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Description of Honors Seminars

What sets an Honors seminar apart from a regular general education class?

Honors seminars are smaller, ranging from about 10-30 students. This arrangement allows for more discussion-based learning and gives students the opportunity to really get to know each other and their professor.

While most Honors seminars have a slightly heavier workload, the real difference lies in emphasis. For example, some Honors Theology seminars expound on a particular theological issue for most of the semester in addition to the general information covered in other basic theology classes. Honors Speech may cover certain principles of rhetoric applied to public speaking, and an Honors History class could discuss a book about a particular person or event.

Beyond the basic course requirements of non-honors sections, Honors sections and the professors that teach them take time to explore, in-depth, the many facets of the concepts covered, providing a rich and memorable educational experience for the students involved.

To challenge their students to go above and beyond the status quo, most professors teaching Honors class sections will either require a more extensive project (i.e., a 9-10 page paper instead of a 5-7) or have additional project or book assigned that is not required in their other sections. Typically, the work load depends on the professor and on how much the student is willing to apply himself or herself to the subject at hand.