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Graduate Catalog 2012-2013

School of Health Sciences

Ralph F. Linstra, B.S., M.Ed., Ed.D., C.H.E.S.
Interim Dean, School of Health Sciences
Professor of Health Professions


Beverly S. Mahoney, R.N., B.S., M.S., Ph.D., M.C.H.E.S., F.A.S.H.A., F.A.A.H.E.
Associate Dean, School of Health Sciences
Acting Chair, Department of Health Professions
Professor of Health Professions


Steve E. Warren, B.S., M.A.
Associate Dean, School of Health Sciences
Assistant Professor of Psychology


Phillip Williams, B.S., M.A.C.E.
Associate Dean, School of Health Sciences
Instructor of Psychology


PURPOSE
The School of Health Sciences provides students graduate education and skill development opportunities in Counseling, Family Studies, Nursing and Public Health with an emphasis on the Christian worldview.


Center for Counseling and Family Studies

Tim Clinton, B.S., M.A., Ed.S., Ed.D., LPC
Executive Director, Center for Counseling and Family Studies
Professor of Counseling and Practical Theology


Victor Hinson, B.A., M.Div., M.A., Ed.D., LPC
Chair, Center for Counseling and Family Studies
Associate Professor of Counseling


Patricia A. Hinkley, B.S., M.A., Ed.D.
Chair, Center for Counseling and Family Studies
Associate Professor of Counseling and Psychology


Allen Meyer, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
Chair, Center for Counseling and Family Studies
Assistant Professor of Counseling


Mark J. Myers, B.S., M.A.R., M.R.E., Ph.D.
Chair, Center for Counseling and Family Studies
Assistant Professor of Counseling


Elias S. L. Moitinho, B.S., M.R.E., M.A., Ph.D., LPC-S, LMFT, BCPCC
Director, MA Counseling Licensure Programs
Associate Professor of Counseling


Clay E. Peters, II, B.A., B.S., M.A., M.S.C.J., Ed.D., LPC
Director, Master of Arts in Human Services
Associate Professor of Counseling


Gary Sibcy, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., LP, LPC, LMFT
Director, Ph.D. Program in Counseling
Director, Center for Research and Evaluation
Associate Professor of Counseling


Lisa S. Sosin, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., LLP, LPC
Associate Director, Ph.D. Program in Counseling
Associate Professor of Counseling

RESIDENTIAL FACULTY
Professor
Barker, E.; Clinton; Garzon; Hawkins, R.; Wheeler, W.; Volk

Associate
Brooks; Corsini; Daniel; Hawkins, S.; Hinkley; Hinson; Jenkins; Moitinho; O’Hare; Peters; Sibcy; Sosin; Thomas, J.

Assistant
Deacon; Knight; Meyer; Myers

DISTANCE EDUCATION FACULTY
Assistant
Anders; Appleby; Bender Long; Bjerke; Breazeale; Brooks, S.; Burchard; Byars; Chara; Combs; Cooper, M. E.; Coy; Cross; Davis, J. L.; Deel; Dumont; Dunn, G.; Evans, A.; Evans, T.; Farwell; Ferreira, C.; Ferreira, J.; Fisher; Fox; Garcia; Gates; Gho; Giammatteo; Gilliland; Gorbett; Grice; Gulley; Heck; Hickman; Hill, A.; Hobbs; Holland, W.; Hollis; Hull; Huson; Jackson, D.; Jenkins, C.; Johnson, S. G.; Johnson, S. A.; Joyce; Katz; Kilian; Kim, J. D.; Kitzmiller; Laatsch; Lane, D.; Larimore; Lewis, S. R.; McCreary; McIvor; Miller, D.; Mills, M.; Mooney; Moore, R. L.; Mosholder; Myers, J. K.; Niebuhr; Pace; Pangle; Parker, F.; Pawlowski; Pinkston; Powell; Rackley; Rice, D.; Roberts, W.; Robinson, S.; Rolen; Sadik; Sanders, K.; Small, D.; Smith, A. W.; Smith, R. P.; Smylie; Snodgrass; Stanley; Staten; Stille; Taylor, R.; Tetrault; Thomas, C. N.; Vareene-Thomas; Verga; Warren, J.; Washington; Welch; West; Westmeier; Wiinamaki; Williams, C.; Wilson, J.; Wilson, W.; Wright, J.; Zapf


PURPOSE
The Center for Counseling and Family Studies provides graduate education and training to prepare individuals for service as professionals within both the Christian and secular communities.  Both the master’s and doctoral programs are offered to prepare students to work as counselor educators, supervisors, and advanced practitioners in academic, ministry, and clinical settings, as well as prepare them for leadership roles in other various human service fields. The M.A. programs also provide foundational studies that equip students to pursue doctoral studies and careers in community mental health and human service agencies, educational institutions, private practice, government, and business and industrial settings. 

The Graduate Counseling Program, launched in 1981, is committed to providing quality professional training for healing human hurts from a perspective permeated by Christian faith.  Our training in theory and practice of counseling is designed for those seeking career opportunities in mental health agencies, hospital programs, private practices, church-related counseling centers, and other public and private facilities.

Both the master’s and doctoral program are offered to prepare students to work as counselor educators, supervisors, and advanced practitioners in academic ministry, and clinical settings.  The M.A. program provides foundational studies that equip students for licensure, to pursue doctoral students and careers in community mental health and human service agencies, educational institutions, private practice, government, and business and industrial settings.



Master of Arts in Professional Counseling
Master of Arts in Marriage and Family Therapy
Master of Arts in Human Services

The Professional Counseling and/or Marriage and Family Therapy licensure program(s) at Liberty University/Liberty University Online may not fulfill licensure requirements for the states of Arkansas, Illinois, Kansas, Missouri, and New Hampshire. Students wishing to pursue professional counseling licensure in these states should contact the appropriate state licensing board for more information.

The state of Mississippi does not accept the Master of Arts in Marriage and Family Therapy degree earned through Liberty University Online for licensure purposes.

PROGRAM SPECIFIC ADMISSION PROCEDURES
In addition to the General Admission Procedures outlined in this Catalog, Master’s applicants to any of our Counseling programs must have (variations in italics):

  1. An earned baccalaureate degree or its equivalent from an institution accredited by an agency recognized by the U.S. Department of Education (e.g., SACS, TRACS, ABHE, etc.);
  2. An undergraduate cumulative GPA of at least 3.00 (on a 4.00 scale). Applicants to the M.A. in Human Services are required to hold an undergraduate cumulative GPA of at least 2.00 (on a 4.00 scale)
  3. Successfully completed a minimum of six semester hours of coursework in psychology or a closely related field of study (e.g., sociology, human services) and three hours of statistics. Applicants for the 30-hour M.A. in Human Services are not required to complete prerequisite work.

Applicants must submit each of the items listed in the General Admissions Procedures to the Office of Graduate Admissions before being considered for acceptance to the program.

Applicants who have not successfully completed six hours of psychology or related studies and three hours of statistics for the Master’s in Professional Counseling or Marriage and Family Therapy may be admitted with the provision that they must complete the undergraduate coursework within the first two semesters of study. Applicants who do not meet the minimum GPA requirement may be considered for admission on Academic Probation status. Students admitted on Academic Probation must take and pass GRST 500 – Introduction to Graduate Writing in their first semester.

The applicant’s character, integrity, and general fitness to practice counseling may also be considered in the admission process. In addition, limited resources may indicate a need for limited enrollments, requiring the Center for Counseling and Family Studies to restrict admissions and to entertain special admissions only under exceptional circumstances.

