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Graduate Catalog 2013-2014

College of Arts and Sciences

Administration

Roger Schultz, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
Dean, College of Arts and Sciences
Professor of History

Carey Roberts, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
Associate Dean, College of Arts and Sciences
Chair, Department of History
Professor of History


PURPOSE
The purpose of the College of Arts and Sciences is to develop Christ-centered lifelong learners who think critically, live morally, and act skillfully to make contributions in their workplaces, communities, and around the world.   They will be equipped with the essential knowledge, values, and skills in disciplines focused on philosophical, cultural, and scientific achievements.  Graduates from the College of Arts and Sciences will be able to apply, communicate, and expand the knowledge they have gained as they seek to glorify God in fulfilling the Great Commission.

Departments of the College include English and Modern Languages, Family and Consumer Sciences, Mathematics and Physics, History, and Philosophy.  The College offers learning opportunities in American Sign Language, family and consumer sciences, fashion merchandising, child development, interior design, Chinese, English, French, Spanish, Teaching English as a Second/Foreign Language, geography, history, humanities, linguistics, mathematics, military science, philosophy, physical science, physics, and social sciences.


DEGREE COMPLETION PLANS (DCP)
Degree Completion Plans for graduate programs offered by the College of Arts and Sciences are available online from the Registrar’s webpage at http://www.liberty.edu/dcps.


Department of English and Modern Languages

Matthew D. Towles, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
Chair, Department of English and Modern Languages
Associate Professor of English

Mark R. Harris, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
Director, Master of Arts in English Program
Associate Professor of English


Faculty

RESIDENTIAL – FULL-TIME
Professor
Adu-Gyamfi; Ayres; Gribbin; Heady; McClelland; Nutter; Prior; Schmidt; Woodard

Associate Professor
Baggett; Curtis; Harris; Muller; Towles, M.

Assistant Professor
Kim, J.


Master of Arts in English (M.A.)

PURPOSE
The Master of Arts in English is a 36-hour, graduate-level degree in English language and literature, practical in its reading and writing about a broad spectrum of texts in English, theoretical in its observation of texts through the diverse critical lenses of current literary theory, philosophical in its investigation of the meaning of literary texts in the human experience, professional in its preparation for further work in the academic disciplines as well as to a wide variety of professional disciplines to which a studied understanding of the human experience is valuable.  The purpose of the program is to equip students, within a Christian, biblical worldview, to pursue further studies in English language arts at the doctoral level, as well as to prepare for careers related to the field.  The M.A. in English will provide students with the opportunity to study the texts of literature in English and the western tradition, the critical tradition pertaining to these texts, and critical approaches to interpreting texts, as well as a background in research methods and the practice of writing and in the linguistic characteristics of English throughout its history, offered in advanced degree programs in English.

PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES      
The student will be able to:

  1. Discuss English language and literature and critical theory in a manner appropriate to the field.
  2. Produce in-depth research using appropriate scholarly methods and resources.
  3. Write in a professional and scholarly manner.
  4. Evaluate the relationships between literary works and their contexts.
  5. Analyze literary texts, theory, and history through a Christian worldview.

PROGRAM SPECIFIC ADMISSION PROCEDURES
In addition to the general admission requirements, specific admission procedures to the M.A. in English are as follows:

  1. Earned baccalaureate degree or its equivalent from an institution accredited by an agency recognized by the U.S. Department of Education (e.g., SACS, TRACS, ABHE, etc.)
  2. Applicants should hold a 3.00 GPA for undergraduate study.  Applicants close to the requirement may be considered for enrollment in the program on a cautionary basis but will not qualify for Graduate Assistantship positions.  These students must take and pass GRST 500 – Introduction to Graduate Writing in their first semester.
  3. Applicants must have completed a bachelor’s degree, with the completion of at least 15-18 hours in upper-division English by the end of their second semester of enrollment.
  4. Applicants are required to submit current GRE scores.
  5. Applicants must submit a writing sample explaining why they wish to pursue an advanced degree in English.
  6. Applicants must submit two professional letters of recommendation.
  7. An 8-10 page academic writing sample.
  8. TOEFL (if applicable)

TRANSFER CREDIT
Students may transfer up to two graduate-level courses (total of 6 credit hours) from an accredited institution subject to department approval.  In order to transfer credit, students must have earned the minimum grade of B-, and courses must have been completed within 10 years of the start date of the program. Credits from a prior degree on the same academic level earned through Liberty University are considered transfer credits.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
In addition to other regulations governing graduation as state in the Liberty University catalog, M.A. in English graduates must meet the following requirements:

