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Undergraduate Catalog 2012-2013

College of Arts and Sciences

Roger Schultz, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
Dean, College of Arts and Sciences
Professor of History

Sean Beavers, B.M., M.M., D.M.
Associate Dean, College of Arts and Sciences
Instrumental Coordinator, Department of Music
Associate Professor of Music


PURPOSE
The College of Arts and Sciences provides learning opportunities in the academic disciplines relating to man’s cultural, social and scientific achievements. The College offers instruction in English, family and consumer sciences, French, geography, history, humanities, linguistics, mathematics, military science, philosophy, physical science, physics, Spanish, and Teaching English as a Second/Foreign Language.

TEACHER LICENSURE
Liberty University offers teacher licensure programs which are approved by the State of Virginia Department of Education. Among the options available to students through the College of Arts and Sciences are courses of study leading to licensure in English, family and consumer sciences, history/social science, mathematics, music (choral or instrumental), Spanish, and Teaching English as a Second/Foreign Language.

Those who enter the teacher licensure program must complete the academic major, be subject to the same general education requirements as all other students, and complete academic and practicum experiences related to professional teacher training.

Those wishing to pursue teacher-related programs should seek information from the Teacher Licensure Office in the School of Education. Licensure information is also available at www.liberty.edu/uguide.

DEGREE COMPLETION PLANS (DCP)      
Degree Completion Plans for degree programs offered by the College of Arts and Sciences can be found online at: http://www.liberty.edu/dcps.


Air Force – ROTC

ADJUNCT FACULTY
Colonel Jon Wolfe, B.S., M.S., M.A.
Commander Air Force – ROTC Detachment 890

PURPOSE
The Air Force Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (AFROTC) offered to Liberty University students through the University of Virginia affords students the opportunity to receive United States Air Force officer training while completing undergraduate or graduate studies. AFROTC is the largest of three programs available through the Air Force to earn a commission and serve as an officer in the United States Air Force.

AFROTC offers commissioning opportunities for students of all levels, both graduate and undergraduate. The 4-year program is designed for students who join during their first year of college. Students take all 4 years of Air Science Classes and attend a 4-week summer field training encampment at an Air Force Base between their second and third years.

Students may also enroll in AFROTC during their second year of college. Those awarded a scholarship will dual enroll in both the AIRS 100 and AIRS 200 courses during their second year of college and attend a 4 week summer field training encampment. Students not on scholarship will only take the AIRS 200 level courses and attend a 5-week summer field training encampment.

Unless the student earns an AFROTC scholarship, there is no service obligation inside the first 2 years of the 4 year program. However, all students who enter into the Professional Officer Course (the last 2 years), enter into a contractual obligation with the Air Force to serve on active duty upon commissioning.

After graduation and commissioning as second lieutenants in the Air Force, graduates serve in any number of career fields for a 4-year active duty service commitment. Interested and qualified students may compete to become Air Force pilots or navigators. Successful pilot and navigator candidates serve 10 and 6 year active duty service commitments, respectively. Active duty may be delayed after graduation for those who wish to immediately pursue a graduate degree.

SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM
Merit-based financial scholarships are offered to qualified students through two, three, and four-year scholarships. Qualified students may be offered an AFROTC scholarship for full or partial college tuition, incidental fees, textbook allowances, and a monthly subsistence allowance of at least $300. Scholarship students incur a military obligation.

CONTACT INFORMATION
AFROTC Detachment 890; University of Virginia; P.O. Box 400188; Charlottesville, Virginia 22904-4188. Phone number: 434-924-6832. Fax number: 434-982-2842. Email: afrotc@virginia.edu or website: www.virginia.edu/~afrotc.


Program of Study

Air Force R.O.T.C. (16 hrs)
AIRS A Leadership Laboratory 0*
AIRS 110 The Foundations of the United States Air Force I 1
AIRS 120 The Foundations of the United States Air Force II 1
AIRS 210 The Evolution of Air and Space Power I 1
AIRS 220 The Evolution of Air and Space Power II 1
AIRS 310 Concepts of Air Force Leadership and Management I 3
AIRS 320 Concepts of Air Force Leadership and Management II 3
AIRS 410 National Security Affairs I 3
AIRS 420 National Security Affairs II 3
* Required with every AIRS course
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Army – ROTC

RESIDENTIAL FACULTY
Major Robert J. Foy, USA, B.A., M.A.
Instructor of Military Science

PURPOSE
The Army Reserve Officers Training Corps (ROTC) offers a general military science curriculum that prepares eligible men and women to compete for a commission as an officer in the United States Army.

SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM
Merit based financial incentives are offered to qualified students through two, three, and four-year scholarships (full tuition fees), a book allowance of $1,200 annually, and a monthly stipend of up to $500 per month. Scholarship students incur a military obligation.

INTERNSHIP
Internships are available during the summer of the sophomore year for qualified students that did not participate in ROTC during their freshmen and sophomore years.  Participants are provided transportation, food, lodging, uniforms, and are paid during the 28-day camp. Students that successfully complete the internship are eligible to compete for a two-year scholarship.

CONTACT INFORMATION
Army ROTC; Liberty University; 1971 University Blvd.; LaHaye Student Union, Room 2900; Lynchburg, VA 24502.  Toll-free phone number: 1-888-LU-AROTC. Email: jaezzo@liberty.edu.


Program of Study

Army R.O.T.C. (20 hrs)
MISC 001 Leadership Applications  1 8
MISC 101 Fundamental Concepts 1
MISC 102 Basic Leadership 1
MISC 201 Advanced Leadership 1
MISC 202 Tactics and Officership 1
MISC 301 Small Unit Leadership 2
MISC 302 Small Unit Operations 2
MISC 401 Leadership, Management, and Ethics 2
MISC 402 Transition to Lieutenant 2

Each semester


Military Leadership Minor

PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES
The student will be able to:

  1. Develop and implement principles in agreement with US Army leadership doctrine.
  2. Employ Army technical and tactical skills in small unit operations to formulate solutions to complex problems.
Military Leadership Minor (23 hrs)
MISC 001 Leadership Applications  1 8
MISC 101 Fundamental Concepts 1
MISC 102 Basic Leadership 1
MISC 201 Advanced Leadership 1
MISC 202 Tactics and Officership 1
MISC 301 Small Unit Leadership 2
MISC 302 Small Unit Operations 2
MISC 401 Leadership, Management, and Ethics 2
MISC 402 Transition to Lieutenant 2
HIUS 380 Modern American Military History 3

Each semester

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Center for Creation Studies

David A. DeWitt, B.S., Ph.D., Director
Professor of Biology

The Center for Creation Studies is an interdisciplinary education and research institute committed to the study of the origin of the universe, the earth, life, and species. This study draws upon knowledge from religion, science, philosophy, and history.

The primary educational activity of the Center is the presentation of CRST 290, History of Life. This course is required of all Liberty students and is designed to provide a thorough understanding of the creation-evolution controversy.

Exhibits, currently located in the Science Hall and back hallway of DeMoss Hall, teach concepts of the creation model, describe creationist research, and glorify the Creator of earth and life.

PURPOSE
The purpose of the Center for Creation Studies is to promote the development of a consistent biblical view of origins in our students. The Center seeks to equip students to defend their faith in the creation account in Genesis using science, reason, and the Scriptures. The minor in Creation Studies provides a flexible program with a broad training in scientific disciplines that relate to origins as well as the Bible.  Students in science or non-science majors can benefit from the in depth study of creation and evolution.


Creation Studies Minor

PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES
The student will be able to:

  1. Analyze the data relating to the issues of creation and evolution.
  2. Provide scientific and biblical arguments that support a literal interpretation of the biblical account of world history.
Creation Studies Minor (20 hrs)
CRST 290 History of Life 2
CRST 390 Origins 3
BIBL 410 Genesis 3
Select three courses (12 hrs) from the following:
PHSC 210 Elements of Earth Science 4
AND
PHSC 211 Elements of Earth Science Lab
PHSC 310 Astronomy: An Integrated Approach 4
BIOL 415 Cell Biology 4
BIOL 102 Principles of Human Biology 4*
AND
BIOL 104 Principles of Human Biology Laboratory
OR
BIOL 225 General Biology II 4*
OR
BIOL 213 Human Anatomy and Physiology I 4*
AND
BIOL 214 Human Anatomy and Physiology I Lab
OR
BIOL 215 Human Anatomy and Physiology II 4*
AND
BIOL 216 Human Anatomy and Physiology II Lab
BIOL 321 Comparative Anatomy of the Vertebrates 4*
* Only one of these courses will count toward the minor. If BIOL 213/214 or 215/216 is selected, students must take both courses but only 4 credits count toward the minor.