To enable our students to be successful, the Center for Counseling and Family Studies have implemented admissions protocol for students wanting to enter the licensure track programs, but have less than the minimum 3.00 GPA. 

NOTIFICATION OF ADMISSION
Admission decisions normally are made within a few weeks following the receipt of all of the student’s documentation. Official notification of admission, and of any conditions attached to that admission, is sent by letter to the applicant by the Office of Graduate Admissions. Correspondence or notification from other sources does not constitute official notice of admission. The term for which the applicant is admitted is stated in the official admission letter from the Office of Graduate Admissions.

TRANSFER OF CREDIT
Students may transfer up to 6 semester hours of coursework into the 30-hour Human Services program, up to 12 hours of coursework into the 48-hour Professional Counseling program, and up to 15 hours of coursework into the 60-hour Professional Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy programs. For a transferred course to replace a Liberty University course, the following requirements must be met:

  1. The school at which the course was taken must be appropriately accredited.
  2. The course credit must be at least three semester hours or five quarter hours.
  3. The student must have earned a grade of B or better in the course.
  4. The course must overlap one of Liberty’s courses by at least 80%.

Courses related to psychology and counseling that meet all but the last criterion may be transferred in as elective courses. Course work must have been completed within the previous eight years. Transfer credits will not be accepted for the following courses: COUN 501, 505, 506, 507, 512, 667, 698, and 699. Courses from an earned degree will not be accepted for transfer credit. Credit will not be awarded for life experience or continuing education workshops.

Students in the 48- and 60-hour Professional Counseling program are required to take COUN 505, 512, and 667 in residence (on campus). Students in the 60-hour Marriage and Family Therapy program are required to take COUN 505, 512, 610, and 667 in residence (on campus).

Credits from a prior degree earned through Liberty University are considered transfer credits.  Liberty University course work that is more than seven (7) years old must be repeated.

LICENSURE
Liberty University’s Center for Counseling and Family Studies provides academic course work in all areas required by the Virginia Board of Professional Counselors and Marriage and Family Therapists for licensure. The 60-hour M.A. degree program has been designed to meet licensure requirements for LPC in Virginia.  With 12 additional hours of coursework, Liberty University’s M.A. degree (48-hour degree program) is acceptable to meet academic education and degree requirements established by the Virginia Board of Professional Counselors and Marriage and Family Therapists for licensure as a Licensed Professional Counselor, and a Marriage and Family Therapist. Students interested in licensure in other states are required to contact the licensing boards of those states to obtain copies of their licensing laws and regulations.  These will help students ensure they take all courses necessary for licensure in those states.

EVALUATION AND RETENTION
Students are responsible for meeting the academic and professional standards of Liberty University and the counseling profession. The following requirements apply to all students:

  1. Students are expected to use the American Counseling Association “Code of Ethics and Standards of Practice,” the American Association of Christian Counselors “Code of Ethics,” this Catalog, the Student Handbook, and the Liberty Way as guides for their behavior throughout their program. Each of these documents is available for reading and downloading from the respective organizational web sites. Students will undergo periodic evaluation by the Counseling faculty for suitability as students and prospective counselors.
  2. Students must remain in good academic standing, are required to maintain high ethical standards, and must demonstrate evidence of functional competency in fulfilling the professional roles required by the discipline.
  3. Students (other than 30-hour M.A. students) must pass a comprehensive examination that requires an ability to deal with more than individual course content. Satisfactory completion of comprehensive examination requires analysis, synthesis, and integration of the content within the counseling discipline.
  4. Doctoral students must also develop, complete, and defend an acceptable dissertation following guidelines developed by the Graduate Administrative Council and approved by the Graduate Senate.

Consult specific program sections of this catalog for additional requirements.


PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES
The student will be able to:

  1. Illustrate appropriate knowledge in all core curricular areas of counseling in preparation for certification and taking licensure exams and in procuring employment in the mental health field.
  2. Demonstrate appropriate research and report writing skills including the use of APA format and computer technology.
  3. Integrate biblical principles and secular theories in a responsibly eclectic manner.
  4. Incorporate ethical and legal standards in the counseling arena.
  5. Assess, diagnose and treat clients with a broad array of presenting problems and mental disorders using multiple counseling skills in established best practices.

Marriage and Family Therapy

  • The student will be able to evaluate child, adolescent, and marriage and family clients in order to effectively determine a treatment.

Licensure Programs in Counseling

  •  The student will be able to evaluate diverse individual, group and family populations in order to effectively determine a treatment for client(s).

COURSE REQUIREMENTS
The Center for Counseling and Family Studies offers four master’s-level degree programs. The M.A. in Human Services is designed for professionals from all walks of life dedicated not only to career advancement, but impacting tomorrow’s world and the well-being of others in the spirit of Christian services. The degree is grounded in a core of courses developed through the Center for Counseling and Family Studies; a core reflective of the University’s mission statement and designed to provide the values, knowledge, and skills needed for effective work in the vast field of human services. This degree consists of 18 hours of human services courses and a 12 hour cognate from such graduate level academic disciplines as business; communications; marriage and family; executive leadership; health and wellness; Christian ministries; and varied human services fields.

The two M.A. in Professional Counseling programs consist of a minimum of 48 and 60 hours of counseling courses that provide students with a thorough background in the areas of integration of faith and practice; individual and group counseling theories and skills; clinical practice; ethical, professional, and legal issues in counseling; social and cultural factors in counseling; human development across the lifespan; work, leisure, and career development theories and interventions; appraisal and assessment issues in counseling; and the application of research methodology and statistics to understand mental health issues.  These degrees prepare individuals for licensure and national certification and careers in mental health agencies, hospital programs, private practices, ministry-related counseling centers, and other public and private facilities.

The M.A. in Marriage and Family Therapy consists of a minimum of 60 hours; 48 hours of course work from the Professional Counseling program, plus four additional courses: COUN 602, Marriage and Family Counseling II or COUN 611, Counseling Children and Their Families; COUN 603, Pre-Marital and Marital Counseling; COUN 610, Human Sexuality; and COUN 620, Counseling Adolescents and Their Families. Students’ internship experiences must consist of work with couples, families, and individuals from a systems perspective, with the majority of the direct service clock hours occurring with couples and family units. This concentration is appropriate for those seeking licensure as Marriage and Family Therapists (MFT).

The Human Services program (30 hours) typically takes three semesters (1-1/2 years) to complete; the Professional Counseling program (48 hours), five semesters (2-1/2 years) to complete; the Professional Counseling program (60 hours), six semesters (3 years) to complete; and the Marriage and Family Therapy program, (60 hours) six semesters (3 years) to complete.

Detailed information, policies, and procedures regarding the various programs offered are provided in the Student Handbook. Students should familiarize themselves with the Student Handbook before they begin their studies and before they register for classes every semester.


COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION
Students enrolled in the 48- or 60-hour program must take a comprehensive examination. This examination is offered periodically throughout the year. (See the Study Guide for the Counseling Comprehensive Examination for scheduling.)  The study guide is available online on the departmental website at http://www.liberty.edu/academics /arts-sciences/counseling

The comprehensive examination should be taken after the 48 hours of core coursework is completed.  To register for the Comprehensive Exam, please contact counselingcompexam @liberty.edu, 30 days prior to the exam date.  The Comprehensive Exam is offered the third Saturday of February, July, and October.  Students will be given three attempts to successfully complete the exam.


GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
To graduate, students in the M.A. programs must:

  1. Pass the Comprehensive Exam for the 48 and 60 hour Counseling programs and;
  2. Complete the following minimum number of credit hours through Liberty University, not to include credits from a prior degree earned through Liberty:
    1. Master of Arts in Human Services – 30 hours
    2. Master of Arts in Professional Counseling/48-hour track – 36 hours
    3. Master of Arts in Professional Counseling/60-hour track – 45 hours
    4. Master of Arts in Marriage and Family Therapy – 45 hours
  3. The following maximum number of transfer credits, including credits from a degree on the same academic level previously earned through Liberty, may be applied to the degrees:
    1. Master of Arts in Human Services – six (6) hours
    2. Master of Arts in Professional Counseling/48-hour track – 12 hours
    3. Master of Arts in Professional Counseling/60-hour track – 15 hours
    4. Master of Arts in Marriage and Family Therapy – 15 hours
  4. Have completed their required curriculum with a cumulative GPA of 3.00 or better for the 48 and 60 hour Counseling programs or 2.50 or better for the Human Services program. No more than two grades of C may be applied to the 48- and 60 hour counseling programs, and no grades of D may be applied to the Human Services degree or the 48- and 60-hour counseling programs. A student may petition the department for permission to retake a course in which he or she received a grade of C or below. The most recent grade will be recorded on the transcript. Students enrolled in the Human Services program may apply it for six hours of repeated courses, and students in all of the licensure programs may apply it for nine hours.
  5. The Master of Arts in Human Services degree must be completed within five (5) years, and all of the licensure degree programs must be completed within seven (7) years.
  6. Submit a Graduation Application to the Registrar’s Office in the beginning of the final semester.
  7. All Resident students are required to enroll in and pass GRST 500 in their first semester.
  8. All Online students admitted on Academic Probation are required to enroll in and pass GRST 500 in their first semester.

Programs of Study

(M.A.) Master of Arts in Professional Counseling (48-hr track)
Program Options: Online and Resident Formats
COUN 501 Counselor Professional Identity, Function, and Ethics 3
COUN 502 Human Growth and Development 3
COUN 503 Research and Program Evaluation 3
COUN 504 Social and Cultural Foundations in Counseling 3
COUN 505 Counseling Techniques and the Helping Relationship 3*
COUN 506 Integration of Psychology and Theology 3
COUN 507 Theology and Spirituality in Counseling 3
COUN 510 Theories of Counseling 3
COUN 512 Group Process 3*
COUN 521 Individual Appraisal 3
COUN 522 Career Development and Counseling 3
COUN 601 Marriage and Family Counseling I 3
COUN 646 Psychopathology and Counseling 3
COUN 667 Clinical Diagnosis and Treatment Planning 3*
COUN 670 Comprehensive Exam – CPCE **
COUN 671 Comprehensive Exam – Integration **
COUN 698 Practicum 1 3
COUN 699 Counseling Internship 2 3
*Intensive course offered on campus only
** Counseling Comprehensive Exam prerequisites: COUN 501, 502, 503, 504, 505, 506, 510, 512, 521, 522 & 667

May be repeated

May be repeated

(M.A.) Master of Arts in Professional Counseling (60-hr track)
Program Options: Online and Resident Formats
COUN 501 Counselor Professional Identity, Function, and Ethics 3
COUN 502 Human Growth and Development 3
COUN 503 Research and Program Evaluation 3
COUN 504 Social and Cultural Foundations in Counseling 3
COUN 505 Counseling Techniques and the Helping Relationship 3*
COUN 506 Integration of Psychology and Theology 3
COUN 507 Theology and Spirituality in Counseling 3
COUN 510 Theories of Counseling 3
COUN 512 Group Process 3*
COUN 521 Individual Appraisal 3
COUN 522 Career Development and Counseling 3
COUN 601 Marriage and Family Counseling I 3
COUN 646 Psychopathology and Counseling 3
COUN 667 Clinical Diagnosis and Treatment Planning 3*
COUN 670 Comprehensive Exam – CPCE **
COUN 671 Comprehensive Exam – Integration **
COUN 699 Counseling Internship 1 3
COUN 711 Diagnosis and Treatment of Addictive Behaviors 3
Electives 12
Choose four (4) 500-700 level courses from the following disciplines: COUN, CRIS, LIFC and SUBS 2
*Intensive course offered on campus only
** Counseling Comprehensive Exam prerequisites: COUN 501, 502, 503, 504, 505, 506, 510, 512, 521, 522 & 667

May be repeated

COUN elective or seminar must be 600-700 level

(M.A.) Master of Arts in Marriage and Family Therapy (60 hrs)
Program Options: Online and Resident Formats
COUN 501 Counselor Professional Identity, Function, and Ethics 3
COUN 502 Human Growth and Development 3
COUN 503 Research and Program Evaluation 3
COUN 504 Social and Cultural Foundations in Counseling 3
COUN 505 Counseling Techniques and the Helping Relationship 3*
COUN 506 Integration of Psychology and Theology 3
COUN 507 Theology and Spirituality in Counseling 3
COUN 510 Theories of Counseling 3
COUN 512 Group Process 3*
COUN 521 Individual Appraisal 3
COUN 522 Career Development and Counseling 3
COUN 601 Marriage and Family Counseling I 3
COUN 603 Premarital and Marital Counseling 3
COUN 610 Human Sexuality 3*
COUN 620 Counseling Adolescents and Their Families 3
COUN 646 Psychopathology and Counseling 3
COUN 667 Clinical Diagnosis and Treatment Planning 3*
COUN 670 Comprehensive Exam – CPCE **
COUN 671 Comprehensive Exam – Integration **
COUN 698 Practicum 3
COUN 699 Counseling Internship 1 3
Choose one of the following: 3
COUN 602 Marriage and Family Counseling II *
COUN 611 Counseling Children and Their Families
*Intensive course offered on campus only
** Counseling Comprehensive Exam prerequisites: COUN 501, 502, 503, 504, 505, 506, 510, 512, 521, 522 & 667

