Jan 26, 2010

Scott Brown wins Massachusetts election

by Katie Bell

In one fell swoop Republican Scott Brown took the Massachusetts special election on Jan. 19, replacing deceased Democrat Ted Kennedy.

With his victory, Brown became the first Republican United States Senator from Massachusetts in 31 years. Edward William Brooke III was the last Republican Senator from Massachusetts. Brooke left office on Jan. 3, 1979.

Running against Brown in the election was Martha Coakley of the Democratic Party and Joseph Kennedy of the Libertarian Party. Brown was the underdog in the election and his victory came as a surprise to many.

Brown’s election to the Senate is significant because it will break the Democratic Party’s 60-vote filibuster-proof majority in the Senate while health care reform legislation is in its final phases, according to Fox News.

Members of the GOP across America are rejoicing in his victory. Not only does he vow to vote against health care reform legislation but his beliefs guide how he votes on key issues. Brown feels that the federal government is too big, the government should have created jobs instead of passing the stimulus bill, taxes are too high and the government needs to cease its obscene spending, according to Brown’s Web site, www.brownforussenate.com. He also thinks a majority of the debt Americans are passing onto their children and grandchildren is immoral.

Furthermore, Brown believes that every American deserves quality health care but the government should not create a new federal insurance program to provide it. This would only serve to increase government control, according to Brown’s Web site.
“Scott Brown’s victory in Massachusetts will change the political landscape for 2010,” CNN Political Editor Mark Preston said, according to CNN.

The race for this one Senate seat has significant ramifications for the political climate across America. Voters are tired of the status quo and are letting their voices be heard.

“Seeing the results and numbers come in from the election was astonishing. Growing up surrounded almost entirely by Democrats, I never expected a Republican to take Ted Kennedy’s Senate seat,” Liberty senior Nicole Palowskis of Rochdale, Mass. said.

What is really unique about this election is that Brown won the election by gaining the support of Massachusetts’ independent voters.

“If we don’t figure out a way to talk to independent voters, we are done,” a high-level democratic staffer who wished to remain anonymous said, according to CNN.

There is some fear that Democrats will try to pass health care reform legislation prior to Brown’s swearing in. However, Democratic Senator Jim Webb from Virginia was the first to make the request of his fellow democratic senators to suspend all votes on the health care bill. Webb cautioned that it was immoral to pass a bill through Congress prior to Brown taking office, according to CNN.

Not only is it immoral, it is political suicide for the Democratic party if they attempt to pull off such a stunt.

“In many ways, the campaign in Massachusetts became a referendum not only on health care reform but also on the openness and integrity of our government process,” Webb said according to CNN.

From this election, it is clear that large portions of the American people are fed up with President Barack Obama’s domestic policy regarding health care reform. Brown’s election proved to be a significant blow to Obama’s agenda. It is ironic that President Obama faces such a devastating political loss, considering a year ago he convinced many Americans that he was invincible.

Upon announcing his candidacy on Sept. 12, 2009, Brown made the claim, “Power in the hands of one political party, as it is here in Massachusetts, leads to bad government and poor decisions.”
With Brown’s election, the scales of power have finally begun to balance out in Washington. If Brown sticks by his beliefs, he will prove to be a voice of reason against universal health care and outlandish government spending. The recent transition of the Massachusetts Senate seat finally provides Americans with political change worth believing in.

Contact Katie Bell at
kebell2@liberty.edu.
 


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