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Department of English and Modern Languages

Karen S. Prior, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
Chair, Department of English and Modern Languages
Professor of English

RESIDENTIAL FACULTY
Professor
Ayres, Curtis, Gribbin, McClelland, Prior, Schmidt, Towles, D., Woodard

Associate Professor
Adu-Gyamfi, DeLong, J., Foley, C., Hähnlen, Harris, Kim, J., Müller, Nutter, J., Reed

Assistant Professor
Bell, S., Blankenship, Simpson, S., Thorn

Instructor
Peterson

Lecturer
Coates, Hammersmith, Tweedy


PURPOSE
The Department of English and Modern Languages provides instruction in the theory and practice of writing, in linguistics, modern languages, and the acquisition of languages, and in the analysis and criticism of literature, in order to prepare students for careers and for graduate study in language arts and language arts education, and for a life of growing appreciation for language and the language arts.


English Major (B.A.)

PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES
The student will be able to:

  1. Interpret and evaluate literary and critical texts in the context of a Christian worldview;
  2. Formulate and express original ideas based on critical analysis of texts;
  3. Analyze relationships between texts and literary and cultural history;
  4. Write according to the complex demands of grammar and mechanics, purpose, audience, and discursive style;
  5. Research and write in the style appropriate to the field of English; and
  6. Argue, dialogue, and collaborate with others in a manner appropriate to the field of English.

Spanish Major (B.A.)

PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES
The student will be able to:

  1. Communicate effectively and converse fluently with native speakers.
  2. Identify and correct grammatical errors in written texts.
  3. Read aloud with a good accent, and answer content questions on a variety of literary, historical, and cultural texts.
  4. Identify and describe various components of Hispanic culture and civilization.

Teaching English as a Second/Foreign Language Major (B.A.)

PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES
The student will be able to:

  1. Identify and explain the primary linguistic features of the English language.
  2. Apply syntactic and phonological theories to the analysis of European languages such as French, Spanish, and German.
  3. Demonstrate general knowledge of the syntax and phonology of the major languages of the world.
  4. Demonstrate a theoretical and practical understanding of such issues as second language acquisition, teaching methods and materials in TES/FL, error analysis, and placement testing.
  5. Identify, explain, and provide solutions to various cross-cultural and cross-linguistic problems involved in oral and written communication.

SIGMA TAU DELTA ENGLISH HONOR SOCIETY
Purpose

  1. To confer distinction for high achievement in the English language and in literature.
  2. To provide cultural stimulation and promote interest in literature and the English language in the community.
  3. To foster the discipline of English in all its aspects, including creative and critical writing.
  4. To promote good citizenship among its members.
  5. To exhibit high standards of academic excellence.
  6. To uphold the spiritual standards of the University.

Requirements

  • Twelve hours of English;
  • At least a B in every English course;
  • GPA of 3.25.

SIGMA DELTA PI SPANISH HONOR SOCIETY
Purpose

  1. To recognize those who attain excellence in the study of the Spanish language and in the study of the literature and culture of the Spanish-speaking peoples.
  2. To honor those who have contributed to the furthering excellence in the study of the Spanish language and culture through honorary membership.
  3. To foster interest in Spanish language and culture among students of Liberty University and in the Lynchburg community.
  4. To encourage the involvement of both native and non-native Spanish speakers in community service and leadership.
  5. To promote student scholarship and encourage continued language study after graduation.

Requirements

  • 3.00 overall GPA
  • 3.25 GPA in Spanish coursework
  • At least one class in upper division Spanish coursework (300+)

Career Opportunities

Business Professions
Civil Services Second-language instruction
Graduate school Teaching
Ministry Translation
Law Writing

Programs of Study

English Major (B.A.)
General Education: Core Competency Requirements (53-57 hrs)
Liberal Arts Focus:
Language Requirements (12 hrs) Must be one language; 6 hours must be at the 200 level or above.
Integrative Studies (6 hrs)
Courses in the Major (39 hrs)
ENGL 200 Level Literature 1 6
Writing
Choose One: 3
ENGL 350 Advanced Expository Writing
ENGL 351 Creative Writing: Poetry
ENGL 352 Creative Writing: Fiction
ENGL 401 Seminar in Writing
Author
Choose One: 3
ENGL 403 Milton
ENGL 452 Chaucer
Period
Choose One: 3
ENGL 303 English Romanticism
ENGL 321 Victorian Period
ENGL 339 Early American Literature
ENGL 340 The American Renaissance
ENGL 341 American Realism and Naturalism
ENGL 344 American Modernism
ENGL 347 Southern Renascence
ENGL 382 Eighteenth Century English Literature
ENGL 443 Elizabethan Literature
ENGL 463 Seventeenth Century English Literature
Genre
Choose One: 3
ENGL 311 The English Novel
ENGL 342 The American Novel
ENGL 402 Modern Novel
ENGL 410 Classical Epic
ENGL 422 Modern Drama
ENGL 432 Modern Poetry
ENGL 442 Musical Theatre
Diversity
Choose One: 3
ENGL 437 African-American Literature
ENGL 438 Women’s Literature
ENGL 456 Advanced Studies in World Literature
ENGL 322 Shakespeare 3
ENGL 333 Modern Grammar 3
ENGL 364 History of the English Language 3
ENGL 433 Literary Criticism 3
ENGL Upper Level Electives 6
Directed Courses (Required) (0-6 hrs)*
ENGL 221 World Literature I 3
HIEU 201 History of Western Civilization I 3
* These courses are approved General Education courses and may be counted in the Core Competency Requirements
Free Electives (6-10 hrs)
TOTAL HOURS: 120 hours minimum; at least 39 hours must be 300-400 level.

Must be chosen from two different areas (American, English, or World Literature.

English Major (B.A.) Teacher Licensure Requirements Endorsement: English (6-12)
General Education: Core Competency Requirements (53-57 hrs)
Liberal Arts Focus:
Language Requirements (12 hrs) Must be one language; 6 hours must be at the 200 level or above
Integrative Studies (6 hrs)
Courses in the Major (39 hrs)
ENGL Literature: 200 level 1 6
Author
ENGL 403 Milton 3
OR
ENGL 452 Chaucer
Period
ENGL 303 English Romanticism 3
OR
ENGL 321 Victorian Period
OR
ENGL 339 Early American Literature
OR
ENGL 340 The American Renaissance
OR
ENGL 341 American Realism and Naturalism
OR
ENGL 344 American Modernism
OR
ENGL 347 Southern Renascence
OR
ENGL 382 Eighteenth Century English Literature
OR
ENGL 443 Elizabethan Literature
OR
ENGL 463 Seventeenth Century English Literature
Diversity
ENGL 437 African-American Literature 3
OR
ENGL 438 Women’s Literature
OR
ENGL 456 Advanced Studies in World Literature
ENGL 322 Shakespeare 3
ENGL 333 Modern Grammar 3
ENGL 350 Advanced Expository Writing 3
ENGL 364 History of the English Language 3
ENGL 422 Modern Drama 3
OR
ENGL 442 Musical Theatre
ENGL 433 Literary Criticism 3
ENGL Upper Level Electives 6
Directed Courses (required) (3-9 hrs)
ENGL 221 World Literature I 3*
HIEU 201 History of Western Civilization I 3*
PSYC 210 Developmental Psychology 3
Teacher Licensure Requirements (31 hrs)
EDUC 125 Introduction to Education 1
EDUC 221 Content Area Reading and Differentiated Teaching and Learning (Secondary) 2
EDUC 235 Instructional Design: Secondary 1
EDUC 236 Instructional Design Practicum: Secondary 2
EDUC 240 Introduction to Applied Educational Technology Practicum 2
EDUC 360 Foundations of Education 2
EDUC 425 Secondary Measurement and Evaluation 3
EDUC 435 Secondary Curriculum Fundamentals 2
EDUC 436 Secondary Curriculum Fundamentals Practicum 1
EDUC 419 Secondary Teaching Methods 2
EDUC 420 Secondary Teaching Methods Practicum 1
Professional Semester
EDUC 475 Seminar in Classroom Management 2
EDUC 476 Student Teaching I 5
EDUC 477 Student Teaching II 5
* These courses are approved General Education courses and may be counted in the Core Competency Requirements
TOTAL HOURS: 144 hours minimum; at least 62 hours must be 300-400 level.

Must be chosen from two different areas (American, English, or World Literature.

