clinical learning requirement that is embodied in the clinical proficiencies (professional, practice-oriented outcomes) as identified in the Athletic Training Educational Competencies and Clinical Proficiencies.

Athletic training programs, academic majors, are accredited by CAATE and lead to a bachelor’s or master’s degree.  Certification is granted by the Board of Certification, Inc. (BOC).  The Board of Certification conducts annual examination development meetings during which certified athletic trainers and recognized experts in the science of athletic training develop, review and validate examination items and problems.  The knowledge, skills and abilities required for competent performance as an entry-level athletic trainer fall into three categories:

  • Understanding, applying and analyzing;
  • Knowledge and decision-making; and
  • Special performance abilities.

The Bachelor of Science degree program in Athletic Training at Liberty University is nationally accredited through an independent process by CAATE. 

The ATP at Liberty University is designed to produce athletic training professionals who will impact the world of sports and health with the highest standards of knowledge, skill, and compassion. This program of study provides a thorough investigation into the profession of Athletic Training, using rigorous academic instruction in the classroom and intense hands-on clinical study working with area colleges and universities, high schools, and other affiliated sites.

PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES
The student will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate proper assessment techniques in the evaluation of athletic injuries.
  2. Determine the correct therapeutic treatment and rehabilitation protocol to promote return to activity.
  3. Communicate effectively to related medical and non-medical professionals within the athletic training setting.
  4. Apply research methods using evidence-based practices in the evaluation of athletic injuries and treatments.
  5. Demonstrate mastery of the knowledge and skills necessary to effectively perform as an entry-level Certified Athletic Trainer.

PROGRAM APPLICATION PROCEDURES
Acceptance to Liberty University does not guarantee acceptance into the Athletic Training Program. Entrance into the Athletic Training Program is competitive and students must gain entry into the program via the following process:

  • Pre-Professional: Students interested in becoming part of the Athletic Training Program at Liberty University should initially enroll in ATTR 200, along with available education requirements.  The second semester would then consist of enrolling in ATTR 210 and HLTH 216.
  • Provisional Acceptance: Applications for provisional admission should be submitted by April 15th each year. The criteria for provisional status can be found on the ATEP web site or from the Program Director.
  • Full Acceptance: Full acceptance will be based upon successful completion of Provisional status. Grades will be reviewed along with the clinical performance evaluation as determined by your Approved Clinical Preceptor (ACP).

Provisional Application Process
In addition to completing ATTR 200, students must meet the following criteria and provide the following information:

  • Candidates must indicate their intentions to apply to the program to the Program Director.
  • Candidates must be in good academic standing with the University and have a minimum GPA of 2.50.
  • Completion of application provided by the Program Director.
  • Complete transcripts.
  • Written paper about “Why I want to be a Certified Athletic Trainer.”
  • Medical history form signed by their family physician.  The form shall include an endorsement by the physician that states the student is physically able to meet the requirements of the program (See Technical Standards).
  • Vaccination records, including: Rubella, Tetanus, Mumps, Polio, and HBV vaccination. Proof of TB test within the last 12 months must be included
  • Meet the Technical Standards Policy for admission into the program.

For complete and updated information regarding application procedures, refer to the Liberty University ATEP web page at http://www.liberty.edu/Academic/Education/Sport/index.cfm?PID=85, or contact the Program Director. 

Any of the following conditions will automatically preclude the student from acceptance:

  • GPA is below 2.50.
  • Any grade below “C” in the ATTR courses.
  • Students not admitted will be notified and advised by the Program Director.
  • The accreditation standard regarding direct supervision within clinical rotations means that there is a limit to the number of students that can be accepted. As such, not all students meeting the minimum requirements may be accepted. If this is the case, total score will be utilized in determining final acceptance. Scores represent minimum provisional acceptance standards, and are no guarantee of final acceptance.
  • Students meeting the requirements but not accepted may be considered the following year.

Documentation following Provisional Acceptance:
Once a student is provisionally admitted to the program, the following documentation must be provided prior to the initial clinical rotation:

  1. Undergo annual Blood Borne Pathogen training;
  2. Student must be enrolled in ATTR 225/226 and ATTR 305/306.

Please note that due to the competitive nature of the program, that Provisional acceptance does not guarantee full acceptance into the program.  Additionally, Provisionally-accepted students must meet the Program Retention Standards in order to remain in the Program.

Full Acceptance Status
During the student’s Provisional semester, application for full acceptance to the program can be initiated.  Grades will be reviewed at the end of the semester, with final acceptance based on previous grades and successful completion of the following courses: ATTR 200; ATTR 210; ATTR 225/226; ATTR 305/306; BIOL 213/214; and HLTH 216.  Note that a minimum GPA of 2.75 is required for full admission into the program. Additionally, students must offer proof of the following:

  • Current First Aid and CPR certification.

Any of the following conditions will automatically preclude the student from acceptance:

  • GPA is below 2.75;
  • Any grade below “C” in the ATTR courses; or
  • Observational score of 4 or less.

At this point, the student may be admitted to the program.

Transfer Students
Students transferring to Liberty University who are interested in entering the Athletic Training Program must first declare this intention in writing to the Program Director. Due to the unique characteristics and background of each individual, a transfer student will be evaluated on an individual basis to determine his/her suitability for the program as well as an appropriate entry level.

It is highly likely that the competencies covered in the transferring courses may differ from those covered in Liberty University’s courses. However, if a transfer student feels certain competencies have been completed, the student must provide the Program Director written documentation from his/her former school’s Program Director. This documentation must include a weekly log of hours, a list of completed clinical experiences, competencies, and a statement signed by the Program Director verifying satisfactory completion of the competencies in question. All competencies must meet the standards set forth by the accrediting body. Any request for course credit transfer must be made to the Program Director.