May be repeated

(M.A.) Master of Arts in Human Services (30 hrs)
Program Options: Online and Resident Formats
Core Courses (18 hrs)
HSER 500 Introduction to Human Services 3
COUN 502 Human Growth and Development 3
COUN 506 Integration of Psychology and Theology 3
HSER 508 Studies in Interpersonal Communication 3
HSER 509 Multicultural Issues in Human Services 3
HSER 511 Group Dynamics 3
Cognate Courses 12
Select from the following options: Business, Christian Ministries, Communication Studies, Criminal Justice, Executive Leadership, Health and Wellness, Marriage and Family, Organizational Studies
BUSINESS COGNATE (12 hrs)
BUSI 520 Strategic Marketing Management 3
BUSI 530 Managerial Finance 3
BMAL 560 Corporate Responsibility 3
BUSI 561 Legal Issues in Business 3
CHRISTIAN MINISTRIES COGNATE (12 hrs)
COMS 542 Communication in Christian Ministry 3
DSMN 601 Ministry of Teaching 3
DSMN 620 Strategic Driven Ministries 3
Choose one of the following: 3
YOUT 510 Foundations in Youth Ministries I
YOUT 520 Foundations in Youth Ministries II
YOUT 597 Seminar in Youth Ministries
YOUT 615 The Role of the Youth Leader
YOUT 630 Student Ministries
COMMUNICATION STUDIES COGNATE (12 hrs)
COMS 520 Communication Theory 3
COMS 542 Communication in Christian Ministry 3
COMS 558 Listening and Nonverbal Communication 3
Choose one of the following: 3
COMS 552 Leadership Communication
COMS 560 Communication and Conflict
COMS 624 Intercultural Communication
CRIMINAL JUSTICE COGNATE (12 hrs)
CJUS 500 Criminal Justice Integration 3
CJUS 520 Administration of Justice Organizations 3
CJUS 530 Human Resource Management in Criminal Justice Organizations 3
CJUS 550 Topics and Trends in Criminal Justice 3
EXECUTIVE LEADERSHIP COGNATE (12 hrs)
CLED 510 Biblical Foundations of Christian Leadership 3
CLED 520 The Life of the Leader 3
CLED 610 Team Leadership and Conflict Resolution 3
CLED 620 Vision and Strategic Planning 3
HEALTH AND WELLNESS COGNATE (12 hrs)
NURS 501 Health Policy/Ethics 3
NURS 503 Managing Population Health 3
NURS 519 Strategies for End of Life Care 3
NURS 668 Health/Wellness Capstone Project 3
MARRIAGE AND FAMILY COGNATE (12 hrs)
COUN 501 Counselor Professional Identity, Function, and Ethics 3*
COUN 505 Counseling Techniques and the Helping Relationship 3*
COUN 601 Marriage and Family Counseling I 3
COUN 603 Premarital and Marital Counseling 3
*COUN 510, COUN 602, COUN 611, and COUN 620 are approved substitutions for COUN 501 and COUN 505.
MILITARY RESILIENCE COGNATE (12 hrs)
MILT 525 Advanced Resilience for Leaders and Caregivers 3
MILT 575 Resilient Marriage and Family 3
MILT 625 Military Career and Community Transition 3
MILT 675 Advanced Military Mental & Behavioral Health 3
ORGANIZATIONAL STUDIES COGNATE (12 hrs)
BMAL 500 Organizational Behavior 3
CLED 620 Vision and Strategic Planning 3
COMS 622 Organizational Communication Theory and Practice 3
COMS 652 Organizational Communication Consulting 3

The Master of Arts in Human Services program is available with a Cognate in Children, Families, and the Law.  This cognate is open only to currently enrolled Liberty University School of Law J.D. students or Liberty University School of Law Alumni.  For more information on this cognate please see the Liberty University School of Law section of this Catalog.

DEGREE COMPLETION PLANS (DCP)
The Degree Completion Plans for the Master of Arts in Counseling programs and the Master of Arts in Human Services program are available online at http://www.liberty.edu/dcps.


Doctor of Philosophy in Counseling (Ph.D.)

PURPOSE
The terminal Ph.D. in Counseling allows the University to prepare professionals for clinical practice, education, and ministry who demonstrate the highest level of clinical competence and scholarship in their approach to their vocation.  Students who enroll in the Ph.D. program are professionals who see their work as a calling to serve God by facilitating bio-psycho-social-spiritual wholeness and healing.

The Ph.D. in counseling is distinctive in its integration of the Christian worldview with the science and practice of contemporary behavioral sciences. The program aims to achieve a threefold integration of (a) spiritual and theological understandings; (b) clinical theory and practice; and (c) empirical research methodology. Programmatic emphasis on the use of empirical research in addressing bio-psycho-social-spiritual issues offers an innovative approach to understanding the experience and behavior of persons in an increasingly complex society. Such an integrated approach is of special interest to individuals who wish to enhance the Christian perspective with contemporary scientific methodology and clinical techniques of the helping professions. 

PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES
The student will be able to:

  1. Synthesize and apply a wide array of counseling theories from within an integrated Christian worldview.
  2. Evaluate and incorporate ethical and legal standards in the counseling field.
  3. Assess, diagnose, and treat clients with a broad array of presenting problems and mental disorders using multiple counseling skills.
  4. Appraise theories in all core curricular areas of counseling utilizing a biblical worldview and an awareness of industry best practices.
  5. Design, conduct and critically evaluate scientific research studies and translate them to clinical and applied settings.
  6. Evaluate child, adolescent and marriage and family clients in order to effectively determine a treatment in accordance with a distinctly biblical worldview and established best practices.
  7. Evaluate diverse individual, group and family populations within a developmental systems context in order to effectively determine appropriate treatments.

PROGRAM SPECIFIC ADMISSION PROCEDURES
In addition to the General Admission Procedures outlined in this catalog, doctoral applicants to the Counseling program must have:

  1. An earned master’s degree or its equivalent from an appropriately accredited seminary or graduate school in counseling or a related field.
  2. A cumulative GPA of at least 3.25 or above (on a 4.00 scale) in all previous graduate course work.
  3. MAT scores are preferred, but GRE General Test scores will be accepted.
  4. A TOEFL score with a minimum of 600 or 250 on the computer test (if applicable).
  5. Two Letters of Recommendation: One should be from a pastor and one from a professor or a clinical supervisor.  All should be obtained from individuals qualified to address the applicant’s ability to complete doctoral work, maturity, motivation, and ethics.
  6. A 300-word Letter of Intent specifying the applicant’s purpose and goals for entering the Ph.D. Program.
  7. A Professional Vita including degrees earned, ministry and/or counseling experience, and career goals.
  8. Demonstration of Writing Competency in proper APA format (latest edition). Applicants must respond to a case study describing the manner in which they would handle the case. The case study (vignette) is available online.
  9. A Graduate Status Record (available online).

The above are minimum academic requirements for admission to the Ph.D. in Counseling. The applicant’s character, integrity, and general fitness to practice a particular profession will also be considered in the admission process.

ADMISSIONS COMMITTEE
Once all of the admissions materials are received, the Graduate Admissions Office will send the student’s file to the Center for Counseling and Family Studies for the Ph.D. Admissions Committee to review. Admission to the program requires the approval of the Ph.D. Admissions Committee, who may also request additional actions prior to admittance, if deemed necessary (e.g., an admissions interview; additional writing sample, etc.).

NOTIFICATION OF ADMISSION
The Center for Counseling and Family Studies Ph.D. Admission Committee determines admission status within two weeks following the receipt of the completed Ph.D. application file. Official notification of admission, and of any conditions attached to that admission, is made in a letter sent to the applicant by the Ph.D. Admission Committee. Correspondence or notification from other sources does not constitute official notice of admission.

A student must be admitted at least 120 days prior to the start of an academic term in order for the admission to be effective for that term. If the admission process is completed after that deadline, whether because the file was not completed or because admissions action was not taken earlier, the admission will be effective for the following academic term.

TRANSFER OF CREDIT
Students may transfer up to 15 semester hours of Ph.D. coursework. For a transferred course to replace a Liberty University Ph.D. course, the following requirements must be met:

  1. The school at which the course was taken must be appropriately accredited;
  2. The course credit must be at least three semester hours or five quarter hours;
  3. The student must have earned a grade of B or better in the course; and
  4. The course must overlap one of Liberty’s courses by at least 80%.

Transfer credits must have been completed as post-master’s course work (700-900 level) within the previous five years to be accepted. Coursework cannot be transferred from a completed degree. Courses with a recorded grade of C or below will not be accepted. Correspondence studies or life experiences will not be accepted for transfer credit. Credits from a prior degree earned through Liberty University are considered transfer credits.


ADMISSION TO Ph.D. CANDIDACY
Students are admitted to candidacy upon recommendation of the Center for Counseling and Family Studies and successful completion of the following:

  1. The Core Curriculum
  2. The Ph.D. Qualifying  Examination
  3. Area of Concentration, Practicum and Internship
  4. The Ph.D. Candidacy Examination

If for any reason the student successfully completes the core curriculum, but is unable to complete the other requirements for candidacy, a Certificate of Advanced Graduate Studies will be awarded.