Spanish Major (B.A.)
General Education: Core Competency Requirements (53-57 hrs)
Liberal Arts Focus: Integrative Studies (6 hrs)
Courses in the Major (36 hrs)
SPAN 301 Advanced Spanish Grammar and Composition 3
SPAN 302 Advanced Spanish Composition and Conversation 3
SPAN 304 Civilization and Culture of Latin America 3
OR
SPAN 305 Civilization and Culture of Spain
SPAN 310 Introduction to Translation: Spanish-English 3
SPAN 321 Modern Spanish Literature 3
SPAN 450 Senior Seminar: Comparison Between Spanish and Latin American Literature 3
SPAN 1 6
LING 213 Introduction to Linguistics 3
Choose three courses (9 hrs) from the following:
SPAN 320 Cinema and Dramatic Literature
SPAN 322 Peninsular Literature
SPAN 323 Latin American Literature
SPAN 410 Advanced Translation
SPAN 421 Masterpieces of Spanish Literature
Directed Courses (Required) (0-6 hrs)
ENGL 221 World Literature I 3*
OR
ENGL 222 World Literature II
HIEU 201 History of Western Civilization I 3*
Free Electives (21-25 hrs)
TOTAL HOURS: 120 hours minimum; at least 33 hours must be 300-400 level.
* These courses are approved General Education courses and may be counted in the Core Competency Requirements

Six (6) hours of internship or the equivalent to be taken abroad in a country where Spanish is the language of business and government.

Spanish Major (B.A.) Teacher Licensure Requirements Endorsement: Spanish (PreK-12)
General Education: Core Competency Requirements (53-57 hrs)
Liberal Arts Focus: Integrative Studies (6 hrs)
Courses in the Major (36 hrs)
SPAN 301 Advanced Spanish Grammar and Composition 3
SPAN 302 Advanced Spanish Composition and Conversation 3
SPAN 304 Civilization and Culture of Latin America 3
OR
SPAN 305 Civilization and Culture of Spain
SPAN 310 Introduction to Translation: Spanish-English 3
SPAN 321 Modern Spanish Literature 3
SPAN 450 Senior Seminar: Comparison Between Spanish and Latin American Literature 3
SPAN 1 6
LING 213 Introduction to Linguistics 3
TESL/SPAN 403: Second Language Acquisition 3
Choose two courses (6 hrs) from the following:
SPAN 320 Cinema and Dramatic Literature
SPAN 322 Peninsular Literature
SPAN 323 Latin American Literature
SPAN 410 Advanced Translation
SPAN 421 Masterpieces of Spanish Literature
Directed Courses (required) (3-9 hrs)
ENGL 221 World Literature I 3*
OR
ENGL 222 World Literature II
HIEU 201 History of Western Civilization I 3*
PSYC 210 Developmental Psychology 3
Teacher Licensure Requirements (31 hrs)
EDUC 125 Introduction to Education 1
EDUC 221 Content Area Reading and Differentiated Teaching and Learning (Secondary) 2
EDUC 235 Instructional Design: Secondary 1
EDUC 236 Instructional Design Practicum: Secondary 2
EDUC 240 Introduction to Applied Educational Technology Practicum 2
EDUC 360 Foundations of Education 2
EDUC 425 Secondary Measurement and Evaluation 3
EDUC 435 Secondary Curriculum Fundamentals 2
EDUC 436 Secondary Curriculum Fundamentals Practicum 1
TESL 419 Methodology and Curriculum in Teaching Modern Languages 2
TESL 420 Methods Teaching Practicum 1
Professional Semester
EDUC 475 Seminar in Classroom Management 2
EDUC 476 Student Teaching I 5
EDUC 477 Student Teaching II 5
NOTE: Spanish majors must achieve a minimum of Advanced Low on the Oral Proficiency Interview (OPI) in order to obtain licensure.
TOTAL HOURS: 129 hours minimum; at least 56 hours must be 300-400 level.
* These courses are approved General Education courses and may be counted in the Core Competency Requirements

Six (6) hours of internship or the equivalent to be taken abroad in a country where Spanish is the language of business and government.

Teaching English as a Second or Foreign Language Major (TES/FL) (B.A.)
General Education: Core Competency Requirements (53-57 hrs)
Liberal Arts Focus:
Language Requirement (12 hrs) Must be one language 1
Integrative Studies (6 hrs)
Courses in the Major (39 hrs)
ENGL 350 Advanced Expository Writing 3
ENGL 364 History of the English Language 3
ENGL 456 Advanced Studies in World Literature 3
LING 213 Introduction to Linguistics 3
LING 305 Linguistic Analysis 3
LING 453 World Languages 3
TESL 333 Modern Grammar 3
TESL 403 Second Language Acquisition  2 3
TESL 405 Issues and Practices in TES/FL 3
TESL 419 Methodology and Curriculum in Teaching Modern Languages  3 2
TESL 420 Methods Teaching Practicum 1
TESL 499 TES/FL Intership 4 3
SOCI 340 Human Societies: A Global View 3
FREN 304 Francophone Civilizations/Cultures 3
OR
SPAN 304 Civilization and Culture of Latin America
Directed Courses (Required) (3-12 hrs)
ENGL 221 World Literature I 3*
OR
ENGL 222 World Literature II *
HIEU 201 History of Western Civilization I 5 3*
HIEU 202 History of Western Civilization II 6 3*
PSYC 210 Developmental Psychology 3*
Free Electives (3-7 hrs)
TOTAL HOURS: 120 hours minimum; at least 42 hours must be 300-400 level.
*These courses are approved General Education courses and may be counted in the Core Competency Requirements

6 hours must be at the 200 level or above

Crosslisted with SPAN 403

Crosslisted with SPAN 420

Teacher Licensure students who complete Student Teaching do not need to take TESL 499

These courses are approved General Education courses and may be counted in the Core Competency Requirements

These courses are approved General Education courses and may be counted in the Core Competency Requirements

Teacher Licensure Requirements – Endorsement: Teaching English as a Second/Foreign Language (B.A.)
General Education: Core Competency Requirements (53-57 hrs)
Liberal Arts Focus:
Language (12 hrs) Must be one language 1
Integrative Studies (6 hrs)
Courses in the Major (33 hrs)
Directed Courses (required) (3-12 hrs)
Teacher Licensure Requirements (31 hrs)
EDUC 125 Introduction to Education 1
EDUC 221 Content Area Reading and Differentiated Teaching and Learning (Secondary) 2
EDUC 235 Instructional Design: Secondary 1
EDUC 236 Instructional Design Practicum: Secondary 2
EDUC 240 Introduction to Applied Educational Technology Practicum 2
EDUC 360 Foundations of Education 2
EDUC 425 Secondary Measurement and Evaluation 3
EDUC 435 Secondary Curriculum Fundamentals 2
EDUC 436 Secondary Curriculum Fundamentals Practicum 1
TESL 419 Methodology and Curriculum in Teaching Modern Languages 2
TESL 420 Methods Teaching Practicum 1
Professional Semester
EDUC 475 Seminar in Classroom Management 2
EDUC 476 Student Teaching I 5
EDUC 477 Student Teaching II 5
TOTAL HOURS: 138 hours minimum; at least 59 hours must be 300-400 level.

General Education: Core Competency Requirements (53-57 hrs)


English Minor

English Minor (15 hrs)
Choose one from each category:
ENGL - 350, 351, 352, 401, or 433 3
ENGL - 333 or 364 3
ENGL - 303, 321, 339, 340, 382, 443, or 463 3
ENGL - 322, 403, or 452 3
ENGL - 311, 342, 402, 405, 422, or 432 3

French Minor

PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES
The student will be able to:

  1. Communicate orally in French, demonstrating listening comprehension skills, speaking proficiency, correct grammar, and appropriate vocabulary.
  2. Demonstrate written communication skills, including the ability to produce clear, logical, and grammatically and syntactically appropriate French-language compositions.
French Minor* (15 hrs)
FREN 102 Elementary French II 3*
FREN 201 Intermediate French I 3
FREN 202 Intermediate French II 3
FREN - Electives (300-400 level) 6
* Those students with prior language study are encouraged to consider CLEP for lower level language credits.

Linguistics Minor

PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES
The student will be able to:

  1. Analyze language data based on linguistic concepts.
  2. Explain the functions of fundamental linguistic constructs in relation to how language works.
     