  • Complete 36 total hours.
  • A minimum of 30 hours must be completed through Liberty University, not to include credits from a prior degree earned through Liberty.
  • A maximum of six (6) hours of transfer credit, including credit from a degree on the same academic level previously earned through Liberty, may be applied to the degree.
  • Maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.00.
  • No more than two grades of C may be applied to the degree. (includes grades of C+ & C-)
  • No grades of D may be applied to the degree. (includes grades of D+ & D-)
  • Possess reading proficiency in a language other than English
  • Complete the M.A. in English within five years
  • All Resident students are required to enroll in and pass GRST 500 in their first semester.
  • Complete the thesis or non-thesis track within the M.A. in English
  • Submit a Graduation Application to the Registrar’s Office at the beginning of the final semester.

Program of Study

(M.A.) Master of Arts in English (36 hrs)
Program Option: Resident Format
Core Courses (12 hrs)
ENGL 501 Chrisitian Poetics 3
ENGL 503 Bibliography and Research 3
ENGL 505 Advanced Literary Criticism 3
Choose one of the following courses:
ENGL 507 Teaching Composition 1 3*
ENGL 554 Teaching Writing Across the Curriculum  2 3*
Literature Courses (12 hrs)
Choose four of the following courses:
ENGL 510 Studies in Ancient Literature/Classics 3
ENGL 511 Chrisitan Authors 3
ENGL 512 Seminar in British Authors 3
ENGL 515 Studies in British Literature 3
ENGL 517 Old English Literature 3
ENGL 523 Shakespeare 3
ENGL 529 Studies in American Literature 3
ENGL 532 Seminar in American Authors 3
ENGL 537 African-American Literature 3
ENGL 595 Directed Research 3
ENGL 613 Contemporary and Postmodern Literature 3
ENGL 656 Studies in World Literatures 3
Elective Courses (6 hrs)
Choose two of the following courses or substitute any core or literature course not already taken:
ENGL 513 Linguistics 3
ENGL 533 Advanced Grammar 3
ENGL 550 Nonfiction Writing 3
ENGL 551 Poetry Writing 3
ENGL 552 Fiction Writing 3
ENGL 562 Text Analysis 3
ENGL 564 English as a Global Language 3
Thesis or Elective Courses (6 hrs)
ENGL 689 Thesis Proposal and Research 3 3*
ENGL 690 Thesis Defense 3

* For GSA's

* For Non-GSA's

* Any thesis student who is not ready for enrollment in ENGL 690 after completing ENGL 689, may be required, as determined by the student's Chair, to repeat ENGL 689 until deemed by ready for enrollment in ENGL 690


Department of History

Samuel C. Smith, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
Director, History Graduate Program
Professor of History

Carey Roberts, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
Associate Dean, College of Arts and Sciences
Chair, Department of History
Professor of History


Faculty

RESIDENTIAL – FULL-TIME
Professor
Roberts; Schultz; Snead, Smith, S. C.

Associate
Davis; Mann; Melton; Saxon

Assistant
Smith, C.


Master of Arts in History (M.A.)

PURPOSE
This program complies with regional accreditation standards, and is designed to promote superior academic scholarship and professionalism for those students continuing their education or entering vocations in the field of history.  It seeks to prepare students to understand history's place in God's plan and to meet the challenges posed by history vocations.

PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES
The student will be able to:

  1. Apply a Christian worldview in their study of history;
  2. Demonstrate knowledge in research methodology;
  3. Analyze historiographical positions at a graduate level;
  4. Communicate effectively in written and oral form.

PROGRAM SPECIFIC ADMISSION PROCEDURES
In addition to the general admission requirements, specific admission procedures to the Master of Arts in History program are as follows:

  1. Applicants should apply at least one semester in advance of enrollment.  Students interested in being considered for a Graduate Assistantship starting in the Fall semester should apply by February 15 and for those starting in the Spring semester by November 15.
  2. Official transcripts indicating successful completion of a baccalaureate degree program from an institution accredited by an agency recognized by the U.S. Department of Education (e.g., SACS, TRACS, ABHE, etc.) must be mailed directly from the Registrar of the college(s) attended to the Office of Graduate Admissions.
  3. Applicants should hold a cumulative GPA of 3.00 on a scale of 4.00 for undergraduate study.  Applicants who do not meet this requirement may be considered for enrollment in the program on a probationary basis but may not qualify for assistantship positions until a 3.00 average is earned in graduate study.  These students are required to take and pass GRST 500 – Introduction to Graduate Writing in their first semester.
  4. The Department of History will give preference to applicants who have completed a B.S. or B.A. in History or a related discipline before their first semester of enrollment.  However, the Department will also consider students with degrees from other disciplines.
  5. Applicants should have at least 30 semester hours in undergraduate history courses.  Applicants with between 18 and 29 hours in undergraduate history courses may have to take additional history courses beyond those required for the M.A. degree. Those with less than 18 semester hours must take additional history courses beyond those required for the M.A.
  6. Applicants are required to submit current GRE scores. Generally, applicants are expected to score at least a 155 (verbal/quantitative) and 3.5 (analytical writing).
  7. Applicants must submit a 10-12 page typed sample of a research paper with their application.  The paper should use the Turabian (Chicago Manual) Style for citations and formatting.
  8. Applicants must submit a 300- to 500-word statement as to why they want to pursue a M.A. in History at Liberty University.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS
The Master of Arts in History offers two tracks, thesis or non-thesis. Students pursuing the thesis track will take eight graduate courses (24 hours) and then write a thesis (6 hours).  Students pursuing the non-thesis track will take twelve courses (36 hours).  Regardless of track, all students will take 12 hours of core courses as part of their total hours.

TRANSFER CREDIT
Students may transfer up to two graduate-level courses (total of 6 credit hours) from an accredited institution subject to department approval.  In order to transfer credit, students must have earned the minimum grade of B-, and courses must have been completed within 10 years of the start date of the program. No core courses can be transferred from another institution. Credits from a prior degree on the same academic level earned through Liberty University are considered transfer credits.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

  1. Satisfactory completion of all course and/or thesis requirements in either the thesis (30 hours) or non-thesis (36 hours) tracks.  Students must complete all courses with a 3.00 or higher cumulative grade point average.
  2. Thesis Option program: A minimum of 24 hours must be completed through Liberty University, not to include credits from a prior degree earned through Liberty.
  3. Non-Thesis Option program: A minimum of 30 hours must be completed through Liberty University, not to include credits from a prior degree earned through Liberty.
  4. For each option, a maximum of six (6) hours of transfer credit, including credit from a degree one the same academic level previously earned through Liberty, may be applied to the degree subject to department approval.
  5. Students must receive at least a B in each of the program’s core courses (includes grades of B+ & B-).
  6. No more than two grades of C may be applied to the degree (includes grades of C+ & C-).
  7. No grade of D may be applied to the degree (includes grades of D+ & D-).
  8. Students pursuing an M.A. in History (thesis-track) with a European emphasis must have completed the equivalent of 12 hours at the undergraduate level in one language other than English or demonstrate a reading competency in a non-English language.
  9. Degree must be completed within five years.
  10. All Resident students are required to enroll in and pass GRST 500 in their first semester.
  11. Submit a Graduation Application to the Registrar’s Office at the beginning of the final semester.

Program of Study

(M.A.) Master of Arts in History (30 hrs) Thesis Option
Program Option: Resident Format
Core Courses (12 hrs)
HIST 501 Historical Methods and Interpretation 3
HIST 520 Teaching History 3
HIST 550 Reading Seminar in American History 3
HIST 551 Reading Seminar in Modern European History 3
History Elective Courses (9 hrs)*
Choose three 500-600 level electives from the following disciplines for which prerequisites have been met: 9
HIST/HIEU/HIUS/HIWD (500-600 level) _________ 3
HIST/HIEU/HIUS/HIWD (500-600 level) _________ 3
HIST/HIEU/HIUS/HIWD (500-600 level) _________ 3
Graduate Elective Course (3 hrs)*
Choose one 500-600 level graduate course, including History electives not already taken 3
_________ _________ (500-600 level) 3
Thesis (6 hrs)
HIST 689 Thesis Proposal and Research 3*
HIST 690 Thesis Defense 3
* Any student who is not ready for enrollment in HIST 690 after completing HIST 689 may be required, as determined by the student's thesis chair, to repeat HIST 689 until deemed ready for enrollment in HIST 690
(M.A.) Master of Arts in History (36 hrs) Non-Thesis Option
Program Option: Resident Format
Core courses (12 hrs)
HIST 501 Historical Methods and Interpretation 3
HIST 520 Teaching History 3
HIST 550 Reading Seminar in American History 3
HIST 551 Reading Seminar in Modern European History 3
History Elective Courses (18 hrs)*
Choose six 500-600 level electives from the following disciplines for which prerequisites have been met: 18
HIST/HIEU/HIUS/HIWD (500-600 level) _________ 3
HIST/HIEU/HIUS/HIWD (500-600 level) _________ 3
HIST/HIEU/HIUS/HIWD (500-600 level) _________ 3
HIST/HIEU/HIUS/HIWD (500-600 level) _________ 3
HIST/HIEU/HIUS/HIWD (500-600 level) _________ 3
HIST/HIEU/HIUS/HIWD (500-600 level) _________ 3
Graduate Elective Courses (6 hrs)*
Choose two 500-600 level graduate courses including History electives not already taken 6
_________ _________ (500-600 level) 3
_________ _________ (500-600 level) 3

