Tuesday, September 23, 2014

Candidates Field Questions

  • Published: April 29th, 2014

Keith Anderson

Keith Anderson, a 15-year U.S. Army veteran, former Lynchburg City School Board member and current dean of students at Liberty University, announced his bid to run as an independent for Lynchburg City Council Tuesday, Feb. 25.

In his position as a dean, Anderson currently provides oversight to Student Care, Student Conduct, Commuter Services and the Campus Pastors Office. In addition to these roles, Anderson also serves as the chief judicial officer and director of Counseling and Spiritual Support Offices.

Anderson

Keith Anderson

Anderson graduated from public school in Memphis, Tenn., and went on to pursue his bachelor’s degree at the University of Memphis. He obtained a Bachelor of Science in biblical studies from Andersonville Theological Seminary in Camilla, Ga. He continued his education at Liberty Baptist Theological Seminary, where he graduated with a master of arts in religion and a master’s in religious education.

In addition to his career as a military officer, Anderson also served as the senior pastor of Eighth Street Baptist Church and as the founder and CEO of HiliFavrd Ministries, a nonprofit mission organization.

According to his campaign website, Anderson has been married for 23 years, and the couple’s son, Nicholas, is 16 years old.

Anderson, 43, recently announced his enthusiasm for continuing to serve the Lynchburg community. After losing his 17-year-old daughter Stacia in a car accident in 2012, Anderson now recognizes the impact the community had on his family throughout their highs and lows.

“I arrived here in 2003 and have fallen in love with this city and with the people,” Anderson said in an interview with News & Advance. “I’ve had some very difficult times with the tragic death of my daughter two years ago, but … the city has wrapped its arms around me. In return, I want to continue to love it back and to serve.”

Q: How would you define the relationship between the city and the local colleges?

A: Civic engagement has been a recent push for institutions of higher learning all across America. College students should have the opportunity to exercise their voting rights wherever they have residency. Because of the influence that college students who are registered voters have had on local races, the relationship between the local colleges and city government has improved over recent years.

Q: What key city projects do you plan to focus on if elected?

A: Promoting economic growth within our city limits would be my first project when elected to city council. Creating policies and zoning ordinances that promote small business opportunity, is essential to generate a stable local economy. Secondly, promoting excellence in education while maintaining fiscal responsibility is important for the workforce readiness initiative I would champion to reduce unemployment for our area.

Q: Why is it important for students to vote locally, rather than focus on voting in their hometown?

A: It is imperative that students vote locally. The issues that students are encountering as residents of Lynchburg impact them directly and/or indirectly. As a commuting population, students are directly impacted by city ordinances and council decisions. Indirectly, students are impacted by their respective institutions’ ability to expand and offer better academic options.

Additionally, I think it is a mistake that many people think college students should not vote locally. This mindset is a mistake because many see college students as a burden to the local resources or merely as revenue streams without regard to students’ needs as residents of the local community. In fact, I believe that the local community should take the opportunity to retain some of the brightest minds that this country has to offer and to promote the opportunity for them to impact our city for a global position of leadership.

Q: What role do you believe the city government should play in our city?

A: The role of city government is to provide for basic services of all residents within the city limits. It is also the responsibility of the local government to carry out the day-to-day responsibility of delivering the goods and services of its citizens while maintaining efficiency and fiscal responsibility. It is also the responsibility of elected officials to provide leadership in developing partnerships and coalitions between stakeholders throughout the municipality.

Q: How do you plan to evenly allocate the annual budget in order to best serve the city?

A: When elected to City Council, I will appropriate funds within the city’s budget according to the priorities set forth by the adopted strategic plan. Those services that aid in supplying the basic needs of our city residents, investments into developing economic growth and infrastructure would receive the highest priority. Finally, the services that aid our quality of life and make our city attractive for recruitment would also be of importance.

Q: Why should a college student vote for you?

A: I am asking for the vote of all registered voters of Lynchburg, but I am the one candidate who understands the needs of the city and is empathetic to what the concerns are for college students, now and for their future.

