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NHCLC president Sam Rodriguez speaks at convocation

April 16, 2010 : Paul McLinden

The Rev. Sam Rodriguez, president of the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference (NHCLC) returned to Liberty University today to speak at convocation, which was also part of The Awakening 2010 conference being held on campus and at Thomas Road Baptist Church.

He was introduced by Chancellor Jerry Falwell, Jr. as "one of the most influential Hispanic Christians in North America."

Rodriguez's first visit to Liberty was in 2008, when Liberty forged a partnership with the NHCLC.

In his message today, Rodriguez renewed hope for America, giving an emphatic charge to students. Citing Joshua 1:6-90, he urged them to “Be strong and brave as you lead in the conquest. There are lives of promise waiting to be conquered … even in the midst of conflict.”

Despite our living in an age of conflict, there is hope, he assured them.

“Christ, the hope of glory… Hope by speaking and preaching and living the gospel.” And hope “that a generation will rise, committed to Christ, empowered by His Holy Spirit, grounded of His word, that will have the audacity to declare, ‘For the Spirit of the Lord has anointed this generation to bring the Good News to America and the world.’”

Rodriguez told students that we need anointed voices to rise for God.

“This generation will not be silent … for every devil that rises up against you there is a bigger God who will rise up for you.”

Rodriguez was part of a lineup of more than 50 leaders of faith-based and policy groups scheduled to speak at the two-day Awakening conference, which was sponsored by the Freedom Federation. Rodriguez led a breakout session titled "Latino in America: Demographics, Values and Messaging Room" and is scheduled to speak tonight on “Righteousness and Justice” at the event's Liberty and Justice Rally. Click here to watch the event live.
 


  • The NHCLC serves 16 million Hispanic born-again Christians in the United States and Puerto Rico across generational, country of origin, and denominational lines on issues that pertain to the family, immigration, economic mobility, education, political empowerment, social justice, and societal transformation.