Department of Philosophy

Gary R., Habermas, B.R.E., M.A., Ph.D.
Chair, Department of Philosophy
Distinguished Research Professor of Apologetics and Philosophy

Edward N. Martin, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
Co-Chair, Department of Philosophy
Director, Master of Arts in Philosophical Studies
Professor of Philosophy and Theology


Faculty

RESIDENTIAL – FULL-TIME
Distinguished Research Professor
Habermas

Professor
Baggett; Beck; Foreman; Hinkson; Martin, E.; Provenzola

Associate Professor
Jones, M.


Master of Arts in Philosophical Studies (M.A.P.S.)

PURPOSE
C. S. Lewis held that good philosophy must be maintained and furthered carefully, for at least one very important reason: to answer bad philosophy.  If ideas have consequences, and really bad ideas have really bad consequences--which is certainly born out in all periods of time, including our own--, then we seem justified in holding that good ideas can have really good consequences.  Providing a Christ-centered program in Philosophy and Christian Philosophy will further the mission of our University, in teaching the skills, knowledge, and values (all three critically important classical philosophical terms) to students to positively impact today's world.  The impact on our world will be seen in the graduate's skills to apply the proper philosophy of technology, work and life; the graduate's knowledge of the nature of key philosophical concepts in metaphysics, epistemology, aesthetics and ethics, right and wrong, beautiful and ugly, sacred and profane, being spiritually grounded individuals who relate well with others, eager to understand and work against injustices in the world of people and against the world itself; and, finally, the graduate's values of the dignity and respect due to persons by dint of our being forged in the image of the true Lord of our souls and our very lives.  Soli Deo gloria!

The Master of Arts in Philosophical Studies is a residential-only program designed for persons desiring a graduate-level education in Philosophy, Christian Thought/Apologetics, and studies in the Christian worldview, It provides an excellent basis for graduate work at the doctoral level, and offers advanced study for personal enrichment in one or more of these areas of research. For the pastor serving in a local church, these programs are suitable for advanced continuing education. However, they are not designed for pastoral training.

PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES
The student will be able to:

  1. Evaluate major Christian options in classical and contemporary philosophy.
  2. Produce research using appropriate scholarly methods and resources.
  3. Appraise the value of classical and contemporary philosophical arguments for Christian theories of reality, knowledge, and value.

PROGRAM SPECIFIC ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
In addition to the general admission procedures, the following regulations will govern admission into the Master of Arts in Philosophical Studies program:

  1. Minimum cumulative undergraduate GPA of 3.00 on a scale of 4.00.
  2. The applicant must have a minimum score of 300 (a combination of the Verbal and Quantitative scores) on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) and 3.5 on the analytic writing portion, or have successfully completed 12 credit hours of graduate-level coursework.
  3. The applicant must have an undergraduate major or minor in philosophy, religious studies, the humanities, or a related field.
  4. A 300-450 word Statement of Purpose (in which the applicant expresses reasons for pursuing the degree).

An applicant who fails to meet the requirements listed above may be admitted on Cautionary status.  Students admitted on Academic caution must take and pass GRST 500 – Introduction to Graduate Writing their first semester. The deficiencies in prior training may then be satisfied with undergraduate courses. After satisfying admissions requirements and after having completed no more than nine hours toward graduation, the student may then apply for degree candidacy.

TRANSFER CREDIT
Students may transfer up to two graduate-level courses (total of 6 credit hours) from an accredited institution subject to department approval.  In order to transfer credit, students must have earned the minimum grade of B-, and courses must have been completed within 10 years of the start date of the program. Credits from a prior degree on the same academic level earned through Liberty University are considered transfer credits.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS
When possible, students should strive to take PHIL 680 during the first Spring semester of their program.  Seminars (PHIL 597, 697) are offered frequently, and on a rotating basis with various topics, and can be taken multiple times for this reason.  The program director can advise you of upcoming courses to be offered and help you determine times and dates of various phases of one’s program.  It should be noted that the MAPS program includes a thesis that normally takes two semesters or more to complete.