PROGRAM RETENTION STANDARDS
Once admitted to the program, the student must demonstrate and maintain satisfactory academic and clinical progress as defined below:

  • Overall GPA: Athletic training students will maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75. Students falling below a 2.75 GPA will be placed on probation for one semester. If, after one semester of probation, the GPA remains below a 2.75, or falls below a 2.75 in any subsequent semester, the student will be suspended from the program.
  • GPA in Major: Students must achieve a minimum grade of “C” in all designated classes (right side of DCP). The student, with permission of the Program Director, may repeat one ATTR course in which the student failed to achieve the minimum grade of “C”. A second failure to receive a grade of “C” or better in any ATTR course will result in suspension from the program.
  • Students must complete BIOL 213/214 and 215/216 with a minimum grade of “C” in each section before enrolling in ATTR 400, 320 or 302.   Students who receive a grade of “D” will be allowed to continue enrollment for one additional semester if they are enrolled in the BIOL course in which they received the grade of “D”.  Students who receive a grade of “F” in any section of the required BIOL classes will be allowed to re-enter the program in the appropriate sequencing upon completion of this requirement.
  • Under extenuating circumstances, and with approval of the Program Director, students will be allowed to continue in the program (under probation status) if they fail to meet one specific section of the GPA requirement.  Issues will be considered on an individual basis and must constitute mitigating circumstances beyond the control of the student or program.
  • Course Sequencing: Students must complete each clinical and academic course in the order prescribed.
  • Codes of Conduct: Satisfactory citizenship and behavior must be demonstrated, per the University’s and the program’s codes of conduct as outlined in the Liberty Way and in the Athletic Training Program Handbook.  Students suspended from the University will be subject to athletic training faculty review as to continuation in the program.
    The athletic training faculty reserves the right to dismiss from the major, students who exhibit unprofessional or unethical behavior as outlined in the Program Handbook.
  • Guidelines for Appeal: Students may appeal decisions concerning their status in the Athletic Training Program. In order to do so, the student must submit a written appeal to the Program Director within one week of the notification in question. The documentation must include a detailed justification for the appeal. Upon receipt of the appeal, the athletic training faculty will meet to review the matter. The student will be advised in writing as to the outcome of that discussion within two weeks.

Program of Study

Athletic Training Major (B.S.)
General Education: Core Competency Requirements (59-63 hrs)
Courses in the Major (61 hrs) (“C” or better required)
ATTR 200 Introduction to Athletic Training 3
ATTR 210 Principles of Athletic Training 3
ATTR 221 Clinical Education I 2
ATTR 225 Clinical Kinesiology for Health Professionals 2
ATTR 226 Clinical Kinesiology for Health Professionals Laboratory 1
ATTR 300 Lower Extremity Injury Evaluation 3
ATTR 301 Lower Extremity Injury Evaluation Laboratory 1
ATTR 302 Upper Extermity Injury Evaluation 3
ATTR 303 Upper Extremity Injury Evaluation Laboratory 1
ATTR 305 Emergency Care for Athletic Training 3
ATTR 306 Emergency Care for Athletic Training Laboratory 1
ATTR 310 Therapeutic Modalities in Athletic Training 3
ATTR 311 Therapeutic Modalities Laboratory 1
ATTR 320 Clinical Education II 2
ATTR 321 Clinical Education III 2
ATTR 325 Evidence Based Research in Athletic Training 2
ATTR 400 Principles of Therapeutic Exercise and Rehabilitation 3
ATTR 402 Practical Applications in Therapeutic Exercise and Rehabilitation 3
ATTR 404 Medical Aspects of Athletic Training 3
ATTR 410 Administrative Aspects of Athletic Training 3
ATTR 420 Clinical Education IV 2
ATTR 421 Clinical Education V 2
ATTR 440 Senior Seminar in Athletic Training 2
EXSC 310 Physiology of Exercise 3
EXSC 311 Analysis of Human Movement 3
HLTH 333 Exercise and Sports Nutrition 3
KINE 225 Weight Training/Conditioning 1
Directed Courses (Required) (2-17 hrs)
MATH 201 Introduction to Probability and Statistics 3*
BIOL 213 Human Anatomy and Physiology I 3* **
BIOL 214 Human Anatomy and Physiology I Lab 1**
BIOL 215 Human Anatomy and Physiology II 3* **
BIOL 216 Human Anatomy and Physiology II Lab 1**
HLTH 216 Personal Health 3*
PSYC 101 General Psychology 3*
TOTAL HOURS: 122 hours minimum required; at least 49 hours must be 300-400 level.
*These approved General Education courses may be counted in Core Competency Requirements
**“C” or better required in these courses

Exercise Science Major (B.S.)

The Exercise Science program prepares students for careers in the health and fitness industry, as well as graduate studies in exercise physiology, physical therapy, occupational therapy, chiropractic, and other health professions. 

The Exercise Science program is designed to produce exercise science professionals who will impact the world of sports, fitness, and wellness for our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ.  The program will provide the student with the knowledge, skills, and abilities to assess, prescribe exercise for, and monitor clients in a variety of health, wellness, and fitness settings.  This program of study provides the student with a thorough immersion into the field of exercise science, by using a combination of classroom, laboratory, practicum, and internship experiences. 

The Bachelor of Science degree program in Exercise Science at Liberty University is nationally accredited by the Commission for the Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP).

PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES
The student will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate proficiency in the basic knowledge of an entry level Health Fitness Specialist as defined by the program’s accrediting body.
  2. Communicate effectively in the area of exercise science.
  3. Plan, implement, and evaluate exercise science related programming.
  4. Evaluate research data and apply research techniques.

PROGRAM APPLICATION PROCEDURES
Acceptance to Liberty University does not guarantee acceptance into the Exercise Science Program (ESP).  Entrance into the ESP can be competitive and students must gain entry into the program via the following process:

  • Provisional Acceptance:  Students interested in becoming part of the Exercise Science Program may initially declare Exercise Science as their major, but declaring Exercise Science as your major does not imply acceptance into the Exercise Science program.  Students interested in becoming part of the Exercise Science Program at Liberty University should initially enroll in BIOL 213/214 and the second semester enroll in BIOL 215/216; EXSC 101 can be completed in either the fall or spring semester of the freshman year, along with any other available education requirements as per the course sequencing sheet.  
  • Full Acceptance: Full acceptance into the Exercise Science program will be based upon the successful completion of all requirements during the provisional acceptance phase and selection by the Exercise Science admissions committee.  Application for acceptance can be made twice per year: by October 15th for spring acceptance and by March 15th for fall acceptance.