ADVISEMENT
Advisement is given regarding coursework, the Qualifying and Comprehensive Examinations, and other academic requirements by the core doctoral faculty and the appointed advisement staff.  Students needing advisement may e-mail the administrator (phdcounseling@liberty.edu) to be directed to the proper advisor. It is always the responsibility of the student to be aware of University policies and regulations and state licensing requirements affecting his or her program.


COURSE REQUIREMENTS
The Ph.D. requires completion of a minimum of 63 hours of post-master’s Ph.D. level coursework.  Students must complete 15 hours of qualifying coursework, beginning with COUC 740, pass The Qualifying Examination, complete the post Qualifying Examination core courses and electives, complete a practicum and internship, pass The Candidacy Examination, and complete dissertation related coursework and research. 

The Ph.D. Concentration in Professional Counseling (24 hours, including nine hours of clinical instruction) is distinctive in its integration of graduate-level studies in biblical exegesis and theological studies with the science and practice of contemporary behavioral sciences, clinical theory and practice, and empirical research methodology. These emphases are of special interest to professional practitioners who seek to address the total spectrum of issues for which persons seek professional therapy with the added training required to service clients seeking assistance in the area of spirituality. 

The Ph.D. Concentration in Pastoral Care and Counseling (24 hours, including nine hours of clinical instruction) is distinctive in its integration of the Christian worldview with the science and practice of contemporary behavioral sciences. The program functions in cooperation with Liberty Baptist Theological Seminary. 

Both concentrations aim to achieve a threefold integration of:

  1. Spiritual and theological understandings
  2. Clinical theory and practice
  3. Empirical research methodology.

Programmatic emphasis on the use of empirical research in addressing psycho-theological issues offers an innovative approach to a more complete understanding of the experience and behavior of persons in an increasingly complex society. Such an integrated approach is of special interest to individuals who wish to enhance the Christian perspective with contemporary scientific methodology and clinical techniques of the helping professions.

CLINICAL PREREQUISITES AND FOUNDATIONAL COMPETENCIES
The Ph.D. in Counseling requires that students demonstrate professional competence with transcript evidence of having the following graduate-level clinical prerequisites representing 27 hours:

  • Professional Identity, Function and Ethics (COUN 501)
  • Human Development (COUN 502)
  • Research and Statistics (COUN 503)
  • Techniques and the Helping Profession (COUN 505)
  • Counseling Theories (COUN 510)
  • Group Process (COUN 512)
  • Individual Appraisal (COUN 521)
  • Psychopathology (COUN 646)
  • Diagnosis and Treatment Planning (COUN 667)

The Foundational Competencies (9 hours) focus on theology.  It is imperative that students have proper theological instruction in order to integrate effectively.  Students must demonstrate transcript evidence of the following graduate-level courses:

  • Systematic Theology I (THEO 525)
  • Systematic Theology II (THEO 530)
  • Hermeneutics (NBST 652)

CLINICAL INSTRUCTION
Approved Practicum and Internship experiences are required for all students enrolled in the Concentration in Professional Counseling or the Concentration in Pastoral Care and Counseling. Both are planned in consultation with the Center’s Coordinator of Practicum and Internship.


EXAMINATIONS
All doctoral students in Counseling are required to take two examinations prior to proceeding into different stages of the doctoral experience.

After the completion of all Foundational Competencies and Qualifying Coursework, the student will be required to pass The Qualifying Exam. This exam builds upon knowledge gleaned from prerequisite courses and qualifying coursework.  Areas include: Integration, Theories and Clinical Practice, and Research and Statistics.  The Qualifying Examination is a proctored exam that can be taken without coming to campus. It consists of three essay questions that students are given a total of eight hours to complete. Students have two attempts to pass each of the three content areas. Once a student passes a content area they are not required to retake that portion if another area is failed.  Failure to pass this exam will lead to dismissal from the program.

The other exam students are required to pass is the Candidacy Examination. This exam is completed in conjunction with the Dissertation Chair and is designed to enable students to demonstrate that they have developed excellence in research methodology and readiness for dissertation research.


DISSERTATION
The dissertation is expected to represent the results of original and significant research written in a scholarly manner and worthy of publication. It is the culmination of the doctoral program.

The student’s dissertation committee (chair and two additional members) will guide him or her through the research process.  All members must meet the standards for appointment as graduate faculty.

Once students enter the dissertation phase of their degree, they must maintain continuous enrollment (Fall, Spring, and Summer semesters) until they complete all degree requirements. If they do not, they will break enrollment, and they will be required to apply for readmission if/when they wish to resume the pursuit of their degree. They will have to complete their degree under the Degree Completion Plan (DCP) in effect at the time of their readmission.


GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
To graduate, students in the Ph.D. program must:

  1. Pass the Qualifying Exam.
  2. Complete a minimum of 63 hours, with at least 48 hours completed through Liberty University.
  3. Complete the degree within 10 years.
  4. Complete their required curriculum with a cumulative GPA of 3.00 or better. Any coursework taken toward fulfilling the requirements of the Doctor of Philosophy degree or required by the student’s advisor or committee with a recorded grade below B will not count toward the degree and may result in dismissal from the program.
  5. Pass the Candidacy Examination.
  6. Successfully write and defend their dissertation research.
  7. Take the graduate writing assessment.
  8. Submit a Graduation Application to the Registrar’s Office (at the beginning of the final semester)

A student may petition the Center for Counseling and Family Studies for permission to retake one course in which he/she received a grade of C.  No further coursework can be completed until the grade of C is replaced on the student’s transcript. If a student receives a grade of C in any subsequent course he/she will be academically dismissed from the program. A grade of D or F in any course will result in dismissal from the program.


Program of Study

(Ph.D.) Doctor of Philosophy in Counseling (63 hrs) Professional Counseling Concentration
Program Option: Online Format
Clinical Prerequisites
Counselor Professional Identify, Function, and Ethics; Human Growth and Development; Research and Program Evaluation; Techniques and the Helping Profession; Theories of Counseling; Group Process; Individual Appraisal; Psychopathology and Counseling; Clinical Diagnosis and Treatment Planning
Foundational Competencies
Systematic Theology I; Systematic Theology II; Hermeneutics
Statistics Competency Exam
Core Courses (33 hrs)
COUC 715 Applied Counseling Theories 3*
COUC 730 Issues in Integration 3*
COUC 740 Advanced Research Design 3*
COUC 745 Intermediate Statistics and Quantitative Research 3*
Qualifying Examination
COUC 705 Philosophy of Religion and the Helping Professionals 1 3
COUC 710 Advanced Group Counseling 3
COUC 720 Family Development 3
COUC 735 Spirituality and Identity 3
COUC 815 Empirically Supported Treatments 3
COUN 800 Personality Testing 3
COUN 805 Advanced Psychopathology and its Treatment 3
Concentration Courses (18 hrs)
COUN Electives 9
COUN 998 Advanced Practicum 3
COUN 999 Internship in Counseling 6
Candidacy Examination
Dissertation 2
COUC 870 Quantitative Research and Advanced Statistics Seminar 3
OR
COUC 871 Advanced Qualitative Research Seminar 3
COUN 989 Dissertation Proposal and Research 3 6
COUN 990 Dissertation Defense 3
*Must be completed before taking the qualifying exam

May take an elective approved by the PhD Directors in place of COUC 705.

Once the student enters the Dissertation phase, he/she must maintain continuous enrollment until all degree requirements are completed.