Linguistics Minor (18 hrs)
Foundations:
LING 213 Introduction to Linguistics 3
LING 305 Linguistic Analysis 3
LING 451 Phonetics and Phonology 3
LING 452 Morphology and Syntax 3
Application: Choose two courses (6 hrs):
LING 280 Field Language Learning
LING 300 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
LING 453 World Languages

Spanish Minor

Spanish Minor* (15 hrs)
SPAN 102 Elementary Spanish II 3*
SPAN 201 Intermediate Spanish I 3
SPAN 202 Intermediate Spanish II 3
SPAN - Electives (upper level 300-400) 6
* Those students with prior language study are encouraged to consider CLEP for lower level language credits.

Writing Minor

PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES
The student will be able to:

  1. Write according to the complex demands of genre, purpose, audience, and discursive style.
  2. Research and write in the style appropriate to English.
Writing Minor (15 hrs)
Required Courses (6 hrs)
ENGL 350 Advanced Expository Writing 3
ENGL 351 Creative Writing: Poetry 3
OR
ENGL 352 Creative Writing: Fiction 3
Choose three courses from the following (9 hrs)
COMS 220 Mass Communication Writing 3
Prerequisite: ENGL 101
COMS 234 Copy Editing 3
Prerequisite: COMS 220
COMS 323 Scriptwriting for Visual Media 3
Prerequisites: COMS 110, 220
COMS 354 News Writing 3
Prerequisites: COMS 220, 234
COMS 373 Editorial and Opinion Writing 3
Prerequisites: COMS 220, 234
COMS 374 Magazine Writing and Editing 3
Prerequisites: COMS 220, 234
COMS 485 Investigative Reporting 3
Prerequisites: COMS 220, 234, 354
ENGL 401 Seminar in Writing 3
ENGR 270 Technical Writing for Engineers 3
GOVT 346 Legal Research and Writing 3
Prerequisites: COMS 220, 234, 354
HONR 495 Senior Honors Thesis 3
SPAN 301 Advanced Spanish Grammar and Composition 3
SPAN 310 Introduction to Translation: Spanish-English 3
SPAN 410 Advanced Translation 3
THEA 350 Writing for the Stage 3
Prerequisite: THEA 211 or 212
THEA 352 Writing for Church Drama 3
Prerequisite: THEA 211 or 212; 312 or 350
* Prerequisites: ENGL 101, 102, and Survey of Literature at the 200 level

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Department of Family and Consumer Sciences

Mary Simpson-Alford, B.S., M.B.A.
Chair, Department of Family and Consumer Sciences
Assistant Professor of Family and Consumer Sciences

RESIDENTIAL FACULTY
Professor
Glaze

Assistant Professor
Benoit, Gomes, Howard, Kitchel, Simpson-Alford


PURPOSE
The purpose of the Family and Consumer Sciences Department is to prepare the student to acquire the values, knowledge, and skills necessary to be proactive to strengthen the function of the contemporary family from a biblical perspective, specifically in the areas of human development /family studies, interior design/housing, food/ nutrition, consumer economics/management, and clothing/ textiles. The Department actively strives to help the student integrate the knowledge base to synergistically focus on the welfare of the family.


Family and Child Development Major (B.S.)

PURPOSE
The Family and Child Development program seeks to prepare students to become early childhood educators and family-related professionals who support the God-given potential of families and children.  A study of human growth and development within the context of family and community provides a framework for an understanding of how people grow, learn and form relationships through the lifespan.

PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES
The student will be able to:

  1. Apply developmental theories within family systems.
  2. Evaluate issues regarding family structures, parenting and child development.
  3. Develop a strategic plan of management and implementation of a child education program.
  4. Communicate as an educator of a child education program.

Family and Consumer Sciences Major (B.S.)

PURPOSE
The Family and Consumer Sciences (FACS) program seeks to strengthen the individual, institution of family and communities through the dissemination of biblical knowledge and the education of professionals.  This program includes family and child development, clothing, interiors, consumer economics, and foods.

PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES
The student will be able to:

  1. Create a pre-design or original design using sewing construction techniques.
  2. Analyze the contents of foods for proper nutrition.
  3. Evaluate issues regarding family structures, parenting and child development.
  4. Plan programs within communities that deal with family and consumer issues.
  5. Communicate as a leader and an educator of family and consumer sciences issues.

Family and Consumer Sciences Teacher Licensure (B.S.)

PURPOSE
The NCATE approved Family and Consumer Sciences Teacher Licensure program seeks to prepare Christ-centered worldview teachers with a broad-spectrum of content knowledge and instructional skills recognized by the Virginia Department of Education Standards of Learning.  This program includes family and child development, clothing, interiors, consumer economics, and foods.

PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES
The student will be able to:

  1. Create a pre-design or original design using sewing construction techniques.
  2. Analyze the contents of foods for proper nutrition.
  3. Evaluate issues regarding family structures, parenting and child development.
  4. Plan programs within communities that deal with family and consumer issues.
  5. Communicate as a leader and an educator of family and consumer sciences issues.

Teacher preparation and endorsement in Family and Consumer Sciences is available through the Department. Those wishing to pursue teacher-related programs should seek information from the Teacher Licensure Office in the School of Education. Licensure information is also available at www.liberty.edu/uguide.


Fashion Merchandising and Interiors Major (B.S.)

Fashion Merchandising Concentration

PURPOSE
The Fashion Merchandising concentration seeks to prepare Christ-centered professionals for the fashion apparel industry in product development, management, merchandising, and distribution.

PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES
The student will be able to:

  1. Communicate as a marketer and merchandiser in the business world.
  2. Evaluate fibers and fabrics for intended use.
  3. Apply business principles and practices to planning and evaluations.
  4. Create a pre-design or original design using sewing construction techniques.
  5. Evaluate interior spaces based on ergonomic design.
  6. Create interior spaces based on the principles and elements of design, function and selection of material, and appropriate to the needs of the consumer.

Interior Design Concentration

PURPOSE
The Interior Design concentration at Liberty University seeks to prepare Christ-centered professionals with skills to design innovative, functional, and environmentally responsible interior environments.  The focus will be on preparation for the National Council for Interior Design Qualification licensing examination. 

PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES
The student will be able to:

  1. Communicate as a marketer and merchandiser in the business world.
  2. Evaluate fibers and fabrics for intended use.
  3. Evaluate interior spaces based on ergonomic design
  4. Create interior spaces based on the principles and elements of design, function and selection of material and appropriate to the needs of the consumer.

INTERNSHIPS
Advisor: Matalie Howard, B.S., M.S.
Internships (FACS 499) are required for all FACS majors.  Students must be of Senior status, FACS major and must have completed 21 hours of major course work.

FACS ASSOCIATION
Advisor: Matalie Howard, B.S., M.S.
The Family and Consumer Sciences (FACS) Association is a pre-professional student organization the purpose of which is to promote student involvement in the profession throughout the University and the community.  The FACS Association offers students opportunities for leadership, friendship, ministry, and career exploration. Officers are elected each spring for the following academic year. The FACS Club sponsors University activities, community projects, club meetings with special speakers, support for all FACS majors and is an exciting springboard for professional involvement.

INTERIOR DESIGN SOCIETY
Advisor: Ruth Gomes, B.S., M.S.
The purpose of the Interior Design Society (IDS) student chapter is to offer interior design students professional opportunities and exposure within the interior design industry.  Liberty University is the first student chapter (2008) in the United States.  The student chapter is a part of the large IDS professional organization which is the largest residential design organization in the country.  The student chapter promotes student involvement in the profession throughout the University and community.  The IDS offers students opportunities for leadership, friendship, professional experience, and exposure to the interior design industry which includes field trips to places such as the Furniture Market in High Point, NC.

OMICRON GAMMA PHI HONOR SOCIETY
Advisor: Debbie Benoit, B.S., M.A., M.A.T.S., D.Min.

Omicron Gamma Phi is an honor society which seeks to recognize excellence among Family and Consumer Science students on Christian campuses.

The purpose of the society is symbolized in its name, OMICRON GAMMA PHI. Omicron represents the first letter in the Greek word for family. Gamma is the first letter in the word for science. Phi is the first letter in the word for light. Omicron Gamma signifies that Family and Consumer Sciences is an applied science. The Phi signifies the Christian aspect of the Honor Society.

The purpose of the society is threefold. First, Omicron Gamma Phi encourages and recognizes excellence in scholastic achievement. Second, it seeks to maintain a Christian worldview through the integration of biblical principles with academic content. Third, the society encourages service by the membership.

Criteria for membership:
A student must have:

  1. 3.00 cumulative GPA;
  2. 45 hours completed; and
  3. A major in the FACS department.

