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Sounds of Liberty to perform at GOP pre-debate party

September 21, 2011 : Liberty University News Service

The Sounds of Liberty sing a cappella on the steps of Arthur S. DeMoss Learning Center at Liberty University on Wednesday, Sept. 21.

Liberty University’s Sounds of Liberty will be performing at a pre-debate party for the GOP presidential debate in Orlando, Fla., on Thursday, Sept. 22.

Liberty University, located in Lynchburg, Va., is the world’s largest Christian university. It has 12,560 students attending classes on its 6,500-acre residential campus and 61,594 students in its thriving online education program.

The debate is being hosted by Fox News and the Florida Republican Party; the pre-debate party is being sponsored by the Faith and Freedom Coalition. The nine GOP candidates for president will be attending, as well as other politicians and dignitaries.

Sounds of Liberty is Liberty’s premier traveling ministry team. The six vocalists and six-piece band will be performing seven numbers during the two-hour event, in between each candidate speaking. An estimated 3,000 will be in attendance. The team leaves Thursday morning.

Scott Bullman, Director of Ministry Teams at Liberty, said the group will be doing mostly upbeat worship songs. He said he is excited about this opportunity to gain national exposure for Liberty University.

Previously, the group’s largest performance was at the Restoring Honor Glenn Beck rally at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. last year, with an estimated 300,000 in attendance.

“It’s such an incredible opportunity to perform for presidential candidates and be able to represent Jesus Christ and Liberty University,” said lead singer, Lorenzo Jackson.

The group performs during the March for Life on the Mall in Washington every year.

They will be performing in the Sept. 28 convocation at Liberty, before Minnesota representative Michele Bachmann, a Republican presidential candidate, speaks.

The Sounds of Liberty has existed in different forms since the 1970s.