COUN 989 must be taken a minimum of two times. Any student who is not ready for enrollment in COUN 990 after completing the second enrollment in COUN 989 may be required, as determined by the student’s dissertation chair, to repeat COUN 989 until deemed ready for enrollment in COUN 990.

(Ph.D.) Doctor of Philosophy in Counseling (63 hrs) Pastoral Care & Counseling Concentration
Program Options: Online Format
Clinical Prerequisites
Counselor Professional Identify, Function, and Ethics; Human Growth and Development; Research and Program Evaluation; Techniques and the Helping Profession; Theories of Counseling; Group Process; Individual Appraisal; Psychopathology and Counseling; Clinical Diagnosis and Treatment Planning
Foundational Competencies
Systematic Theology I; Systematic Theology II; Hermeneutics
Statistics Competency Exam
Core Courses (30 hrs)
COUC 715 Applied Counseling Theories 3*
COUC 730 Issues in Integration 3*
COUC 740 Advanced Research Design 3*
COUC 745 Intermediate Statistics and Quantitative Research 3*
Qualifying Examination
COUC 700 Theology and Counseling 3
COUC 705 Philosophy of Religion and the Helping Professionals 1 3
COUC 710 Advanced Group Counseling 3
COUC 720 Family Development 3
COUC 725 Counseling Religious Clients 3
COUC 735 Spirituality and Identity 3
Concentration Courses (21 hrs)
Electives 12
COUN 998 Advanced Practicum 3
COUN 999 Internship in Counseling 6
Candidacy Examination
Dissertation (12 hrs) 2
COUC 870 Quantitative Research and Advanced Statistics Seminar 3
OR
COUC 871 Advanced Qualitative Research Seminar 3
PACO 989 Dissertation Proposal and Research 3 6
PACO 990 Dissertation Defense 3
*Must be completed before taking the qualifying exam

May take an elective approved by the PhD Directors in place of COUC 705.

Once the student enters the Dissertation phase, he/she must maintain continuous enrollment until all degree requirements are completed.

PACO 989 must be taken a minimum of two times. Any student who is not ready for enrollment in PACO 990 after completing the second enrollment in PACO 989 may be required, as determined by the student’s dissertation chair, to repeat PACO 989 until deemed ready for enrollment in PACO 990.


DEGREE COMPLETION PLANS (DCP) AND COURSE DOCUMENTS
The Degree Completion Plans for the Ph.D. programs in Counseling are available online at http://www.liberty.edu/dcps and the Ph.D. documents and other important information are available online at http://www.liberty.edu /index.cfm?PID=673.


CERTIFICATE OF ADVANCED GRADUATE STUDIES
Liberty University offers the Certificate of Advanced Graduate Studies to those students who complete a course of study not linked to the pursuit of a degree and consisting of a coherent set of courses addressing a specific theme.  Students will be awarded a Certificate of Advanced Graduate Studies if they choose not to complete their dissertation or have failed their second attempt on the Qualifying Examination.  Students awarded a Certificate of Advanced Graduate Studies in Counseling must have: (a) been admitted to the Ph.D. program; (b) completed the Foundational Competencies and Core Courses; and (c) earned a GPA of 3.00 or better. The awarding of a Certificate of Advanced Graduate Studies will result in an appropriate notation on the student’s academic record.

Department of Health Professions

Beverly S. Mahoney, R.N., B.S., M.S., Ph.D., M.C.H.E.S., F.A.S.H.A., F.A.A.H.E.
Associate Dean, School of Health Sciences
Acting Chair,
Department of Health Professions
Professor of Health Professions


Richard Lane, B.S., M.P.H., M.D.
Director, Master of Public Health Program
Professor of Health Professions

RESIDENTIAL FACULTY
Professor
Florence, J.; Lane; Linstra; Mahoney

Associate Professor
Florence, A.; Henderson; Lennon; Pickard


Master of Public Health (M.P.H.)

PURPOSE
The Master of Public Health program is for individuals wishing to impact the world for Christ through the ministry of health. The degree can enhance the professional preparedness of a recent college graduate or the seasoned professional. Physicians, nurses, health educators, lawyers and social workers are among the many professionals who have benefitted by augmenting their knowledge and skill base with a MPH degree. 

PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES
The student will be able to:

  1. Design, develop, implement and evaluate strategies to improve individual and community health.
  2. Interact with diverse individuals and communities to produce an intended public health outcome.
  3. Create and communicate a shared vision for changing a public health outcome and propose solutions to organizational and community challenges.
  4. Recognize system level properties and how they affect relationships among individuals, groups, organizations, communities, and environments.
  5. Articulate and/or demonstrate the Christian worldview regarding ethical choices, values and professional practices in public health decisions.

Global Health Concentration

  • The student will be able to apply public and community health strategies in cross-cultural and global settings.

Health Promotion Concentration

  • The student will be able to assess, plan, implement, and evaluate health programming in community settings as well as administer health programs, serve as a resource person, and advocate for health and health education.

Nutrition Concentration

  • The student will be able to apply the principles of and incorporate best practices in human nutrition as they relate to public health, disease prevention and improved quality of life among various populations.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS
The Master of Public Health is a 42 hour program that offers three concentrations: Global Health, Health Promotion and Nutrition.  Students complete 18 core hours in five disciplines: biostatistics, epidemiology, environmental health sciences, health policy and management, and social and behavioral sciences. These classes are combined with 24 credit hours in one of three concentrations: Nutrition, Health Promotion, and Global Health.

PROGRAM SPECIFIC ADMISSION PROCEDURES
In addition to the general admission requirements, admission to candidacy in the Master of Public Health program requires:

  1. Earned baccalaureate degree or its equivalent from an institution accredited by an agency recognized by the U.S. Department of Education (e.g., SACS, TRACS, ABHE, etc.)
  2. An undergraduate cumulative GPA of 2.50 or above (on a 4.00 scale)
  3. Technology Questionnaire: Computer access and literacy for word processing, Internet, and e-mail are required for all graduate students. This form is available online.
  4. TOEFL (if applicable)

Students who do not meet all of the above requirements may be admitted on a provisional basis for nine hours of graduate coursework. Students who do not meet the minimum GPA requirement may be admitted on Academic Probation status; these students must take and pass GRST 500 – Introduction to Graduate Writing in their first semester. Students who have less than an undergraduate 2.00 GPA will not be admitted to the program.

TRANSFER CREDIT
Students may transfer up to nine (9) graduate credit hours from an accredited institution subject to department approval.  In order to transfer credit, students must have earned the minimum grade of B; and courses must have been completed within 10 years of the start date of the program.  Credits from a prior degree earned through Liberty University are considered transfer credits.


GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

  1. Satisfactory completion of 42 total hours.
  2. A minimum of 33 hours must be completed through Liberty University, not to include credits from a prior degree earned through Liberty.
  3. A maximum of nine (9) hours of transfer credit, including credit from a degree on the same academic level previously earned through Liberty, may be applied to the degree.
  4. Students must complete all courses with a 3.00 or higher cumulative grade point average.
  5. No more than two grades of “C” may be applied to the degree.
  6. No grades of “D” may be applied to the degree.
  7. Degree must be completed within five years.
  8. All Resident students are required to enroll in and pass GRST 500 in their first semester.
  9. All Online students admitted on Academic Probation are required to enroll in and pass GRST 500 in their first semester.
  10. Submit a Graduation Application to the Registrar’s Office at the beginning of the final semester.