Career Opportunities

Clothing/Textiles
Designer or Assistant Designer Manufacturer Representative
Fashion Coordinator/Buyer            Owner of an Alterations and Sewing Service
Manager of Apparel Store  
Consumer Economics/Management
Consumber Education Consultant Manufacturer's Representative in Industry        
Free-Lance Journalist Research Specialist
Public Relations Specialist                    
Foods/Nutrition
Dining Supervisor Food Service Director
Dining Room Manager Restaurant Manager                         
Director of Quality Control       
Human Development/Family
Commission of Aging Worker/Director Social Service Worker: City, State, Federal
Elder/Child Day Care Administrator Youth Services Administrator: Substance Abuse
Nanny Family and Consumer Sciences Teacher:
Middle School, High School
Interior Design/Housing
Housing Analyst or Consultant Real Estate Property Manager/Sales Associate
Product/Sales Representative           Staging
Residential Interior Designer  

Programs of Study

Family and Child Development Major (B.S.)
General Education: Core Competency Requirements (59-63 hrs)
Courses in the Major (42 hrs)
FACS 103 Introduction to Family and Consumer Sciences 1
FACS 205 Development of Contemporary Families 3
FACS 260 Early Childhood Education 3
FACS 330 Human Nutrition  1
FACS 350 Family Economic Decisions 3
FACS 365 Daycare Administration 3
FACS 370 Parenting 3
FACS 403 Professional Development 2
FACS 455 Balancing Work and Family 3
FACS 475 Families Under Stress 3
FACS 499 Family/Consumer Internship 3
Choose four courses (12 hrs) from the following: 2
CHLD 447 Teaching Children Effectively (in Ministry)
ENGL 310 Children’s Literature
FACS 380 Program Planning and Evaluation
PSYC 221 Psychology of Childhood
PSYC 231 Psychology of Adolescence
PSYC 235 Psychology of Adulthood
PSYC 311 Educational Psychology
PSYC 317 Crisis Intervention
PSYC 336 Gerontology
PSYC 345 Exceptional Child
PSYC 361 Marriage and Family
SOCI 201 Social Problems
SOWK 200 Introduction to Social Work and Human Services
Directed Courses (Required) (1-10 hrs)
BIOL 102 Principles of Human Biology 3*
NAT SCI - LAB 1*
ECON 110 Survey of Economics 3*
OR
ECON 214 Principles of Macroeconomics
PSYC 210 Developmental Psychology 3*
Free Electives (14-18 hrs)
TOTAL HOURS: 120 hours minimum; at least 32 hours must be 300-400 level.
* These courses are approved General Education courses and may be counted in the Core Competency Requirements

Or HLTH 330

9 hrs must be upper level

Family and Consumer Sciences Major (B.S.)
General Education: Core Competency Requirements (59-63 hrs)
Courses in the Major (36 hrs)
FACS 103 Introduction to Family and Consumer Sciences 1
FACS 130 Introduction to Hospitality, Foods, and Food Safety 3
FACS 205 Development of Contemporary Families 3
FACS 221 Design and Construction I for Interiors 3
OR
FACS 222 Design and Construction I for Apparel
FACS 330 Human Nutrition  1 3
FACS 350 Family Economic Decisions 3
FACS 380 Program Planning and Evaluation 3
FACS 403 Professional Development 2
FACS 455 Balancing Work and Family 3
FACS 499 Family/Consumer Internship 3
FACS - Electives [Two courses (6 hrs) must be upper level] 9
Directed Courses (Required) (1-10 hrs)
BIOL 102 Principles of Human Biology 3*
NAT SCI - LAB 1
ECON 110 Survey of Economics 3*
OR
ECON 214 Principles of Macroeconomics
PSYC 210 Developmental Psychology 3*
Free Electives (20-24 hrs) [9 hours must be upper level]
TOTAL HOURS: 120 hours minimum; at least 32 hours must be 300-400 level.
* These courses are approved General Education courses and may be counted in the Core Competency Requirements

Or HLTH 330

Family and Consumer Sciences (B.S.) Teacher Licensure Requirements (Grades 6–12)
General Education: Core Competency Requirements (59-63 hrs)
Courses in the Major (33 hrs)
FACS 103 Introduction to Family and Consumer Sciences 1
FACS 130 Introduction to Hospitality, Foods, and Food Safety 3
FACS 205 Development of Contemporary Families 3
FACS 221 Design and Construction I for Interiors 3
OR
FACS 222 Design and Construction I for Apparel
FACS 240 Concepts in Interior Design 3
FACS 330 Human Nutrition  1 3
FACS 350 Family Economic Decisions 3
FACS 370 Parenting 3
FACS 380 Program Planning and Evaluation 3
FACS 403 Professional Development 2
FACS 455 Balancing Work and Family 3
FACS 475 Families Under Stress 3
Directed Courses (Required) (0-10 hrs)
BIOL 102 Principles of Human Biology 3*
NAT SCI Lab 1
ECON 110 Survey of Economics 3*
OR
ECON 214 Principles of Macroeconomics
PSYC 210 Developmental Psychology 3*
Teacher Licensure Requirements (25 hrs)
EDUC 125 Introduction to Education 1
EDUC 221 Content Area Reading and Differentiated Teaching and Learning (Secondary) 2
EDUC 235 Instructional Design: Secondary 1
EDUC 236 Instructional Design Practicum: Secondary 2
EDUC 240 Introduction to Applied Educational Technology Practicum 2
EDUC 360 Foundations of Education 2
FACS 480 Teaching Family and Consumer Sciences 2
FACS 481 Teaching Family and Consumer Sciences Practicum 1
Professional Semester
EDUC 475 Seminar in Classroom Management 2
EDUC 476 Student Teaching I 5
EDUC 477 Student Teaching II 5
Free Electives (0-2 hrs) [2 hrs must be upper level]
TOTAL HOURS: 120 hours minimum; at least 39 hours must be 300-400 level.
* These courses are approved General Education courses and may be counted in the Core Competency Requirements

Or HLTH 330

Fashion Merchandising and Interiors Major (B.S.) Fashion Merchandising Concentration
General Education: Core Competency Requirements (59-63 hrs)
Core Courses (18 hrs)
FACS 103 Introduction to Family and Consumer Sciences 1
FACS 205 Development of Contemporary Families 3
FACS 320 Textiles: Fibers and Fabrics 3
FACS 350 Family Economic Decisions 3
FACS 403 Professional Development 2
FACS 455 Balancing Work and Family 3
FACS 499 Family/Consumer Internship 3
Concentration Courses (18 hrs)
FACS 222 Design and Construction I for Apparel 3
FACS 225 Introduction to the Fashion Industry 3
FACS 423 Fashion Promotion and Visual Merchandising 3
FACS 425 Design and Construction II 3
FACS 429 History of Costume 3
Choose one course from the following: 3
FACS 113 Introduction to Design
FACS 325 Psycho-Social Aspects of Clothing
FACS 420 Apparel Illustration and Design
FACS 497 Special Topics in Family and Consumer Sciences
Directed Courses (Required) (19-28 hrs)
BIOL 102 Principles of Human Biology 3*
NAT SCI - LAB 1*
ECON 214 Principles of Macroeconomics 3*
PSYC 210 Developmental Psychology 3*
ARTS 210 Drawing I 3
ACCT 211 Principles of Accounting I 3
BUSI 301 Business Law 3
BUSI 310 Principles of Management 3
BUSI 472 Organizational Ethics 3
BUSI 303 International Business 3
OR
BUSI 330 Principles of Marketing
Free Electives (2-6 hrs)
TOTAL HOURS: 120 minimum; at least 35 hours must be 300-400 level.
* These courses are approved General Education courses and may be counted in the Core Competency Requirements
Fashion Merchandising and Interiors Major (B.S.) Interior Design Concentration
General Education: Core Competency Requirements (59-63 hrs)
Core Courses (18 hrs)
FACS 103 Introduction to Family and Consumer Sciences 1
FACS 205 Development of Contemporary Families 3
FACS 320 Textiles: Fibers and Fabrics 3
FACS 350 Family Economic Decisions 3
FACS 403 Professional Development 2
FACS 455 Balancing Work and Family 3
FACS 499 Family/Consumer Internship 3
Concentration Courses (18 hrs)
FACS 221 Design and Construction I for Interiors 3
FACS 240 Concepts in Interior Design 3
FACS 340 Housing: Consumer and Community 3
FACS 345 Interior Architecture 3
FACS 445 History of Interiors 3
Choose one course from the following: 3
FACS 113 Introduction to Design
FACS 245 Decorative Arts for the Interiors
FACS 497 Special Topics in Family and Consumer Sciences
Directed Courses (Required) (19-28 hrs)
BIOL 102 Principles of Human Biology 3*
NAT SCI - LAB 1*
ECON 214 Principles of Macroeconomics 3*
PSYC 210 Developmental Psychology 3*
ARTS 210 Drawing I 3
ACCT 211 Principles of Accounting I 3
BUSI 301 Business Law 3
BUSI 310 Principles of Management 3
BUSI 472 Organizational Ethics 3
BUSI 303 International Business 3
OR
BUSI 330 Principles of Marketing
Free Electives (2-6 hrs)
TOTAL HOURS: 120 minimum; at least 35 hours must be 300-400 level.
* These courses are approved General Education courses and may be counted in the Core Competency Requirements