Q: What has prepared you to be on the City Council?

A: I have been prepared for the role of City Council by my faith and family. I am prepared to continue serving the Lynchburg community with care and integrity. I have also been prepared through my 15-year military service to protect the voice of our citizens by leading in a way that represents their rights and values. Professionally, as an educator and administrator, I have been prepared to make wise and timely decisions that reflect the vision and mission of both large and small organization. My roles as both director and board member of non profit organizations have prepared me to take limited resources, a volunteer workforce, and seeming insuperable issues and ultimately achieving stated goals.

Hunsdon Cary, III

Hunsdon Cary, III, also known as H. Cary, is running in hopes of securing a second term as a Lynchburg City Council representative.

Cary, originally from Sandusky, Ohio, served as a captain in the Medical Service Corps of the U.S. Air Force from 1971 to 1975. He later moved to Lynchburg and began working for Westminster Canterbury in 1976. Cary assumed the position of president and CEO in 1985 and held the title until retiring in 2010, when he successfully ran for Lynchburg City Council.

Hunsdon Cary, III

Hunsdon Cary, III

According to Cary, his experience in the military and business realms has prepared him well to serve as a City Council representative. In addition to his time at Westminster Canterbury, Cary has also worked for a proprietary hospital corporation and served on the boards of various local nonprofit organizations.

Some of his goals include reducing the Lynchburg meals tax and promoting participation in Lynchburg’s volunteer programs.

According to Cary, communication between Lynchburg City Council and local colleges such as Liberty University has grown since his 2010 election. If re-elected, he hopes to continue that trend.

“As long as the city continues to view colleges as a resource rather than a burden, there is no limit to what the two can accomplish,” Cary said.

Cary also encouraged students who attend college in Lynchburg to get involved in the political process, even if they are not originally from the city.

“For some college students, it may feel like embracing your college town means rejecting your hometown,” Cary said. “Nothing could be further from the truth. We are glad you have chosen Lynchburg as your home for four years, and we hope you decide to stay.”

Q: How would you define the relationship between the city and the local colleges?

A: Any good relationship takes work. We’ve been working on ours since I joined City Council four years ago.
In 2011, representatives from the city and its local colleges began holding regular Town and Gown sessions to share thoughts and concerns about the future. “Let us consider how to stir up one another to love and good works, not neglecting to meet together, as is the habit of some, but encouraging one another,” (Hebrews 10:24-25). Our communication has improved markedly. More importantly, we have seen results.
The city recently approved institutional zoning for Liberty. The new designation means your school can continue to grow responsibility without spending time and resources lobbying City Council for permission to realize your potential. Now, Liberty only needs city approval for new construction that will impact traffic off campus. It was the right decision, and I supported it.
As long as the city continues to view colleges as a resource rather than a burden, there is no limit to what the two can accomplish.

Q: What key city projects do you plan to focus on if elected?

A: Lynchburg’s meals tax is one of the highest in Virginia. If re-elected, I will focus on reducing that tax. Our neighbors should be excited to visit Lynchburg’s great local restaurants! I think we can improve their bottom line and make the dining experience more affordable.
I also think it is important that we get to know our neighbors. That means encouraging opportunities that bring students and long-time residents together. In the next four years, I’ll be pushing for greater involvement in the kind of volunteer programs that bring us all together, like Friday Cheers at Riverfront Park.

Q: Why is it important for students to vote locally, rather than focus on voting in their hometown?

A: For some college students, it may feel like embracing your college town means rejecting your hometown. Nothing could be further from the truth. We are glad you have chosen Lynchburg as your home for four years, and we hope you decide to stay. If you are heart-set on returning to your hometown, we understand that, too.
Here is the bottom line: not all college students reside in Lynchburg year-round, but they are here for at least nine months of the year. If you complete school in four years, you will be here for 36 of 48 months. It is so easy to change your registration now. It just makes sense. You can always change back later.
I think it is important for students to be engaged in local affairs. It gives a perspective you may not have otherwise. Hopefully your involvement will carry over to your next hometown whether that’s Lynchburg or not. You get out of life what you put into it, and civic involvement is an essential part of the democratic process!