Process and Requirements for Full Acceptance
During the students Provisional Acceptance phase, application for full acceptance to the program can be initiated.  Grades will be reviewed at the end of the semester, with final acceptance contingent upon the successful completion of those courses.  The student must meet the following criteria and provide the following information/documentation:

  • Candidate must be in good academic standing with the University.
  • Must show proof of current student membership to the American College of Sports Medicine.
  • Must show proof of current First Aid and CPR certification.
  • The certification must be maintained throughout the student’s enrollment in the program.
    • Must include adult, child, and infant
    • Must have a ‘hands-on’ component
    • Must be from one of the following organizations:
      • American Red Cross
      • American Heart Association
      • National Safety Council
  • Cumulative GPA of 2.25 or better.
  • Have completed BIOL 213/214, BIOL 215/216, EXSC 101, and EXSC 310 with a grade of ‘C’ or better.
  • Completion of application provided by the program director.
  • Completion of the Exercise Science Student Confidentiality Agreement.
  • Complete transcripts.
  • Written paper on “Why I want to be in the Exercise Science Program.”

Transfer Students
Students transferring to Liberty University who are interested in entering the Exercise Science Program must follow the same process and procedures for entering the Exercise Science Program as outlined in the above section, ‘Program Application Procedures.  Additionally, students must take all 400 level courses residentially.  Courses at the 400 level cannot be transferred into the Exercise Science Program.

Fee and Expenses
In addition to university tuition and fees, students enrolled in the Exercise Science program may incur additional expenses.  These expenses include, but are not limited to: American College of Sports Medicine(ACSM) national and regional memberships, ACSM Health Fitness Specialist certification exam, first aid and CPR certifications, transportation costs associated with off-campus practicum, internship, and related experiences; TB (PPD) skin test, cost of medical examination and background check, if required by practicum or internship site.

Program Retention Standards
Once admitted to the program, the student must demonstrate and maintain satisfactory academic progress as defined below:

  • Overall GPA:  Students will maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.25.  Students falling below a 2.25 GPA will be placed on probation for one semester.   If, after one semester probation, the GPA remains below a 2.25, or falls below a 2.25 in any subsequent semester, the student will be dismissed from the program.
  • GPA in Major:  Students must achieve a “C” or better in all designated major courses (right side of the degree completion plan).  A student, with permission of the Program Director, may repeat ONE major course in which the student failed to achieve the minimum grade of “C”.  A second failure to receive a grade of “C” or better in any major course will result in dismissal from the program. 
  • Course sequencing:  Students must complete each major course in the order prescribed unless approved by the Program Director. 
  • Codes of Conduct: Satisfactory behavior must be demonstrated, per the University’s code of conduct as outlined in the Liberty Way
  • Guidelines for appeal: Students may appeal decisions concerning their status in the Exercise Science Program.  In order to do so, the student must submit a written appeal to the Program Director within one week of the notification in question.  The documentation must include a detailed justification for the appeal.  Upon receipt of the appeal, the Exercise Science faculty will meet to review the matter.  The student will be advised in writing as to the outcome of that discussion within two weeks.

Internship
Exercise Science students undertake an internship as the culminating experience of their degree program.  Students may choose from a variety of approved internship sites that provide exceptional opportunities for the student to apply their knowledge, skills, and abilities acquired throughout the Exercise Science program in a professional setting.  The internship also provides an opportunity for Exercise Science students to experience the careers that are available to them upon graduation. 

  • Prerequisite: The student has completed all Exercise Science course work and HLTH 333, with a grade of ‘C’ or better; have a minimum overall GPA of 2.25 or better; have achieved a minimum score of 480 on the American College of Sports Medicine’s Health Fitness Specialist exam, and turned in the exam scoring sheet to the Program Director; or consent of the Exercise Science Program Director.

Programs of Study

Exercise Science Major (B.S.) Fitness Specialist Concentration
General Education: Core Competency Requirements (59-63 hrs)
Core Courses in the Major (44 hrs)*
EXSC 101 Introduction to Exercise Science 1
EXSC 302 Exercise and Sports Injuries 2
EXSC 310 Physiology of Exercise 3
EXSC 311 Analysis of Human Movement 3
EXSC 320 Measurement and Evaluation in Health and Kinesiology 3
EXSC 340 Essentials of Strength Training and Conditioning 3
EXSC 350 Biomechanics 3
EXSC 351 Biomechanics Lab 1
EXSC 410 Applied Exercise Physiology 3
EXSC 411 Applied Exercise Physiology Lab 1
EXSC 421 Practicum 1
EXSC 433 Exercise Prescription for Special Populations 3
EXSC 460 Exercise Testing, Evaluation, and Prescription 3
EXSC 461 Exercise Leadership 3
EXSC 485 Health Fitness Specialist Workshop and Certification 1
EXSC 499 Internship in Exercise Science 4
HLTH 333 Exercise and Sports Nutrition 3
KINE 101 Physical Fitness 1
KINE ___ Elective (choose from KINE 210-240) 1
KINE 225 Weight Training/Conditioning 1
Directed Courses (Required) (2-11 hrs)*
BIOL 213 Human Anatomy and Physiology I 3**
BIOL 214 Human Anatomy and Physiology I Lab 1
BIOL 215 Human Anatomy and Physiology II 3**
BIOL 216 Human Anatomy and Physiology II Lab 1
HLTH 216 Personal Health 3**
Free Electives (12-16 hrs)
TOTAL HOURS: 121 hours minimum required; at least 40 hours must be 300-400 level.
* “C” or better is required in all courses
** These approved General Education courses may be counted in Core Competency Requirements
Exercise Science Major (B.S.) Pre-Professional Concentration
General Education: Core Competency Requirements (59-63 hrs)
Core Courses in the Major (58 hrs)*
CHEM 121 General Chemistry I 4
CHEM 122 General Chemistry II 4
EXSC 101 Introduction to Exercise Science 1
EXSC 310 Physiology of Exercise 3
EXSC 311 Analysis of Human Movement 3
EXSC 320 Measurement and Evaluation in Health and Kinesiology 3
EXSC 340 Essentials of Strength Training and Conditioning 3
EXSC 350 Biomechanics 3
EXSC 351 Biomechanics Lab 1
EXSC 410 Applied Exercise Physiology 3
EXSC 411 Applied Exercise Physiology Lab 1
EXSC 421 Practicum 1
EXSC 433 Exercise Prescription for Special Populations 3
EXSC 460 Exercise Testing, Evaluation, and Prescription 3
EXSC 461 Exercise Leadership 3
EXSC 485 Health Fitness Specialist Workshop and Certification 1
EXSC 499 Internship in Exercise Science 4
HLTH 333 Exercise and Sports Nutrition 3
KINE 101 Physical Fitness 1
KINE ___ Elective (choose from KINE 210-240) 1
KINE 225 Weight Training/Conditioning 1
PHYS 201 General Physics I 4
PHYS 202 General Physics II 4
Directed Courses (Required) (5-17 hrs)*
MATH 121 College Algebra 3**
BIOL 213 Human Anatomy and Physiology I 3**
BIOL 214 Human Anatomy and Physiology I Lab 1
BIOL 215 Human Anatomy and Physiology II 3**
BIOL 216 Human Anatomy and Physiology II Lab 1
HLTH 216 Personal Health 3**
MATH 201 Introduction to Probability and Statistics 3**
TOTAL HOURS: 122 hours minimum required; at least 38 hours must be 300-400 level.
* “C” or better is required in all courses
** These are approved General Education courses and may be counted in the Core Competency Requirements.