Family and Consumer Sciences Minors

Family and Consumer Sciences Minor: General (16 hrs)
FACS 103 Introduction to Family and Consumer Sciences 1
FACS 130 Introduction to Hospitality, Foods, and Food Safety 3
FACS 205 Development of Contemporary Families 3
FACS 221 Design and Construction I for Interiors 3
OR
FACS 222 Design and Construction I for Apparel
FACS 230 Food Science and Management 3
Choose one course (3 hrs) from the following: 3
FACS 240 Concepts in Interior Design
FACS 330 Human Nutrition
OR
HLTH 330 Human Nutrition
FACS 350 Family Economic Decisions
Family and Consumer Sciences Minor: Foods and Nutrition (15 hrs)
FACS 130 Introduction to Hospitality, Foods, and Food Safety 3
FACS 230 Food Science and Management 3
FACS 330 Human Nutrition 3
OR
HLTH 330 Human Nutrition
Choose two courses (6 hrs) from: 6
FACS 335 Food and Culture
FACS 430 Gourmet Foods
FACS 435 Event Catering
FACS 490 Special Projects
FACS 495 Directed Research
FACS 499 Family/Consumer Internship
FACS - Food/Nutrition Electives
Family and Consumer Sciences Minor: Clothing and Textiles (15 hrs)
FACS 222 Design and Construction I for Apparel 3
FACS 320 Textiles: Fibers and Fabrics 3
Choose three courses (9 hrs) from the following: 9
FACS 325 Psycho-Social Aspects of Clothing
FACS 420 Apparel Illustration and Design
FACS 425 Design and Construction II
FACS 429 History of Costume
FACS 490 Special Projects
FACS 495 Directed Research
FACS 499 Family/Consumer Internship
Family and Consumer Sciences Minor: Family and Child Development (15 hrs)
FACS 205 Development of Contemporary Families 3
FACS 260 Early Childhood Education 3
FACS 370 Parenting 3
Choose two courses (6 hrs) from the following: 6
FACS 365 Daycare Administration
FACS 475 Families Under Stress
FACS 490 Special Projects
FACS 495 Directed Research
FACS 499 Family/Consumer Internship
PSYC 361 Marriage and Family

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Department of History

David L. Snead, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
Chair, Department of History
Professor of History

Samuel C. Smith, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
Assistant Chair, Department of History
Director, Graduate Program History
Associate Professor of History

RESIDENTIAL FACULTY
Distinguished Professor
Rist

Professor
Schultz, Snead

Associate Professor
Blass, Mann, Saxon, Smith, S.C.

Assistant Professor
Jones, C., Smith, C.


PURPOSE
The History Department is committed to teaching and training students toward a Christian worldview of history. Offering general education courses, major programs and graduate courses, the Department provides comprehensive instruction in history and historical methodology, encourages students to develop an integrated Christian worldview and an appreciation for America’s cultural distinctives, equips them for service, and prepares them for further education and careers.


History Major (B.A. and B.S.)

PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES
The student will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate mastery of a breadth of general knowledge of the field of history.
  2. Apply biblical principles to the problems and issues of history.
  3. Research historical topics and critically analyze historical literature, documents and data with historiographical and interpretative sophistication.
  4. Convey and analyze ideas in writing.
  5. Evaluate the significance of world societies and cultures.

Social Sciences Major (B.S.)

PURPOSE
The Social Sciences major is designed to have a core in history with additional coursework in geography, government, and economics.

PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES
The student will be able to:

  1. Evaluate how various factors have influenced the development of history and civilization.
  2. Apply biblical principles to the problems and issues of history.
  3. Research historical topics and critically analyze historical literature, documents and data with historiographical and interpretative sophistication.
  4. Convey and analyze ideas in writing.
  5. Evaluate the significance of world societies and cultures.

TEACHER LICENSURE
Teacher preparation and endorsement in social studies is available through the Department of History in cooperation with the Teacher Education Department. Those wishing to pursue teaching-related programs should seek information from the Teacher Licensure Office in the School of Education. Licensure information is also available at www.liberty.edu/uguide. All teacher licensure programs have been approved by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE).

PHI ALPHA THETA HONOR SOCIETY
Advisor: Dr. David Snead
Phi Alpha Theta is dedicated to recognizing and encouraging excellence in the study of history. Chapter activities provide members with opportunities for sharing and advancing their professional interests. Lectures and field trips are designed to awaken historical interest, and to promote interaction between students and faculty. An annual regional meeting builds rapport with chapters at neighboring institutions.

Criteria for membership: An undergraduate student must have completed at least twelve semester hours in history with a grade in all history courses averaging at least a 3.10 and must have a general average of at least a 3.00 in all classes.


Career Opportunities

Archaeologist Market Researcher
Architectural Historian Museum Curatorship
Archival Management Oral Historian
Bibliographer Manager of Historical Societies
Data Processor for Investment Firms
Public Policy Director
Diplomat Records and Information Manager
Genealogist Research Assistant
Historian for Government Agencies Research/Reference Librarian
Historian for Business Corporations Researcher/Writer for Historical Films
Historical Editor Researcher/Writer for Media
Historical Preservationist Social Scientist
Information Consultant Teacher
Lawyer  

Programs of Study

History Major (B.A.)
General Education: Core Competency Requirements (53-57 hrs)
Liberal Arts Focus: Language Requirements (12 hrs) Must be one language; 6 hours must be at the 200 level or above.
Integrative Studies (6 hrs)
Major Core (9 hrs)
HIUS 221 Survey of American History I 3
HIUS 222 Survey of American History II 3
HIST 300 Historical Methodology 3
Concentration: History (27 hrs)
All History courses must be upper level 1 24
HIST 490 Senior Seminar 3
Directed Courses (Required) (9 hrs)
GEOG 200 Introduction to Geography 3
Choose two courses (6 hrs) from the following: 6
BUSI 303 International Business
ECON 110 Survey of Economics
ECON 213 Principles of Microeconomics
ECON 214 Principles of Macroeconomics
GEOG 320 Regional Studies in Geography
GOVT 220 American Government
Free Electives (0-4 hrs) [3 hrs must be upper-level]
TOTAL HOURS: 120 hours minimum required; 33 hours must be 300-400 level.

At least one course to be selected from each of the five clusters: Early Europe, Modern Europe, United States before 1865, United States after 1865 and Third World.

History Major (B.S.)
General Education: Core Competency Requirements (59-63 hrs)
Major Core (12 hrs)
HIUS 221 Survey of American History I 3
HIUS 222 Survey of American History II 3
HIST 300 Historical Methodology 3
HIST 490 Senior Seminar 3
Concentration: History (27 hrs)
All History courses must be upper level 1 27
Directed Courses (Required) (6-9 hrs)
HIEU 202 History of Western Civilization II 3
Choose two courses (6 hrs) from the following: 6
ECON 110 Survey of Economics *
ECON 213 Principles of Microeconomics *
ECON 214 Principles of Macroeconomics *
GOVT 220 American Government *
GEOG 320 Regional Studies in Geography
Free Electives (12-16 hrs) 2
TOTAL HOURS: 120 hours minimum required; 42 hours must be 300-400 level.
Approved General Education courses may be counted in Core Competency Requirements

At least one course to be selected from each of the five clusters: Early Europe, Modern Europe, United States before 1865, United States after 1865 and Third World.