Q: What role do you believe the city government should play in our city?

A: City Council has a comprehensive plan that outlines the goals and objectives for Lynchburg for the next 20 years. You can view it on the city website: lynchburgva.gov. Local government should see to it that citizens are safe (police and fire), have access to proper utilities, have roads and streets that are well maintained and can rely on necessary capital improvements.

Q: How do you plan to evenly allocate the annual budget in order to best serve the city?

A: The proposed city budget for FY2015 is also available on the city website. City services are funded and available to all citizens/property owners in an equitable manner. No area or neighborhood is favored over another and that is how it should stay.

Q: Why should a college student vote for you?

A: More specifically, why should a Liberty student vote for me? I championed the pedestrian bridge over Wards Road when the City wanted an “at grade crossing” and I supported the Institutional Zoning change (discussed above) that has allowed Liberty to initiate so many projects on campus without having to jump through unnecessary hoops with the city.

Q: What has prepared you to be on the City Council?

A: In addition to my last four years as a member of City Council, I served my country as a captain in the United States Air Force Medical Service Corps during the Vietnam era and worked for a proprietary hospital corporation before becoming president and CEO of Westminster Canterbury, a 500-resident, continuing-retirement community with a $25 million budget. My business experience and service on a variety of local non profit boards prepared me well for becoming a member of City Council in 2010, and it continues to serve me well today.

Joan Foster

Joan Foster, the first female mayor of the City of Lynchburg from 2006-2012, currently serves on the Lynchburg City Council as an at-large member and is running for re-election May 6.

“There’s just, I feel, some unfinished business yet,” Foster said at an event where she announced her run for re-election. “So, I want to be part of that momentum that continues to propel Lynchburg forward.”

Joan Foster

Joan Foster

Foster is a supporter of Lynchburg’s Economic Development Authority, whose goal is to create more jobs in Lynchburg, according to her website. She values investment in downtown Lynchburg and the businesses that create jobs for Lynchburg.

During her term as mayor, Foster began the Mayor’s Book Club, a program focused on helping get books to children who cannot afford them. She is currently the director of development for Lynchburg Beacon of Hope, an organization that strives to inspire public school children to obtain a post-secondary education, the City of Lynchburg’s website states.

According to her website, Foster is known as a “bridge builder” for her efforts to build relationships between Lynchburg citizens. She is known for creating open dialogues for citizens to learn how to cultivate relationships and reduce racism within Central Virginia, according to her website.

A graduate of Lynchburg College with three degrees in elementary and early childhood education and special education, Foster has lived in Lynchburg with her husband for 13 years, according to her website. She and her husband have three children and three grandchildren. She attends St. John’s Episcopal Church and is a part of the outreach and newcomers committee. During her free time, she enjoys antiquing and spending time traveling with her family.

Q: How would you define the relationship between the city and the local colleges?

A: In 2010, as mayor of the City of Lynchburg, I recognized that there was a need to build stronger relationships with the area colleges and universities. In response to this need, Councilman Randy Nelson and I began the Town and Gown initiative. Throughout the year, city officials and presidents from all six area colleges meet quarterly to discuss achievements, challenges and upcoming projects.

Q: What key city projects do you plan to focus on if elected?

A: If elected, I plan to continue to focus on the necessary infrastructure and capital projects currently underway in the city. We have a new Heritage High School to build that has a total cost of approximately $80 million, as well as a renovation project to the football facilities at City Stadium that will cost $7 million. We can do both projects without raising taxes. We have more work to do downtown, including Combined Sewer Overflow (CSO) projects and the completion of the Lower Bluffwalk project.

Q: Why is it important for students to vote locally, rather than focus on voting in their hometown?

A: I support whatever the student decides is best for them. They have two choices: one, they can register and vote locally or two, they may continue to vote in their hometown through absentee ballot while they are in college. The important factor is that an individual should become an informed voter and vote at the local, state and national levels.

