Mar 31, 2009

Media Hope

by Caroline Harrison

In a society where social networking is as easy as the click of a mouse, the School of Communication plans to stay on the cutting edge with the launch of an avant-garde Web site called Mediahope.com in mid to late April.

“The purpose of Mediahope.com is twofold. First, to provide an outlet for news and opinions of those desiring to change our media, and the second is to initiate a unique strategy, putting the School of Communication on the cutting edge of journalism, e-commerce and new media as practiced at the university level,” Communications Professor Dr.Stuart Schwartz said.

Mediahope.com will host the blogs Media-ocrity and Campus Culture. Campus Culture is educationally focused, and the
Chair of the English and Modern Languages Department Dr. Karen Prior will be the administrator.

Media-ocrity will focus on a variety of public mediums, such as the news media industry and Hollywood. Dr. Schwartz will serve as administrator for the blog. Students will be able to subscribe to these blogs and are encouraged to read and comment.

Students can become members of the Media Hope Web site free of charge. Members will receive benefits such as discounts at participating coffee shops.

Mediahope.com has been under development for a year. Work on the actual Web site began in October 2008. The Web site will feature a clean modern design and progressive content,according to Edwards.

The site is Liberty affiliated.Mediahope.com received outside
support to get started and will generate revenue through advertising networks operated by Google, Amazon, and other companies, and attracting support from individuals and foundations, according to Edwards.

Contact Caroline Harrison at
ctharrison@liberty.edu. 


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