Free Electives (12-16 hrs)[9 hours must be upper-level]

Social Sciences Major (B.S.)
General Education: Core Competency Requirements (59-63 hrs)
History Requirements (15 hrs)
HIUS 221 Survey of American History I 3
HIUS 222 Survey of American History II 3
HIWD 370 Comparative Civilization 3
HIST 300 Historical Methodology 3
OR
HIST 419 Secondary Social Studies Teaching Methods
AND
HIST 420 Secondary Teaching Methods Practicum
HIST 490 Senior Seminar 3
History Cluster Courses (15 hrs)
All History courses must be upper level 1 15
Government Courses (6 hrs)
GOVT 220 American Government 3
GOVT - Elective (upper level) 3
Economics/Geography Support Courses (9 hrs)
ECON 213 Principles of Microeconomics 3
GEOG 200 Introduction to Geography 3
GEOG - Elective (upper level) 3
Directed Courses (Required) (0-9 hrs)
GOVT 200 Constitutional Government and Free Enterprise 3*
HIEU 201 History of Western Civilization I 3*
HIEU 202 History of Western Civilization II 3*
Free Electives (12-16 hrs) [9 hrs must be upper level]
TOTAL HOURS: 120 hours minimum required; 39 hours must be 300-400 level.
* Approved General Education courses may be counted in Core Competency Requirements

At least one course is to be selected from the five clusters in early Europe, modern Europe, United States before 1865, United States since 1865 and Third World.

Social Sciences (B.S.) Teacher Licensure Requirements (Grades 6-12)
General Education: Core Competency Requirements (59-63 hrs)
History Requirements (12 hrs)
HIUS 221 Survey of American History I 3
HIUS 222 Survey of American History II 3
HIWD 370 Comparative Civilization 3
HIST 490 Senior Seminar 3
History Cluster Courses (15 hrs)
All History courses must be upper level 1 15
Government Courses (6 hrs)
GOVT 220 American Government 3
GOVT - Elective (upper level) 2 3
Economics/Geography Support Courses (9 hrs) 9
ECON 213 Principles of Microeconomics 3
GEOG 200 Introduction to Geography 3
GEOG - Elective (300-400 level) 3
Directed Courses (Required) (3-12 hrs)
HIEU 201 History of Western Civilization I 3*
HIEU 202 History of Western Civilization II 3*
PSYC 210 Developmental Psychology 3*
GOVT 200 Constitutional Government and Free Enterprise 3*
Teacher Licensure Requirements (31 hrs)
EDUC 125 Introduction to Education 1
EDUC 221 Content Area Reading and Differentiated Teaching and Learning (Secondary) 2
EDUC 235 Instructional Design: Secondary 1
EDUC 236 Instructional Design Practicum: Secondary 2
EDUC 240 Introduction to Applied Educational Technology Practicum 2
EDUC 360 Foundations of Education 2
EDUC 425 Secondary Measurement and Evaluation 3
EDUC 435 Secondary Curriculum Fundamentals 2
EDUC 436 Secondary Curriculum Fundamentals Practicum 1
HIST 419 Secondary Social Studies Teaching Methods 2
HIST 420 Secondary Teaching Methods Practicum 1
Professional Semester
EDUC 475 Seminar in Classroom Management 2
EDUC 476 Student Teaching I 5
EDUC 477 Student Teaching II 5
TOTAL HOURS: 135 hours minimum required; 50 hours must be 300-400 level.
* Approved General Education courses may be counted in Core Competency Requirements

At least one course is to be selected from the five clusters in early Europe, modern Europe, U.S. before 1865, U.S. since 1865 and Third World.

Students should take American Government courses


History Minor

History Minor (15 hrs)
Choose three courses from U.S. and European History Surveys (9 hrs) 9
HIUS 221 Survey of American History I
HIUS 222 Survey of American History II
HIEU 201 History of Western Civilization I
HIEU 202 History of Western Civilization II
HIST - Electives (300-400 level) 9

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Department of Mathematics

Robert B. Young, Jr., B.S., M.S.
Chair, Department of Mathematics
Assistant Professor of Mathematics

Timothy Van Voorhis, B.S., M.S., Ph.D.
Associate Chair, Department of Mathematics
Associate Professor of Mathematics

RESIDENTIAL FACULTY
Professor
Dinsmore, Kester, Skoumbourdis, Van Eaton

Associate Professor
Schweitzer, Van Voorhis, Wang

Assistant Professor
Cook, Grayson, Smith, E., Sprano, Young, R.


PURPOSE
The Department of Mathematics plans, develops and maintains quality bachelor degree programs that comply with regional accreditation standards. The Department of Mathematics also seeks to maintain efficient, cost effective strategies in the administration and delivery of its degree programs.

The Department of Mathematics offers a major and minor in mathematics. In addition, courses for general education credit are offered in physical science and physics, as well as mathematics. The purpose of the department is to provide:

  1. General education courses and support courses for all students, resident and non-resident;
  2. Education in both the theory and applications of the mathematical sciences for its majors;
  3. An appreciation of the importance of the role the mathematical sciences play in society; and
  4. Experience in the use of a Computer Algebra System (CAS) in a laboratory setting.

Mathematics Major (B.S.)

PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES
The student will be able to:

  1. Solve problems using the appropriate mathematical expertise.
  2. Use abstract reasoning to rigorously evaluate mathematical hypothesis, and formulate and communicate mathematical analysis and arguments.
  3. Critically analyze and investigate complex phenomena of the physical and/or socio-economic worlds by representing these problems mathematically.
  4. Articulate how a biblical/Christian worldview informs one’s vocation and professional practices.
  5. Use appropriate technology to solve practical problems, access mathematical information, and develop mathematical insight.

TEACHER LICENSURE
Teacher preparation and endorsements in mathematics are available through the Department of Mathematics. Those wishing to pursue teacher-related programs should seek information from the Teacher Licensure Office in the School of Education. The Department is NCATE accredited for teacher education. Licensure information is also available at www.liberty.edu/uguide.

KAPPA MU EPSILON HONOR SOCIETY
Advisor: Professor Robert Young
Kappa Mu Epsilon (KME) is a specialized honor society in Mathematics. Each chapter is encouraged to be a working organization throughout the academic year, functioning as an integral part of the mathematics department in the promotion of a number of worthwhile extra-curricular activities. The objective of KME since its inception has been the fulfillment of its motto which is to “develop an appreciation for the beauty of mathematics.” The purposes of KME are to further the interests of mathematics in those schools which place their primary emphasis on the undergraduate program and to recognize and honor outstanding scholastic achievement among undergraduate students in mathematics.

The criteria for membership are as follows:

  1. Must be or have been a faculty member or a regularly enrolled student at an institution where a Kappa Mu Epsilon chapter is installed;
  2. Must have completed at least three semesters (or five quarters) of the college course and rank in the upper 35% of his/her class;
  3. Must have completed at least three college courses in mathematics including at least one semester (or two quarters) of calculus and attained an average of B or better in all mathematics courses; and
  4. Must have completed at least one semester (one quarter) at the institution, or must have transferred from another institution, and have completed at least one mathematics course with a B or better at the institution prior to his/her induction into membership.

Election to membership shall be irrespective of membership in any other organization, and no person shall be excluded on the grounds of sex, race, creed, or color.


Career Opportunities

Graduate School
Mathematics Sciences (medical and non-medical)
Statistics Computer Science
Actuarial Science Finance/Economics
Applied Mathematics  
Job Market
Any industry requiring problem solving and computer use
Computer Science Operations Research
Data Processing Financial and Insurance Industries
Engineering  
Teaching
Private Schools Public Schools

Programs of Study

Mathematics Major (B.S.)
General Education: Core Competency Requirements (59-63 hrs)
Courses in the Major (40 hrs)
MATH 131 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I 4
MATH 132 Calculus and Analytic Geometry II 4
MATH 133 Calculus with Mathematica Lab 1
MATH 200 Introduction to Mathematical Reasoning 2
MATH 211 Introduction to Statistical Analysis 3
MATH 231 Calculus and Analytical Geometry III 4
MATH 321 Linear Algebra 3
MATH 421 Elementary Abstract Algebra I 3
MATH 431 Real Analysis 3
Choose one course from: 3
MATH 305 Modern Geometry
MATH 332 Advanced Calculus
MATH 334 Differential Equations
Choose one course from: 3
MATH 307 Introductory Number Theory
MATH 331 Complex Analysis
MATH 422 Elementary Abstract Algebra II  1
Choose one course from: 3
MATH 301 Methods of Operations Research
MATH 302 Introduction to Experimental Design in Statistics
MATH 350 Discrete Mathematics
MATH 352 Numerical Analysis
MATH 401 Introduction to Mathematical Statistics
MATH Elective (300-400 level) 3
MATH 450 Mathematics Capstone Seminar 1
Directed Courses (Required) (2-14 hrs)
PHYS 231 University Physics I 4*
PHYS 232 University Physics II 4*
CSCI 110 Computing Foundations and Ethics 3*
CSCI 111 Introduction to Programming 3*
Free Electives (15-19 hrs) [11 hrs must be upper level]
TOTAL HOURS: 120 hours minimum required; 33 hours must be 300-400 level.
* Approved General Education courses may be counted in the Core Competency Requirements