Q: What role do you believe the city government should play in our city?

A: As your at-large representative, my priorities are to advocate for excellence in education for all our children, to create an environment where businesses will grow and prosper and to champion a superior quality of life where our citizens feel safe and respected while having an enjoyable place to live and raise a family.

Q: How do you plan to evenly allocate the annual budget in order to best serve the city?

A: Each year from March until May, council members, along with the city manager and the city’s leadership team, review the city’s budget to ensure that we maintain an appropriate balance of funds so that we can continue to provide excellent core services to our citizens. Some of the services that are funded by general revenue dollars are public safety, public works, health and welfare, parks and recreation and community development. We have other funds that we review annually, like water, sewer, storm water, fleet and capital. We also offer citizen engagement sessions and a public hearing to receive citizen feedback on the proposed budget. My decisions are guided by the feedback from our citizens and our city’s foundational principal: “Good Governance and Fiscal Responsibility are the foundation to achieving Council’s vision of making Lynchburg ‘A Great Place to Live, Work, And Play.’”

Q: Why should a college student vote for you?

A: As your at-large City Council member, I will be available and open to all citizens that I represent in our city, including our local colleges and universities. I have great respect for the students, staff, faculty and administrators of our local colleges and universities. They are a vital part of our community. I look forward to continuing to work alongside our college population to move Lynchburg forward in the next four years.

Q: What has prepared you to be on the City Council?

A: In 2002, I was elected by Lynchburg voters to serve as their at-large representative on council and I am in my 12th year of service.. I served as vice-mayor for two years, and in 2006 I was appointed mayor of Lynchburg and served six years in this office. During my time on council, I supported or began the following initiatives: Talks on Race and Racism, The Amazing Books Race and the Mayor’s Reading Club, and Random Acts of Kindness. In February of 2012, I challenged the community to lose 12 tons in 2012 through the City’s Live Healthy Lynchburg challenge. I am happy to report that the residents of Central Virginia shed 12 tons in just six months.

Randy Nelson

Randy Nelson is running for re-election to the Lynchburg City Council. Nelson was appointed to the Lynchburg City Council in January 2010 and was elected to a full term as an at-large member in May of the same year.

Nelson has been a resident of Lynchburg for 62 years and is a graduate of E.C. Glass High School. He earned a bachelor’s degree from Randolph-Macon College and holds a law degree from the T.C. Williams School of Law at the University of Richmond, according to his campaign website.

Randy Nelson

Randy Nelson

According to Nelson’s website, he is a member of both the Lynchburg and Virginia State Bar Associations and has been practicing law for 38 years. During his law career, Randy Nelson served as legal counsel to (several) of the area colleges, representing the interests of individual students, faculty and administrators. He was also recognized by the Chief Justice of the Virginia Supreme Court and the Virginia State Bar for “extraordinary public service” to the court and citizens of Virginia in 2005.

In addition to his experience with the city council and his work as a lawyer, Nelson has been involved in several civic organizations in the area, including Lynchburg Life Saving Crew, Lynchburg Historical Foundation, Interfaith Outreach and Lynchburg Community Loan Fund, according to his website.

“(My) experiences enable me to appreciate the concerns of Central Virginia and make decisions through patient listening, careful observation, critical analysis and objective decision-making,” he said.

Nelson is married to Karen Nelson, an elementary school principal at a city School, and they have four grown children.

For more information on Randy Nelson, visit nelsonforcitycouncil.com.

Q: How would you define the relationship between the city and the local colleges?

A: Council member Foster and I organized the Town and Gown Committee in November 2010 in order to develop more collaborative and open relationships between and among the six area college presidents, all council members and city and school division leaders. For the past three years, we have regularly met over breakfast or lunch on each of the six college campuses and in City Hall to share concerns and successes. Consequently, collegiality is excellent.

Q: What key city projects do you plan to focus on if elected?