FOREIGN LANGUAGE REQUIREMENT
Master of Arts in Philosophical Studies students may meet the foreign language requirement in one of the following three manners:

  1. Successfully complete 12 undergraduate hours or nine graduate hours of one foreign language with an overall average of B;
  2. Successfully perform in a translation examination, with test and score determined by the appropriate department; and
  3. Successfully complete a Foreign Language Reading Competency Test developed by the Educational Testing Services of Princeton, NJ.

GRADUATE STUDIES HANDBOOK
Each Master of Arts in Philosophical Studies (MAPS) student is required to obtain a copy of the Graduate Studies Handbook. This publication gives policies and procedures that are unique to the M.A. program, outlines steps to be followed in securing the mentor for the thesis, as well as deadlines for this process, and provides other information that will assist the MAPS student.

COMPREHENSIVE EXAM
The Master of Arts in Philosophical Studies program requires a comprehensive exam over the area of concentration.
Four testing times have been established for comprehensive exams. They are:

  1. January (one week prior to first day of second semester)
  2. Week following spring vacation
  3. August (one week prior to first day of first semester)
  4. Week following fall break of Thanksgiving break

The comprehensive exam must be taken no less than one month prior to the month of anticipated graduation.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
In addition to general regulations governing graduation, Master of Arts in Philosophical Studies graduates must meet the following requirements:

  1. Must complete 36 semester hours and have a cumulative grade point average of 3.00 in M.A. work.
  2. A minimum of 30 semester hours must be completed through Liberty University, not to include credits from a prior degree earned through Liberty.
  3. A maximum of six (6) hours of transfer credit, including credit from a degree on the same academic level previously earned through Liberty, may be applied to the degree.
  4. No more than two (2) grades of C may be applied to the degree (includes grades of C+ & C-).
  5. No grade of D may be applied to the degree (includes grades of D+ & D-).
  6. Proficiency in one foreign language for research.
  7. Must pass a major comprehensive exam over the area of concentration.
  8. Must successfully complete a thesis in the area of concentration which demonstrates research ability with a minimum grade of B (includes grades of B+ & B-).
  9. Degree must be completed within five years.
  10. All Resident students are required to enroll in and pass GRST 500 in their first semester.
  11. Submit a Graduation Application to the Registrar’s Office at the beginning of the final semester.

PROGRAM OF STUDY
A program of study in the Master of Arts in Philosophical Studies may be constructed by the student in consultation with the appropriate Program Director and the approval of the Academic Dean. The program of study must be developed before the student matriculates, but modifications may be made afterward with the approval of the Program Director. The program of study may be focused entirely on one cognate area or may be a program that integrates different areas.  There are two cognate areas: Philosophy or Christian Thought.  Christian Thought in this context is usually taken to mean Christian Apologetics, but for those needing a core of courses in other related fields (such as biblical studies, church history, and/or theology), contact the Program Director.


Program of Study

(M.A.P.S.) Master of Arts in Philosophical Studies (36 hrs) Thesis Track
Program Option: Resident Format
Foundational Courses (15 hrs)
APOL 500 Introduction to Apologetics 3
APOL 610 Miracles 3
PHIL 550 Introduction to Philosophy of Religion 3
PHIL 565 Modern Philosophy 3
PHIL 575 Contemporary Philosophy 3
Philosophy Requirement Courses (6 hrs)
Choose one of the following courses:
PHIL 605 The Existence of God 3
PHIL 615 The Problem of Evil 3
Choose one of the following courses:
PHIL 620 Philosophy of Language 3
PHIL 625 Classic and Religious Epistemology 3
Core Courses (9 hrs) **
Thesis Courses (6 hrs)
PHIL 680 Research Methods 1 3*
PHIL 690 Thesis Defense 3
** NOTE: The program of study may be focused entirely on one area or may be a unified program utilizing course work in several related fields. The two cognate areas of concentration are Philosophy and Christian Thought.
* Any student who is not ready for enrollment in PHIL 690 after completing PHIL 680 may be required, as determined by the student's thesis chair, to take PHIL 689 Thesis Project Proposal and Research, and may be required to repeat PHIL 689 until deemed ready for enrollment in PHIL 690.

*Any student who is not ready for enrollment in PHIL 690 after completing PHIL 680 may be required, as determined by the student’s thesis chair, to take PHIL 689 Thesis Project Proposal and Research, and may be required to repeat PHIL 689 until deemed ready for enrollment in PHIL 690.



Highlighted text indicates a change from the official version of the catalog.