MATH 401 or 422 must be part of the degree program

Mathematics (B.S.) Teacher Licensure Requirements (Grades 6 – 12)
General Education: Core Competency Requirements (59-63 hrs)
Courses in the Major (40 hrs)
MATH 131 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I 4
MATH 132 Calculus and Analytic Geometry II 4
MATH 133 Calculus with Mathematica Lab 1
MATH 200 Introduction to Mathematical Reasoning 2
MATH 211 Introduction to Statistical Analysis 3
MATH 231 Calculus and Analytical Geometry III 4
MATH 305 Modern Geometry 3
MATH 321 Linear Algebra 3
MATH 400 History of Mathematics 3
MATH 421 Elementary Abstract Algebra I 3
MATH 431 Real Analysis 3
Choose one course from: 3
MATH 307 Introductory Number Theory
MATH 331 Complex Analysis
MATH 422 Elementary Abstract Algebra II
Choose one course from: 3
MATH 301 Methods of Operations Research
MATH 302 Introduction to Experimental Design in Statistics
MATH 350 Discrete Mathematics
MATH 352 Numerical Analysis
MATH 401 Introduction to Mathematical Statistics
MATH 450 Mathematics Capstone Seminar 1
Directed Courses (Required) (2-17 hrs)
CSCI 110 Computing Foundations and Ethics 3*
CSCI 111 Introduction to Programming 3*
PHYS 231 University Physics I 4*
PHYS 232 University Physics II 4*
PSYC 210 Developmental Psychology 3*
Teacher Licensure Requirements (31 hrs)
EDUC 125 Introduction to Education 1
EDUC 221 Content Area Reading and Differentiated Teaching and Learning (Secondary) 2
EDUC 235 Instructional Design: Secondary 1
EDUC 236 Instructional Design Practicum: Secondary 2
EDUC 240 Introduction to Applied Educational Technology Practicum 2
EDUC 360 Foundations of Education 2
EDUC 425 Secondary Measurement and Evaluation 3
EDUC 435 Secondary Curriculum Fundamentals 2
EDUC 436 Secondary Curriculum Fundamentals Practicum 1
MATH 419 Teaching Mathematics in Secondary Schools 2
MATH 420 Teaching Mathematics in Secondary Schools Practicum 1
Professional Semester
EDUC 475 Seminar in Classroom Management 2
EDUC 476 Student Teaching I 5
EDUC 477 Student Teaching II 5
TOTAL HOURS: 132 hours minimum required; 45 hours must be 300-400 level.
* Approved General Education courses may be counted in the Core Competency Requirements

Mathematics Minor

Mathematics Minor (23 hrs)
MATH 131 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I 4
MATH 132 Calculus and Analytic Geometry II 4
MATH 133 Calculus with Mathematica Lab 1
MATH 200 Introduction to Mathematical Reasoning 2
MATH 211 Introduction to Statistical Analysis 3
MATH Electives 9
MATH 231 and 6 hours 300-400 level courses
OR
9 hours 300-400 level courses

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Department of Philosophy

Gary R. Habermas, B.R.E., M.A., Ph.D.
Chair, Department of Philosophy
Distinguished Research Professor of Apologetics and Philosophy

Edward N. Martin, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
Co-Chair Department of Philosophy
Director, Master of Arts in Philosophical Studies
Professor of Philosophy and Theology

RESIDENTIAL FACULTY
Distinguished Research Professor
Habermas

Professor
Beck, Foreman, Hinkson, Martin, E., Provenzola

Associate Professor
Jones, M.


Philosophy Major (B.A.)

It should be observed that the B.A. in Philosophy equips the student with critical skills, knowledge, and values to positively impact today's world.  Philosophy majors rank high on the GRE exam in the verbal section presumably because of Philosophy's central repeated emphasis on carefully-honed written communication, analytic conceptualization of complex ideas, and a masterful articulation of those ideas using metaphors, models, and other heuristic and communicative devices to express thoughts in clear and understandable terms.  The program focuses on classical philosophical subdisciplines, including metaphysics, epistemology, logic, aesthetics, and ethics, and provides a strong, impactful foundation for further studies in many diverse fields at the graduate level and beyond, including in seminary, law, and the sciences.  Philosophical analysis is not only excellent preparation for ministry, but also serves as the first step toward graduate studies in English, Theology, ministry, leadership or management, business, counseling, History, politics, law, philosophy, and a great range of other related fields (such as philology, ancient or modern languages, mathematics, linguistics, art history, journalism, government, etc.).

PURPOSE
The major in Philosophy is designed to provide a thorough, biblically-based, cognitive, and spiritual foundation for effective ministry and advanced studies in Philosophy, Law, Apologetics, Theology and a wide diversity of related areas of study.  For over two millennia Philosophy has been recognized as one of the leading "liberal arts" available to teach and train the soul to become wise and prepared for service to God and neighbor, since the study of Philosophy has as its goal the development of the person in all those areas that constitute human flourishing and maturity.  The Apostle Paul speaks of these areas together constituting for the Christian believer what we normally call "spiritual growth," as seen, e.g., in the five or six recognizable areas of requirements for elders in the church (cf. I Tim 3, Titus 1), namely, intellectual, moral, social, psychological, physical and emotional development of the cardinal virtues (wisdom, justice, courage, temperance) and Christian virtues (faith, hope and love).

PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES
The student will be able to:

  1. Conduct research using primary and secondary sources in an informed and critical way.
  2. Evaluate the central concepts and arguments in the history of Western Philosophy.
  3. Compare and contrast Christian and non-Christian theories of reality, knowledge, and value.
  4. Defend a philosophically informed worldview.

PHI SIGMA TAU – INTERNATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY IN PHILOSOPHY
Advisor: Dr. Thomas A. Provenzola
PHI SIGMA TAU has as its essential purpose to promote ties among philosophy departments in accredited institutions and students in philosophy nationally. The Society exists with the following objectives: (1) to serve as a means of awarding distinction to students having high scholarship and personal interest in philosophy; (2) to promote student interest in research and advance study in this field; (3) to provide opportunities for the publication of student research papers of merit; (4) to encourage a professional spirit and friendship among those who have displayed marked ability in this field; and (5) to popularize interest in philosophy among the general collegiate public.  The Society sponsors several colloquia and conferences, on both a local and national level, throughout the academic year.

Criteria for Membership:
Undergraduate students are eligible for active membership if they have completed three semesters of college course work, are ranked in the upper 35% of their class, and have completed (or are registered in) at least two semester courses (six credit hours) in philosophy with a mean overall grade which is greater than a 3.00.

Graduate members are eligible if they (a) meet the requirements for undergraduates, or (b) have completed at least one third of the residence requirements of the Master's Degree with a mean grade of 3.50.


Career Opportunities

Education/Teaching Law
Pastor Counseling
Campus/ Parachurch Ministry Computer Science
Hospital Ethicist Information Technology
Publishing/Journalism Leadership & Management
Government Administration
Human Rights Advocate Apologist
Theologian Cultural Commentator
Classical Christian School Business Entrepreneur
    Teacher (esp. Logic) Christian Educator

Program of Study

Philosophy Major (B.A.)
General Education: Core Competency Requirements (53-57 hrs)
Language Requirements (12 hrs) Must be one language; German or French is recommended
Concentration Courses (33 hrs)
PHIL 210 Logic 3
PHIL 240 Christian Evidences 3
PHIL 301 History of Philosophy I 3
PHIL 302 History of Philosophy II 3
PHIL 303 History of Philosophy III 3
PHIL 310 Symbolic Logic 3
PHIL 350 Ethics 3
PHIL 420 Epistemology 3
PHIL 430 Metaphysics 3
PHIL 440 Philosophy of Religion 3
PHIL 497 Special Topics in Philosophy 3
Directed Requirements (9 hrs)
CHHI 301 History of the Christian Church I 3
CHHI 302 History of the Christian Church II 3
THEO 350 Fundamental Theological Issues 3
Free Electives (3-7 hrs)
TOTAL HOURS: 120 hours minimum required; at least 42 hours must be 300-400 level.

Philosophy Minor

Philosophy Minor (15 hrs)
Choose one of the following courses: 3
PHIL 301 History of Philosophy I
PHIL 302 History of Philosophy II
PHIL 303 History of Philosophy III
PHIL Electives (at least 9 hrs of which are 300-400 level) 12


Highlighted text indicates a change from the official version of the catalog.