Program of Study

(M.P.H.) Master of Public Health (42 hrs)
Program Options: Online and Resident Formats
Core Courses (18 hrs)
HLTH 501 Biostatistics 3
HLTH 503 Principles of Epidemiology 3
HLTH 505 Principles of Environmental Health 3
HLTH 507 Public Health Administration 3
HLTH 509 Social and Behavioral Theory Applications in Public Health 3
HLTH 511 Research Methods in Public Health 3
Concentration Courses (24 hrs)
Global Health Concentration
HLTH 620 Introduction to Global Health 3
HLTH 622 Primary Healthcare in Developing Countries 3
HLTH 623 Cultural Aspects of Health Behavior 3
HLTH 624 Sanitation in Developing Countries 3
HLTH 625 Prevention and Control of Infectious Diseases 3
HLTH 698 Practicum 3
Elective Courses 6*
Health Promotion Concentration
HLTH 630 Principles of Community Health 3
HLTH 632 Health Program Planning 3
HLTH 633 Health Program Evaluation 3
HLTH 634 Health Communication and Advocacy 3
HLTH 635 Health Agency Management 3
HLTH 698 Practicum 3
Elective Courses 6*
Nutrition Concentration
HLTH 640 Principles of Nutrition 3
HLTH 642 Food-borne Illness Prevention 3
HLTH 643 Nutrition and Chronic Disease 3
HLTH 644 Diabetes, Obesity and Eating Disorders 3
HLTH 645 Performance Nutrition for the Physically Active 3
HLTH 698 Practicum 3
Elective Courses 6*
*Approved electives include: BMAL 500, 501, BUSI 642; CLED 610; COMS 532; HLTH 550, 551, 552, 553, 554, 556, 656, 636, 637

DEGREE COMPLETION PLANS (DCP)
Degree Completion Plans for the Master of Public Health program are available online from the Registrar’s webpage at http://www.liberty.edu/dcps.


Department of Nursing

Deanna C. Britt, R.N., B.S.N., M.S.N., Ph.D.
Chair, Department of Nursing
Professor of Nursing


Sharon J. Kopis, R.N., B.S.N., M.S., Ed.D.
Director of Graduate Studies in Nursing
Associate Professor of Nursing

RESIDENTIAL FACULTY
Professor
Britt, Goodrich

Associate
Hall, Kopis, Sanders

Assistant
Little

DISTANCE LEARNING FACULTY
Assistant
Brickhill; Giese; Miller, L.; Salladay; Tasker


Master of Science in Nursing (M.S.N.)

PURPOSE
Liberty University’s Master of Science in Nursing program is founded on a Christian worldview and designed to prepare competent men and women in the field of nursing education and nursing administration. The program prepares students as nurse educators and faculty members in schools of nursing, and nurse administrators/leaders. Graduates are equipped with the critical thinking skills, leadership, and knowledge needed to promote the profession of nursing through clinical practice, teaching, research, program development and implementation, and scholarship

PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES
The student will be able to:

  1. Integrate research and scholarship into advanced nursing practice (AACN/CCNE I, IV, NLN 7, ANA-Admin. 10, 13, 15)
  2. Influence nursing practice by integrating policy criteria and advocacy skills (AACN/CCNE VI, NLN 8, ANA-Admin. 16)
  3. Employ quality improvement, safety standards, and outcomes management to support best practices in nursing (AACN/CCNE III, IX, NLN 6, ANA-Admin. 7)
  4. Collaborate with members of interprofessional teams to promote culturally competent population health care and clinical prevention in a variety of settings (AACN/CCNE VII, VIII, ANA-Admin 5b, 10, 11)
  5. Utilize innovative health care technologies in a variety of practice settings (AACN/CCNE V, NLN1, ANA-Admin. 14)
  6. Apply Christian Worldview and ethical decision making to Advanced Nursing Practice (LU mission, AACN/CCNE IX, NLN 6, ANA-Admin 12)
  7. Demonstrate leadership in a variety of professional practice and educational settings (AACN/CCNE II, IX, NLN 5, 8, ANA-Admin. 3, 15)

Nurse Educator Concentration

The student will be able to:

  1. Design nursing curricula that reflects student learning needs, innovative teaching strategies, assessment and evaluation of learning outcomes that support a positive learning environment (NLN competencies 3 and 4)
  2. Construct a learning environment based on educational theory and evidence based practice which promotes individual learner needs (NLN competency 1)
  3. Demonstrates the knowledge, skills, and abilities in creating a learning environment that supports individual goals and diverse student needs (NLN competency 2)

Nursing Administration Concentration

The student will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate consultation and collaboration with interdisciplinary teams to direct health care systems delivery of nursing services and professional practice (ANA-Admin. 5c, 11, 10)
  2. Provide health care systems management utilizing the nursing process* to perform strategic planning, fiscal and resource management and evaluation of outcomes (ANA-Admin. 1-6, 14)
  3. Utilize evidence to create a culture of safety and quality based on nursing values, advocacy, current nursing practice, legal ethical and regulatory compliance (ANA-Admin. 7, 8, 9, 12)

*Assessment, diagnosis/data analysis, outcomes identification, planning, implementation, and outcomes evaluation.


ACCREDITATION
The Master of Science in Nursing program is accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE).

CERTIFICATION
The Master of Science in Nursing – Nurse Educator Concentration may meet the educational requirements of the National League of Nursing’s Nurse Educator Certification. The Nurse Administrator concentration may meet the educational requirements of the American Nurse Credentialing Center’s Nurse Executive/ Nurse Executive Advanced Certification.

Note:  Certification and eligibility requirements are changed periodically by credentialing bodies and are out of the control of the academic institution.  Credentialing bodies such as the National League of Nursing and the American Nurse Credentialing Center make the final determination to sit for any exams they may offer.


PROGRAM SPECIFIC ADMISSION PROCEDURES
All policies and procedures for admission to graduate programs as stated in this Catalog apply unless otherwise stated.  The following criteria are established to encourage applications from qualified students who are highly motivated, self-directed, and academically competent to ensure selection of individuals who possess abilities that will enable them to successfully pursue graduate study in nursing.  Each applicant must submit documentation to the Office of Graduate Admissions [gradadmissions@liberty.edu] that addresses the following criteria:

  1. Graduate of a nationally accredited nursing program/school or its equivalent.  Accrediting bodies include: Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE).
  2. Bachelor of Science in Nursing (B.S.N.) or a bachelor’s degree in another discipline.  Non-B.S.N. applicants with an RN license may be admitted to the M.S.N. program but must satisfy requirements for the following undergraduate bridge courses: NURS 225, Research in Nursing; NURS 440, Strategies for Community Health; and NURS 490, Leadership/Management in Nursing.  Bridge courses are not a prerequisite to admission into the M.S.N. program, but must be completed within the first year of admission to the M.S.N. program. 
  3. Introductory statistics course (math preferred) and an undergraduate course in health assessment are required. For those who did not complete these courses in their undergraduate programs, they may fulfill these requirements during the first two semesters of the M.S.N. program and must complete the statistics course prior to enrollment in NURS 500, Research; the undergraduate course for health assessment must be fulfilled prior to enrollment in NURS 505, Advanced Health/Physical Assessment.
  4. Minimum cumulative undergraduate GPA of 3.00 on a scale of 4.00. 
  5. Nurses educated outside of the United States must submit the following documentation in order to be considered for admission:
    1. Proof of valid and current RN licensure based on review by the Commission on Graduates for Foreign Nursing Schools (CGFNS) International [+1(215) 222-8454)] (must hold a valid registered nurse license issued in one of the fifty University States.  See #6.)
    2. Pass the NCLEX Readiness Exam (offered by the CGFNS)
    3. Undergraduate transcript evaluation report from the World Education System (WES) or the National Association of Credential Evaluation Services (NACES). This evaluation is required to determine equivalency of the applicant’s nursing and baccalaureate degrees to nursing education programs offered by schools in the U.S.
    4. TOEFL Scores.