Health Promotion Major (B.S.)

The Health Promotion major prepares students for employment as adult health education specialists in the healthcare industry, voluntary agencies, business, and government or for graduate work for clinical health profession careers as well as public health and other health-related graduate programs. At the completion of the program, CHES students qualify and are encouraged to take the national Certified Health Education Specialist (C.H.E.S.) examination for certification.

Certified Health Education Specialist Concentration

PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES
The student will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate basic knowledge of personal and community health.
  2. Assess needs, assets and capacity for health education.
  3. Plan health education.
  4. Implement health education.
  5. Conduct evaluation and research related to health education.
  6. Administer and manage health education.
  7. Serve as a health education resource person.
  8. Communicate and advocate for health and health education.

Clinical Concentration

PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOME

  • The student will be able to demonstrate basic knowledge of personal and community health.

Programs of Study

Health Promotion Major (B.S.) CHES Concentration
General Education: Core Competency Requirements (59-63 hrs)
Core Courses in the Major (16 hrs)*
NURS 105 Medical Terminology 1
HLTH 330 Human Nutrition 3
HLTH 350 Introduction to Public and Community Health 3
HLTH 444 Principles of Epidemiology and Biostatistics 3
HLTH ___ Electives 6
Concentration Courses (32-34 hrs)*
HLTH 252 Drugs in Society 3
HLTH 301 Principles of Health Education 2
EXSC 310 Physiology of Exercise 3
EXSC 320 Measurement and Evaluation in Health and Kinesiology 3
HLTH 420 Principles of Behavior Change and Health Counseling 3
HLTH 452 Methods and Materials in Community Health Education 3
HLTH 453 Program Planning and Evaluation in Health Education 3
HLTH 488 Infectious Disease 3
HLTH 499 Professional Practice in Health Science 1 3
Choose one of the following: 3/3-1
HLTH 221 Applied Human Anatomy and Physiology I
OR
BIOL 213 Human Anatomy and Physiology I
BIOL 214 Human Anatomy and Physiology I Lab
Choose one of the following: 3/3-1
HLTH 222 Applied Human Anatomy and Physiology II
OR
BIOL 215 Human Anatomy and Physiology II
BIOL 216 Human Anatomy and Physiology II Lab
Directed Courses (Required) (2-17 hrs)**
BIOL 203 Introductory Microbiology 4
CHEM 107 Essentials of General and Organic Chemistry 4
HLTH 216 Personal Health 3
MATH 201 Introduction to Probability and Statistics 3
PSYC 101 General Psychology 3
Free Electives (7-11 hrs)
TOTAL HOURS: 120 hours minimum required; at least 32 hours must be 300-400 level.
* “C” or better required in all HLTH and BIOL courses.
** These approved General Education courses may be counted in Core Competency Requirements.

2.35 GPA is required

Health Promotion Major (B.S.) Clinical Concentration
General Education: Core Competency Requirements (59-63 hrs)
Core Courses in the Major (16 hrs)*
NURS 105 Medical Terminology 1
HLTH 330 Human Nutrition 3
HLTH 350 Introduction to Public and Community Health 3
HLTH 444 Principles of Epidemiology and Biostatistics 3
HLTH ___ Electives 6
Concentration Courses (30 hrs)*
CHEM 121 General Chemistry I 4
CHEM 122 General Chemistry II 4
CHEM 301 Organic Chemistry I 4
CHEM 302 Organic Chemistry II 4
MATH 121 College Algebra 3
MATH 126 Elementary Calculus for Business and Science 3
PHYS 201 General Physics I 4
PHYS 202 General Physics II 4
Directed Courses (Required) (2-18 hrs)**
MATH 201 Introduction to Probability and Statistics 3
PSYC 101 General Psychology 3
HLTH 216 Personal Health 3
Choose one of the following: 4/3-1
BIOL 224 General Biology I
OR
BIOL 213 Human Anatomy and Physiology I
BIOL 214 Human Anatomy and Physiology I Lab
Choose one of the following: 4/3-1
BIOL 225 General Biology II
OR
BIOL 215 Human Anatomy and Physiology II
BIOL 216 Human Anatomy and Physiology II Lab
Free Electives (9-13 hrs) [7 hrs must be upper level]
* “C” or better required in all HLTH and BIOL courses
** These are approved General Education courses and may be counted in the Core Competency Requirements.
TOTAL HOURS: 120 hours minimum required; at least 30 hours must be 300-400 level.

Kinesiology Major (B.S.)

PURPOSE
The Kinesiology degree program is designed to promote the development of a healthy, physically active Christ-centered lifestyle and prepare its graduates for the teaching profession.  This academic program will allow students to acquire the disciplinary knowledge of human movement and the requisite skills and competencies in their respective area of concentration.

Those students completing either of the Health and Physical Education concentrations will be given the knowledge and teaching skills necessary to design and implement developmentally appropriate motor/sport skill learning experiences in school settings.

PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES
The student will be able to:

  1. Apply health and physical education curricular content based on sound pedagogical principles and strategies for PreK-12 students.
  2. Plan and assess health and physical education lessons.
  3. Incorporate diverse learning styles and physical skill levels into lesson plans.
  4. Choose, administer, and evaluation assessment instruments to measure cognitive, affective, and psychomotor domains.
  5. Demonstrate teaching (communication) skills appropriate to K-12 students in physical education classes.
  6. Demonstrate motor/sports skills utilized education curricula.

Health and Physical Education Concentrations

These concentrations are designed to prepare students primarily as health and physical education teachers for grades PreK-12.  Students may choose whether or not to pursue Virginia teacher licensure.  Each is a combination of academic study and practical learning experiences dealing with teaching in both health and physical education instructional settings.

CPR/First Aid Requirement
Must show proof of current First Aid and CPR certification

  • Must include adult, child, and infant
  • Must have a ‘hands-on’ component
  • Must be from one of the following organizations:
  • American Red Cross
  • American Heart Association
  • National Safety Council

Programs of Study

Kinesiology Major (B.S.) Health and Physical Education Concentration (Non-Licensure)
General Education: Core Competency Requirements (59-63 hrs)
Core Courses in the Major (21 hrs) *
EXSC 310 Physiology of Exercise 3
EXSC 311 Analysis of Human Movement 3
EXSC 320 Measurement and Evaluation in Health and Kinesiology 3
HLTH 330 Human Nutrition 3
KINE 101 Physical Fitness 1
KINE 208 Motor Learning 3
KINE 209 Motor Learning Lab 1
KINE 225 Weight Training/Conditioning 1
KINE 333 Adapted Physical Activity 3
KINE 334 Adapted Physical Activity Lab 1
KINE ___ Elective (Choose from KINE 210-240) 1
Health and Physical Education Concentration Courses (29 hrs)
HLTH 252 Drugs in Society 3
HLTH 402 The School Health Program 3
HLTH 440 Methods and Resources in Teaching Applied Sciences in Schools 2
KINE 207 History and Foundations of Physical Education 2
KINE 210 Softball/Volleyball 1
KINE 211 Basketball/Soccer 1
KINE 212 Innovative Games 1
KINE 213 Racquet Sports 1
KINE 214 Tumbling and Rhythmic Activities 1
KINE 215 Track and Field/Flag Football 1
KINE 245 PE Observations in Schools 1
KINE 404 Administration and Organization of Physical Education, Exercise and Fitness 3
KINE 450 Elementary Physical Education Methods 3
KINE 451 Secondary Physical Education Methods 3
SMGT 300 Introduction to Coaching 3
Directed Courses (Required) (2-11 hrs)**
BIOL 213 Human Anatomy and Physiology I 3*
BIOL 214 Human Anatomy and Physiology I Lab 1
BIOL 215 Human Anatomy and Physiology II 3*
BIOL 216 Human Anatomy and Physiology II Lab 1
HLTH 216 Personal Health 3
Free Electives (5-9 hrs) [5 hrs must be upper level]
Additional Requirements for Major:
First Aid/CPR Certification
Swimming Proficiency
2.00 or higher cumulative GPA is required
TOTAL HOURS: 120 hours minimum required; at least 37 hours must be 300-400 level.
*“C” or better required
**These are approved General Education courses and may be counted in the Core Competency Requirements.
Teacher Licensure Requirements – Health and Physical Education (PreK – 12 Licensure)*
General Education Requirements (59-63 hrs)
Courses in the Major (21 hrs)
Health and Physical Education Concentration Courses (29 hrs)
Directed Courses (Required) 2-14 hrs)**
(“C” or better required in all BIOL courses)
BIOL 213 Human Anatomy and Physiology I 3
BIOL 214 Human Anatomy and Physiology I Lab 1
BIOL 215 Human Anatomy and Physiology II 3
BIOL 216 Human Anatomy and Physiology II Lab 1
PSYC 210 Developmental Psychology 3
HLTH 216 Personal Health 3
Teacher Licensure Requirements (22 hrs)
EDUC 125 Introduction to Education 1
EDUC 221 Content Area Reading and Differentiated Teaching and Learning (Secondary) 2
EDUC 240 Introduction to Applied Educational Technology Practicum 2
EDUC 360 Foundations of Education 2
HLTH 441 Methods and Resources in Teaching Applied Sciences in School Practicum 1
KINE 322 PE Student Aide: Elementary 1
KINE 322 PE Student Aide: Elementary 1
KINE 326 PE Student Aide: Secondary 1
Professional Semester
KINE 435 Seminar for Student Teachers 2
EDUC 476 Student Teaching I 5
EDUC 477 Student Teaching II 5
Additional Requirements for Major
First Aid/CPR Certification
Swimming Proficiency
* 2.50 or higher cumulative GPA is required. Honor students must take HONR 395 in Fall of Junior year.
** These approved General Education courses may be counted in Core Competency Requirements.
TOTAL HOURS: 133 hours minimum; 49 hours must be 300-400 level.

Health Promotion Minor

Health Promotion Minor (17 hrs)
BIOL 213 Human Anatomy and Physiology I 3
BIOL 214 Human Anatomy and Physiology I Lab 1
BIOL 215 Human Anatomy and Physiology II 3
BIOL 216 Human Anatomy and Physiology II Lab 1
HLTH 350 Introduction to Public and Community Health 3
HLTH 420 Principles of Behavior Change and Health Counseling 3
HLTH 453 Program Planning and Evaluation in Health Education 3

Kinesiology Minor

Kinesiology Minor (17 hrs)
KINE 101 Physical Fitness 3
KINE 208 Motor Learning 2
KINE 209 Motor Learning Lab 1
KINE 225 Weight Training/Conditioning 1
EXSC 302 Exercise and Sports Injuries 2
SMGT 300 Introduction to Coaching 3
KINE ___ Elective (300-400 level) 3
Choose one of the following courses: 2
KINE 210 Softball/Volleyball
KINE 211 Basketball/Soccer
KINE 212 Innovative Games
KINE 213 Racquet Sports
KINE 214 Tumbling and Rhythmic Activities
KINE 215 Track and Field/Flag Football