A: Capital projects will focus on constructing Heritage High School, the Odd Fellows Road intersection with Rt.29/460/Liberty University’s connector roads, completion of the Downtown Pedestrian/Retail corridor above the Riverfront Park, the Cross-Town Connector, the first phase of the City Stadium renovations, Ward’s Ferry Road and Harvard Street renovations and finalizing installation of utility lines and facilities along Fifth Street.

Q: Why is it important for students to vote locally, rather than focus on voting in their hometown?

A: Students’ priorities will differ. Those intending to return to their former home may prefer to maintain ties to their home community to enhance their post-graduation opportunities and qualities of life. Those intending to remain and settle in Central Virginia have good reasons to be involved in issues affecting their post-graduate community in Central Virginia.

Q: What role do you believe the city government should play in our city?

A: The city has the constitutional responsibility to implement and fulfill the state’s laws and policies to provide services to the citizens within the city. The city has no authority except that authorized and enabled by the laws of Virginia.

Q: How do you plan to evenly allocate the annual budget in order to best serve the city?

A: Budgets do not allocate assets evenly. General taxes generate revenues that pay for basic services as required by state law. User fees, such as water, storm-water, utility, lodging, trash, airport, etc., are applied to finance the specific activity that generates that fee, and those fees are not mixed with the general tax revenues. Capital projects are generally funded by revenues from the sale of municipal bonds, and those bond revenues cannot be used for operational purposes and only for a capital project for which the bond is issued. Grant funding is received and only used for the specific purpose of the grant. Rigid accounting guidelines are followed to ensure these procedures are followed, and Lynchburg maintains a AA+ bond rating and ranks as one of the best-run cities in this nation.

Q: Why should a college student vote for you?

A: I have served as legal counsel for several of the six city colleges, instructed college courses in three of our city’s colleges, served as legal counsel for the interests of individual students, faculty and administrators from all six city colleges, and been head coach of a Division I varsity college soccer program, my father was a college professor for 42 years, all four of my children are college graduates, and I work closely with our city’s college administrators. I am a board member of my own college’s alumni society and I am a newly appointed member of the Board of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC), which is the organization that measures accreditation of colleges in the south, including all accredited colleges in Virginia. For these and other reasons, I think I understand the needs and concerns of college students, the faculty and administrators of our city’s colleges.

Q: What has prepared you to be on the City Council?

A: I have been a resident of Lynchburg for 62 years, practiced law in Lynchburg for 38 years, represented persons and businesses from every Lynchburg neighborhood and demographic group, appeared before every court and governmental body in Central Virginia, worked closely with city departments and staff for 38 years, voluntarily served as a leader of a multitude of civic and nonprofit organizations, have been recognized by the Supreme Court of Virginia, Virginia State Bar, Virginia Legal Aid Society and City of Lynchburg for exceptional service to that court, to the Virginia State Bar, to the Commonwealth and to this city. I was a police officer, coached and officiated college and high-school-age soccer teams for more than 30 years, and served as a special justice presiding over judicial commitment hearings for 28 years. These experiences enable me to appreciate the concerns of Central Virginia and make decisions through patient listening, careful observation, critical analysis and objective decision-making.

Rhonnie Smith

After 43 years in business, Rhonnie Smith is making his first run for elected office. He and his wife of more than 50 years, Doris Smith, moved to Lynchburg in 2002, and Smith served as president of B&W’s Technical Services Division before retiring seven years ago, according to his website.

Rhonnie Smith

Rhonnie Smith

Throughout his retirement, Smith spent more than 10 percent of his time consulting local businesses in an effort to improve their effectiveness and efficiency, according to his website. He and his wife have also volunteered in local campaigns and have been active members of local political organizations.

In addition to assisting local businesses and remaining politically active throughout his retirement, Smith has helped organizations that reach the less fortunate, according to his website. He and his wife are involved in several local outreach programs. Among various acts of philanthropy, Rhonnie and Doris Smith host an Easter party for inner-city children through All Nations Church, hand out

Christmas presents in the community and help local Delegate T. Scott Garrett collect school supplies.