Note: TOEFL is not required for students who obtained a baccalaureate degree in the United States or Canada.

  1. Current registered nurse license in good standing without any sanctions or restrictions, actual or pending issued in one of the fifty United States.
  2. Current American Heart Association Basic Life Support Healthcare Provider CPR card.
  3. Must have one year of nursing practice as a registered nurse.
  4. All students must be fully admitted into the MSN program to enroll in classes or if special student status must be approved through the Nursing Department.
  5. Nurse Educator: NURS 617, 618, 619, 620 and Nurse Administrator: NURS 623, 624, 625, 626 require a practicum, which must be completed within the United States.

EVALUATION OF TRANSFER CREDITS
With approval from the Department of Nursing Graduate Faculty Committee, students may transfer up to two graduate-level courses (total of six credit hours) from an appropriately accredited institution.  In order to transfer credit hours, the student must have earned the minimum grade of B; the courses must have been completed within five years of the start date of the program.  Students may receive transfer credit for graduate courses that were required for another completed master’s degree.  No correspondence or life experience study will be accepted for credit in the M.S.N. program. Credits from a prior degree earned through Liberty University are considered transfer credits.


COURSE REQUIREMENTS
The Master of Science in Nursing offers nurse educator and nursing administratration concentrations. With faculty guidance students develop a program of study and practicum that reflects their nursing education or administrative interests. Full and part-time options are available. Each student should obtain an up-to-date copy of the Graduate Nursing Student Handbook (available online at Liberty University’s M.S.N. website), for information about matriculation and progression in the M.S.N. program. The application information and forms are also available online.

PHYSICAL EXAMINATION/INSURANCE PRACTICUM REQUIREMENTS
Documentation that verifies professional malpractice insurance, current American Heart Association CPR card status, current physical examination, drug screen, immunization status (i.e., measles, mumps and rubella (MMR), tuberculosis (TB) testing, Varicella titer or immunity, Hepatitis B), HIPAA and OSHA education verification and a Criminal Background Check must be submitted once students enroll in courses that include a practicum component. Additional requirements may be requested by the student-selected practicum facility sites. Students are responsible to assume all costs associated with practicum requirements.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

  1. Satisfactory completion of all course and clinical requirements (minimum grade of B); total of 42 credit hours with a 3.00 or higher cumulative grade point average.
  2. A minimum of 36 hours must be completed through Liberty University, not to include credits from a prior degree earned through Liberty.
  3. A maximum of six (6) hours of transfer credit, including credit from a degree on the same academic level previously earned through Liberty, may be applied to the degree.
  4. Course repeat policy applied to one course only. Students will have the option to repeat one course if they earn a grade of C. To successfully complete the program, students must earn a minimum grade of B for all graduate courses.
  5. Students who receive more than one C are automatically dropped from the program. Any D grade or below results in dismissal from program without option to repeat course.
  6. Degree must be completed within five years.
  7. All Online students admitted on Academic Probation are required to enroll in and pass GRST 500 in their first semester.
  8. Submit a Graduation Application to the Registrar’s Office at the beginning of the final semester.

Programs of Study

(M.S.N.) Master of Science in Nursing (42 hrs) Nurse Educator Concentration
Program Options: Online Format
Core Curriculum (15 hrs) 1
NURS 500 Research 3*
NURS 501 Health Policy/Ethics 3
NURS 502 Nursing Theory and Advanced Practice 3
NURS 503 Managing Population Health 3
NURS 521 Nursing Issues, Informatics and Technology 3
Advanced Practice Core (9 hrs)
NURS 504 Advanced Pharmacology 3
NURS 505 Advanced Health/Physical Assessment 2 3*
NURS 506 Advanced Physiology and Pathophysiology 3
Nurse Educator Concentration Courses (18 hrs)
EDUC 500 Advanced Educational Psychology 3
NURS 617 Advanced Clinical Applications for the Nurse Educator 3**
NURS 618 Nursing Education I: Teaching Strategies and Evaluation 3**
NURS 619 Nursing Education II: Curriculum Development 3**
NURS 620 Nursing Education III: Advanced Practicum 3**
Elective 3 3
*Introductory statistics course (math preferred) and an undergraduate course in health assessment are required. For those who did not complete these courses in their undergraduate programs, they may fulfill these requirements during the first two semesters of the M.S.N. program. Students must complete the statistics course prior to enrollment in NURS 500 and the health assessment prior to enrollment in NURS 505.
**NURS 617, 618, 619 & 620 involve practicum hours [Nurse Educator-200 hours]. Students must obtain a practicum site contract along with an approved MSN or doctorally prepared nurse educator preceptor. Students must also complete pre-practicum requirements prior to enrollment in any practicum course (available online at http://www.liberty.edu/index.cfm?pid=10516).

Students with RN license and bachelor’s degree in a discipline other than Nursing must take NURS 225, 440, and 490 within the first year of the program.

NURS 505 requires a faculty approved MSN prepared preceptor who will proctor the final head-to-toe physical exam.

Any 500-600 level graduate courses from the disciplines of Nursing, Education, Business, Accounting, Counseling, Human Services, Seminary, etc. Please note prerequisite requirements prior to enrollment in elective courses.

(M.S.N.) Master of Science in Nursing (42 hrs) Nurse Administration Concentration
Program Option: Online Format
Core Curriculum (15 hrs) 1
NURS 500 Research 2 3
NURS 501 Health Policy/Ethics 3
NURS 502 Nursing Theory and Advanced Practice 3
NURS 503 Managing Population Health 3
NURS 521 Nursing Issues, Informatics and Technology 3
Nurse Administration Concentration Courses (27 hrs)
NURS 523 Financial and Resource Management for Nurse Leaders 3
NURS 524 Systems Management and Leadership for Nurse Leaders 3
NURS 623 Nursing Administration I: THe Role of the Nurse Administrator 3*
NURS 624 Nursing Administration II: Organizational Leadership and Management 3*
NURS 625 Nursing Administration III: Management of Resources 3*
NURS 626 Nursing Administration IV: Nursing Administration Capstone 3*
BUSI 610 Organizational Design and Structure 3
BUSI 642 Contemporary Issues in Human Resource Management 3
Elective 3 3
*NURS 623, 624, 625 and 626 involve practicum hours [Nurse Administrator - 200 hours]. Students must obtain a preceptor site contract along with an approved MSN or doctorally prepared nurse leader preceptor. Students must also complete all pre-practicum requirements prior to enrollment in any practicum course.

Students with RN license and bachelor’s degree in a discipline other than Nursing must take NURS 225, 440, and 490 within the first year of the program.

Introductory statistics course (math preferred) and an undergraduate course in health assessment (e.g.-NURS 210) are required. For those who did not complete these courses in their undergraduate programs, they may fulfill these requirements during the first two semesters of the M.S.N. program. Students must complete the statistics course prior to enrollment in NURS 500.

Electives may include NURS 508, 509, 519, 520 or any 500-600 level graduate courses from the disciplines of Nursing, Accounting, Business, Counseling, Education, Human Services, Seminary, etc. Please note prerequisite requirements prior to enrollment in elective courses.

DEGREE COMPLETION PLANS (DCP)
Degree Completion Plans for the Master of Science in Nursing program are available online from the Registrar’s webpage at http://www.liberty.edu/dcps.



Highlighted text indicates a change from the official version of the catalog.