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Department of Nursing

Deanna C. Britt, R.N., B.S.N., M.S.N., Ph.D.
Chair, Department of Nursing
Professor of Nursing

Shanna Akers, R.N., A.D.N., B.S.N., M.S.N./M.B.A.
Director, RN to BSN Program
Assistant Professor of Nursing

Tonia Kennedy, B.S., M.S.N.
Director, Generic BSN Program
Associate Professor of Nursing

Sharon Kopis, R.N., A.S., B.S.N., M.S.N., Ed.D.
Director, Doctoral Programs in Nursing
Associate Professor of Nursing

Kimberly Little, B.S.N., M.S.N., Ph.D.
Director, MSN Program
Associate Professor of Nursing

Kathryn Miller, R.N., B.S.N., M.S.N.
Director, Simulation and Clinical Readiness
Assistant Professor of Nursing

Faculty

RESIDENTIAL - FULL-TIME
Professor
Britt; Goodrich; Sanders

Associate Professor
Kennedy; Kopis; Little; Robinette

Assistant Professor
Akers, S.; Bridge; Clarke; Drohn; Gregory; Harker; Harvey; Highton; Hutchinson; Kail; Kennedy; Miller, K.; Mills; Page; Rasberry, T.; Turner; Woody

DISTANCE EDUCATION - FULL-TIME
Professor
Miller, L.

Assistant
Brickhill; Jessee

Instructor
Baldwin; McCombie; Rawlins; Washburn


PURPOSE
The purpose of the Liberty University Department of Nursing is to prepare baccalaureate level nurses who are committed to Christian ethical standards and view nursing as a ministry of caring based on the Benner theoretical framework. The nursing curriculum is built upon a foundation from the arts, sciences, and the Bible, and focuses on the use of the nursing process to guide the acquisition of nursing knowledge, build strong clinical skills, and develop the foundation necessary for a sound work ethic.


Nursing Major (B.S.N.)

PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES
The student will be able to:

  1. View nursing as a ministry of demonstrating Christ’s love to hurting people of all religions, creeds, and cultures.
  2. Provide and coordinate nursing care for individuals, families and groups within the community.
  3. Utilize critical thinking/problem solving skills/evidenced base practice in determining nursing interventions and applying therapeutic skills.
  4. Demonstrate leadership skills in collaboration with clients, other professionals and groups within the community for the purpose of promoting, maintaining, and restoring health.
  5. Apply a personal and professional Christian value system, based on biblical principles, to ethical issues related to the practice of professional nursing.
  6. Value the need for ongoing personal and professional development through both formal and informal learning experiences.
  7. Foster professional level competencies in writing and communication and computer literacy.

ACCREDITATION AND LICENSURE
The Department of Nursing is fully accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE), and is approved by the Virginia State Board of Nursing.


APPLICATION TO THE DEPARTMENT OF NURSING
A prospective student applies for candidacy to the nursing major during the second semester of the freshman year. Applicants are considered for candidacy to the nursing major following enrollment in CHEM 107, BIOL 213/214, 215/216, NURS 101, 105 and NURS 215. Students must complete BIOL 211, 212, CHEM 107, NURS 101, 105 and 215 with grades of “C” or better, (grades of “A” or “B” in science course are preferred) and have a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.00.  A personal interview with a nursing faculty member may also be required. The faculty reserves the right to refuse admission into the program. Acceptance by Liberty University does not guarantee acceptance into the nursing major.

Retention and Progression
Policies related to retention and progression are outlined in the annual Liberty University Nursing Student Handbook.

Clinical Prerequisites
Each student must secure uniforms, name pin, stethoscope, liability insurance, immunizations, background check, and current CPR certification prior to the first clinical experience.

Transportation
Nursing students are responsible for transportation to and from clinical settings. Car pools are encouraged as a means of defraying transportation costs for the individual student.

Physical Examination
A physical examination including a TB test, Rubella Titer, documentation of Hepatitis B vaccinations, and all childhood immunizations is required prior to the first day of class.

Accelerated Program
An accelerated summer program is available for students who have already completed one to two years of college work before deciding to enter the nursing major. Students who meet the admission criteria can finish the nursing requirements in two years.

Certificate Programs
Senior level students have an opportunity to specialize in a specific field of nursing by participating in one of two certificate programs:

  • Critical Care Nursing
  • Cross Cultural Nursing

Selected students complete extra classes and clinical experiences so that they are able to enter the workplace with a broader knowledge base and more highly developed clinical skills than other new graduates.

Advanced Placement
Registered nurses and licensed practical nurses may obtain advanced placement by applying to the RN track of the program. A registered nurse student is a nurse who:

  1. Has graduated from an accredited program leading to an  associate’s degree or a hospital diploma;
  2. Had three months of nursing practice as a registered nurse within the past five years or completion of a refresher course before the senior year; and
  3. Has been admitted to Liberty University.

Career Opportunities

Hospital Nursing
Critical Care Orthopedics
Emergency Department Out Patient Surgery
Flight Nurse Pediatrics
Medical Rehabilitation
Obstetrics Surgical
Oncology  
Community Nursing
Home Health Outpatient Clinics
Missionary Nursing Physicians Office
Occupational Health Public Health
Red Cross  
Armed Services
Air Force Navy
Army  
With Addtional Education
Clinical Nurse Specialist Nurse Educator
Nurse Anesthetist Nurse Practitioner