According to his website, if elected to City Council, Smith hopes to use his experience in business to develop a better environment for job creation and to increase opportunities for businesses and families.

Rhonnie and Doris Smith’s move to Lynchburg was the 18th move of their marriage. The two decided that Central Virginia was the place to spend the next chapter of their lives, according to his website.

For more information about Smith, visit voterhonnie.com.

Q: How would you define the relationship between the city and the local colleges?

A: I believe that the relationship between the city and local colleges is improving but is not as good as it could be. As a member of City Council, I will work directly with the student population at local colleges and universities by encouraging student involvement in the city of Lynchburg. I believe that the colleges and universities right here in Lynchburg are some of the finest in the country, and it is imperative that Lynchburg City Council recognizes this and supports these schools by having a strong, direct relationship with students who belong to the college communities.

Q: What key city projects do you plan to focus on if elected?

A: Economic Development to grow jobs here in Lynchburg as well as more activities for our younger population.

Q: Why is it important for students to vote locally, rather than focus on voting in their hometown?
A: While students are living here in Lynchburg, they are directly affected by Lynchburg’s statutes and taxes. The Lynchburg City Council sets the local taxes in Lynchburg, such as the meals tax. This has an impact on students’ bank accounts every time they eat out. It is important for them to be aware of local issues like this because their vote can make a difference in whether or not taxes are raised or lowered. Even better, it’s very easy to change your registration.

Q: What role do you believe the city government should play in our city?

A: Quite simply, I believe that, as in any government, local government’s role should be as small as possible so as to allow for more growth from the private sector.

Q: How do you plan to evenly allocate the annual budget in order to best serve the city?

A: The city manager puts the annual budget together. The City Council then approves the budget. When I am on City Council, I will make sure that the city budget is financially feasible and responsible so as to not force a higher tax burden on the population of Lynchburg.

Q: Why should a college student vote for you?

A: I have always been a strong champion of college students. They hold a very special place in my heart. In fact, I mentor quite a few of them right here in Lynchburg. College students should vote for me because I know how hard it is for them to live in Lynchburg’s stagnant economy. I believe the meals tax here in Lynchburg is far too high at 11.8 percent. When I am elected to City Council, I will focus on the meals tax and help make it more reasonable for students to eat out in Lynchburg. Students need to understand that I am deeply invested in their lives, and I promise to help make Lynchburg a better place for them to live, work and play.

Q: What has prepared you to be on the City Council?

A: My 43 years of business experience has prepared me to be on the Lynchburg City Council. I have served on multiple boards that have budgets that are much greater than that of the City of Lynchburg. I know how to allocate money and keep a balanced budget. Lynchburg desperately needs the perspective of a business executive on City Council. When I am elected to Lynchburg City Council, I will bring my experience as a business executive to City Council to better serve the City of Lynchburg.

Treney Tweedy

Treney Tweedy is running for a seat in the Lynchburg City Council, and according to her campaign website, if elected, she will be the fourth woman and first black woman to serve on the council.

Tweedy, a Lynchburg native, attended E.C. Glass High School before becoming a journalist for the U.S. Navy. When she returned to Lynchburg, she enrolled in Lynchburg College, where she received a bachelor’s degree in English.

Treney Tweedy

Treney Tweedy

Since then, Tweedy has become increasingly involved with the City of Lynchburg. According to her website, she holds a position as community development manager with Goodwill Industries of the Valleys and has represented District 3 on the Lynchburg City School Board since 2008. She has also served as the vice chairman of the Lynchburg City School Board for two years.

“I have sat through a total of 15 years of city and school division budget cycles either as a Lynchburg City School employee or as a member of the Lynchburg City School Board,” Tweedy stated on her website. “I understand the impact of maintaining a strong and viable public education system, which impacts economic development.”

Tweedy said she has a strong Baptist faith and because of this has dedicated her life to helping others.

Tweedy also explained that she believes Lynchburg is a city of opportunity and creativity.