Program of Study

Nursing Major (B.S.N.)
General Education: Core Competency Requirements (54 hrs)
Courses in the Major (62 hrs)
NURS 101 Introduction to Nursing 1
NURS 105 Medical Terminology 1
NURS 115 Sciences in Nursing 3
NURS 200 Nursing Process Application 2
NURS 210 Health Assessment 3
NURS 221 Fundamentals in Nursing 4
NURS 225 Research in Nursing 3
NURS 301 Strategies for Adult Health Care I 5
NURS 302 Strategies for Adult Health Care II 5
NURS 305 Pharmacology 2
NURS 306 Pharmacology II 2
NURS 352 Caring for the Childbearing Family I 4
NURS 353 Caring for the Childbearing Family II 4
NURS 440 Strategies for Community Health Care 5
NURS 445 Population Health 3
NURS 451 Strategies for Mental Health Care 3
NURS 460 Advanced Strategies for Adult Health Care 4
NURS 490 Leadership/Management in Nursing 5
Choose one of the following courses: 3
NURS 316 Global Health Nursing Field Experience
NURS 415 Cross-Cultural Nursing
NURS 416 Preceptorship in Nursing
NURS 417 Crisis Nursing
NURS 418 Gerontological Nursing
NURS 419 Strategies for End of Life Care
NURS 420 Comprehensive Pain Management
NURS 465 Advanced Strategies for the Critically Ill
NURS 466 Advanced Critical Care II
Directed Courses (Required) (18 hrs)
BIOL 203 Introductory Microbiology 4
BIOL 215 Human Anatomy and Physiology II 3*
BIOL 216 Human Anatomy and Physiology II Lab 1*
CHEM 107 Essentials of General and Organic Chemistry 4*
HLTH 330 Human Nutrition 3
PHIL 380 Biomedical Ethics 3
Additional Requirements for Major:
ATI Predictor Test
TOTAL HOURS: 134 hours minimum required; at least 51 hours must be 300-400 level.
* “C” or better is required

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Department of Psychology

Daniel Logan, B.S., M.A., Ed.D.
Chair, Department of Psychology
Associate Professor of Psychology

Marlene Carrilho, B.S., M.A.
Chair, Department of Psychology
Instructor of Psychology

Kevin Conner, B.S., M.A., M.Div.
Chair, Department of Psychology
Instructor of Psychology

Ester Warren, B.S., M.Ed., Ed.S.
Chair, Department of Psychology
Instructor of Psychology

Faculty

RESIDENTIAL - FULL-TIME
Professor
Anderson, L., Gadomski, Jennings

Associate Professor
Barclay; Boothe; Brown, J.; Freyre; Logan; Scott; Sites

Assistant Professor
Cole; Donovan; Friberg; Logan; Magnuson; Vess; Warren, S.; Wilmouth

Instructor
Carrilho; Conner, K.; Warren, E.

DISTANCE EDUCATION -  FULl-TIME
Assistant Professor
Crawford; Geyer; Straub

Instructor
Baker; Bernard, J.; Bouman; Brown, J.K.; Bruce; Chamberlin; Clark, M.; Cobb; Cooper; Corsini, G.; Cox, T.; Curran; Deneen; Early, C.; Gibson; Hain; Harris, R.; Haynes; Johnson, H.; Kennedy, J.; Leadem, K.; Leadem, M.; Matz; Miraldi; Moroz; Neace; Nelson, R.; Peniche; Pinder; Pratt; Rife; Rogers, T.; Rosewell; Samms; Shimel; Sosin, D.; Starnes; Sullivan, D.; Thornhill, C.; Tyson; Varland; Weller; Wiedman; Williams, T.; Wilson, R.; Winn


PURPOSE
The Psychology Department provides a baccalaureate degree for both the resident and online programs. These programs seek both to transmit and expand knowledge, as well as to provide opportunities for research and service. The Department consists of a community of persons who are voluntarily linked in the pursuit of knowledge, providing a reasoned presentation of the academic disciplines in relation to the Christian faith. The Department’s purpose is to communicate Christian values, academic content and requisite skills—all of which prepare persons for a life-long process of learning and serving. 

The purpose is carried out for resident students, all of whom have indicated their agreement with Liberty’s purpose, through a rigorous academic program and a structured socio-religious environment. It is carried out for online students, who may or may not espouse Liberty’s purpose, in a comparable academic program but without the socio-religious structure of the resident community.

PSI CHI HONOR SOCIETY
Advisors: Dr. Marilyn Gadomski and Dr. Dennis Jennings
Psi Chi is the International Honor Society for Psychology. Membership in Psi Chi is an earned honor which is for life. A permanent record of your membership is preserved at the Psi Chi National Office and may be used for reference purposes such as applications for graduate school and jobs. 

Psi Chi inductees are eligible to order and wear the Psi Chi honor cord at graduation. Copies of Psi Chi’s magazine, Eye on Psi Chi, are available in the main PSYC office in DeMoss Hall. Psi Chi members are eligible to present research papers/posters at Psi Chi programs held at national and regional conventions. In addition, members may participate in Psi Chi’s undergraduate and graduate research award competitions, and undergraduate members may submit their research for publication in the Psi Chi Journal of Undergraduate Research. The names of new members and activities of chapters are published in Eye on Psi Chi.

The Liberty Psi Chi chapter inducts new members once in the fall and once in the spring.  Applications for the fall induction should be submitted between September 1 & October 15, and applications for the spring induction should be submitted between January 15 and February 28. To apply for membership, please fill out an application and return it and a check for $55 to the Psychology office in DM 4008, or mail it to the address listed in the application.  Do not submit applications by email.  To be eligible to join the Liberty chapter of Psi Chi, students must meet the following requirements:

  1. Registration for major or minor standing in Psychology.
  2. Completion of at least 45 hours of college courses (this can include transfer courses).
  3. Completion of at least 9 semester hours of Psychology courses with a PSYC prefix, excluding PSYC 101 and 210.
  4. GPA of at least 3.50 in Liberty Psychology courses with a PSYC prefix, excluding PSYC 101 and 210.
  5. Overall GPA of at least 3.35.
  6. Check for $55 that covers the lifetime Psi Chi national membership fee and Liberty’s one-time dues (there are no additional annual dues).
  7. Application must be submitted at least 2 months prior to student's graduation date.

You may email the current Psi Chi officers at psichi@liberty.edu for additional information.

DANIEL’S PROGRAM
The Daniel’s program was designed for students who have the desire and ability to pursue graduate training in psychology.  Students in this program work on applied research projects under the supervision of faculty members, and have the opportunity to present findings at conferences and submit articles for publication.  Students can apply for this program after completing PSYC 255, Introduction to Research, and are selected on the basis of their grades, Christian character, and faculty recommendations.  This program provides students the opportunity to develop the research skills and experience that will improve their ability to gain acceptance and funding in competitive graduate programs.


Psychology Major (B.S.)

PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES
The student will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate competence in the major concepts in psychology.
  2. Interpret research data accurately.
  3. Use critical thinking to solve problems related to behavior and mental processes.
  4. Evaluate psychological concepts/theories as they relate to biblical thought.
  5. Communicate effectively in written, oral, and technological formats.
  6. Recognize and respect the complexity of socio-cultural and international diversity.

Counseling, Clinical, or Research Concentration

  • The student will be able to create advanced research designs.

Counseling and Human Development Concentration

  • The student will be able to evaluate developmental issues across the lifespan.

Human Services Concentration

  • The student will be able to evaluate crisis intervention techniques and issues.

Career Opportunities

Counseling, Clinical, or Research Concentration
This concentration is designed for students pursuing a career that requires a doctoral degree in counseling, psychology, educational psychology, or related field. While this concentration does prepare students for graduate study in clinical psychology and counseling, it is also excellent preparation for other areas such as industrial/organizational, applied or quantitative psychology.  This concentration is also the best choice for those students planning to apply to a competitive and selective master’s program in any area of psychology. 

Counseling and Human Development Concentration
This concentration is designed for students seeking a career as a licensed counselor or psychologist that requires a master’s degree in a licensure track graduate program (e.g., Liberty’s M.A. in Professional Counseling). Graduates have pursued careers as professional counselors (including private practice), school counselors, and school psychologists.  This concentration is also a good choice for students seeking employment in child development clinics, child or adult treatment centers, adult residential centers, or in any entry level position that requires only a bachelor’s degree.

Human Services Concentration
The Human Services concentration provides students with a foundation of practical skills to prepare them to enter the career force directly after graduation or to pursue a Master’s degree in Social Work or Human Services. This concentration equips students with an understanding of various professional skills and research methods as well as training for counseling diverse populations.


Programs of Study

Psychology Major (B.S.)
General Education: Core Competency Requirements (59-63 hrs)
Core Courses in the Major (24 hrs)
PSYC 255 Introduction to Research 3
PSYC 312 Social Psychology 3
PSYC 341 Psychology of Personality 3
PSYC 354 Statistics for the Social Sciences 3
PSYC 355 Statistics in Psychology 3
PSYC 430 Abnormal Psychology 3
PSYC ___ Elective 3
Choose one of the following courses: 3
PSYC 498 Senior Project
PSYC 499 Internship
Concentration Courses (24 hrs)
Directed Courses (Required) (0-9 hrs)*
BIOL 102 Principles of Human Biology 3
PSYC 101 General Psychology 3
PSYC 210 Developmental Psychology 3
Free Electives (9-13 hrs)
*These are approved General Education courses and may be counted in the Core Competency Requirements.
Psychology Major (B.S.) Counseling, Clinical, or Research Concentration
General Education: Core Competency Requirements (59-63 hrs)
Core Courses in the Major (24 hrs)
Concentration Courses (24 hrs)
PSYC 351 Multicultural Counseling and Research Issues 3
PSYC 365 Psychological Foundations of Learning 3
PSYC 371 Theories in Counseling and Psychotherapy 3
PSYC 380 Physiological Psychology 3
PSYC 401 History and Systems of Psychology 3
PSYC 421 Psychological Measurement 3
PSYC 440 Experimental Design in Research: Application and Construction 3
PSYC ___ Elective 3
Directed Courses (Required) (1-10 hrs)*
BIOL 102 Principles of Human Biology 3*
BIOL 104 Principles of Human Biology Laboratory 1
PSYC 101 General Psychology 3*
PSYC 210 Developmental Psychology 3*
Free Electives (8-12 hrs)
TOTAL HOURS: 120 hours minimum required; at least 39 hours must be 300-400 level.
*These are approved General Education courses and may be counted in the Core Competency Requirements.
Psychology Major (B.S.) Counseling and Human Development Concentration
Concentration Courses (24 hrs)
PSYC 320 Behavior Management 3
PSYC 365 Psychological Foundations of Learning 3
PSYC 371 Theories in Counseling and Psychotherapy 3
PSYC 421 Psychological Measurement 3
PSYC ___ Elective 3
Choose three of the following courses: 9
PSYC 221 Psychology of Childhood
PSYC 231 Psychology of Adolescence
PSYC 235 Psychology of Adulthood
PSYC 336 Gerontology
TOTAL HOURS: 120 hours minimum required; at least 36 hours must be 300-400 level.
Psychology Major (B.S.) Human Services Concentration
Concentration Courses (24 hrs)
PSYC 317 Crisis Intervention 3
PSYC 361 Marriage and Family 3
PSYC 371 Theories in Counseling and Psychotherapy 3
PSYC 405 Group Dynamics 3
PSYC 421 Psychological Measurement 3
Choose one of the following courses: 3
PSYC 221 Psychology of Childhood
PSYC 231 Psychology of Adolescence
PSYC 235 Psychology of Adulthood
Choose one of the following courses: 3
PSYC 351 Multicultural Counseling and Research Issues
SOCI 340 Human Societies: A Global View
Choose one of the following courses: 3
PSYC 305 Overview of Theory and Treatment of Substance Abuse
PSYC 320 Behavior Management
TOTAL HOURS: 120 hours minimum required; at least 39 hours must be 300-400 level.

Psychology Minor

Psychology Minor (15 hrs)
PSYC 101 General Psychology 3
PSYC 210 Developmental Psychology 3
PSYC ___ Electives (at least 6 hours 300-400 level) 9

Sociology Minor

PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOME

  • The student will be able to evaluate social dynamics within families and societies.
Sociology Minor (15 hrs)
SOCI 200 Introduction to Sociology 3
SOCI 201 Social Problems 3
Choose three of the following courses: (No more than two courses with a PSYC prefix) 9
SOCI 313 Social Organizations
SOCI 340 Human Societies: A Global View
SOCI 349 Sociology of Disability
SOCI 497 Special Topics in Sociology
SOWK 200 Introduction to Social Work and Human Services
PSYC 305 Overview of Theory and Treatment of Substance Abuse
PSYC 312 Social Psychology
PSYC 317 Crisis Intervention
PSYC 336 Gerontology
PSYC 361 Marriage and Family
PSYC 497 Special Topics in Psychology
PSYC 499 Internship


Highlighted text indicates a change from the official version of the catalog.