“I believe Lynchburg has an awesome ‘Quality of Life,’ unparalleled in our region, because of the great recreational and artistic opportunities available in our city,” Tweedy wrote.
Tweedy is a member of Lynchburg Alumnae Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. and serves on the Step with Links Board.

According to her website, Tweedy has three children and one grandson and has resided in Lynchburg for the past 23 years.

Q: How would you define the relationship between the city and the local colleges?

A: The city initiated successful Town and Gown meetings with presidents of the local colleges. When elected, I am committed to expanding that initiative. City and college leadership working arm-in-arm ensure high schools are preparing students for college-level work and ensure we have jobs for students working through college and for their careers following graduation.

Q: What key city projects do you plan to focus on if elected?

A: As vice chairman of the Lynchburg City School Board, I will focus on the Heritage High School Project to its completion, the resurgence of Historic Downtown Lynchburg, the Academy of Fine Arts and the Riverfront projects.
Finally, my prioritized goal is to make Lynchburg a home to the creative class of young entrepreneurs. We want you to start businesses here and start your careers in Lynchburg. That requires opportunity, and, when elected, my job would be to work with you to make that happen.

Q: Why is it important for students to vote locally, rather than focus on voting in their hometown?

A: Local government is the closest level of government to the people. You have the choice. If your hometown is another city and you plan to return after graduation, hometown voting might make sense. However, if Lynchburg is your home for the next four years (hopefully more), I am happy to work with you and for you as your council member. It is important that we protect the rights of all voters to participate in the election process. More importantly, vote where you can talk to your elected officials and have a dialogue. I am asking for your vote.

Q: What role do you believe the city government should play in our city?

A: City government should be a major player. City government is true government for the people, by the people. The city educates, protects and serves. City government has less-exciting obligations to meet, like collecting trash, fixing roads and providing water/sewer services, but they are needed services. Our city must play an active role in protecting and improving the quality of life so it is attractive to businesses that hire people of creative backgrounds — the job creators of tomorrow.

Q: How do you plan to evenly allocate the annual budget in order to best serve the city?

A: In an ideal world, city departments would be treated equally/fairly, but in the real world, resources are scarce. Prioritizing is key. My priorities are public safety, public education and maintaining an adequate infrastructure road/highway system. These, along with an active economic development plan and job creation, should get top priority in any budget.
In traditional city government, evenly allocating is a zero-sum budget. It is not the best of all worlds. A zero-sum budget means that in order for someone to gain, someone else loses. Different parts of the city conflict with others and no one walks away happy. Managing things that way, we have failed. Budgeting should not be zero-sum, but win-win. Through effective economic development and fiscal responsibility, we grow all parts of the budget and positively impact all parts of the city together.

Q: Why should a college student vote for you?

A: When elected, my primary focus and campaign goal is to help you graduate into a good paying job or to help you create your own business. I will be your partner for progress. Together, we can ensure Lynchburg has the employers, the jobs and the assistance to make sure your transition from student to professional is a smooth one.
The unemployment rate for college graduates is three times the unemployment rate for others. Among those who find jobs, the number of college graduates working minimum wage jobs is at record levels — 71 percent higher than a decade ago. Meanwhile, graduates have a record amount of student loan debt, nationally totaling more than $1 trillion.
My commitment — to make your dreams come true in my hometown.

Q: What has prepared you to be on the City Council?

A: My life and career is a picture of servitude to my city and my country. I grew up here, graduated from E. C. Glass High School, served in the U. S. Navy, and then graduated from Lynchburg College. My sorority, Delta Sigma Theta, is built on a foundation of public service. I’m in my sixth year of service on the Lynchburg City School Board and second year as vice chairman.
My Baptist faith calls me to help others. I’m the community development manager with Goodwill Industries and I serve on the Step with Links Board. I served on the Hill City Youth Football and Cheerleading Board, rebuilding a youth football and cheerleading team. Public Service is an important part of my life and I will continue my service as a Lynchburg City councilwoman. Please visit tweedyforcouncil.com.

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