News and Events

From Liberty to military leader

   
MSG. Gunzelman sharing his experiences in military leadership

During the winter intensives, the School of Business welcomed LU alumni, Master Sergeant (MSG) Will Gunzelman.  MSG Gunzelman served for 23 years in the U.S. Army, 20 of which was in Special Forces, more commonly known as “Green Berets”. He was born in Ohio and grew up in North Texas. His career began as a corrections officer with the Sheriff’s Department before he enlisted in the Army as an interrogator in 1989.  

Will Gunzelman has served as an interrogator, Special Forces Communications Sergeant, Special Forces Intelligence Sergeant, Special Forces Master Sergeant, and a lead advisor to both U.S. and foreign military government leaders. He has served in Afghanistan, completed several tours in Iraq, and also served in Bosnia, Africa, and throughout the Middle East. 

He has earned various awards including: The Special Forces tab, The Combat Infantryman badge, Military Free Fall Parachutist badge, Master Parachutist badge, Air Assault badge, and several awards for leadership in combat including an award for valor. He has an Associate degree in Criminal Justice, a Bachelor of Science in Liberal Arts, and an MBA in International Business from Liberty University.
 


 

Mr. Gunzelman presented to the Business capstone intensive the different types of leadership, while incorporating his faith and personal experiences from his time in the service. He highlighted different tenets and characteristics that are vital to effective leadership. He included lessons learned about leadership and how leadership starts in the home. One point he emphasized to students, that they should keep in perspective was, “If no one is going to lose life, limb, or eyesight, it can be fixed—don’t become overly stressed.” 

In addition, MSG Gunzelman shared that Special Operations Forces can defend America, but as future Christian business leaders, “the future of America rests on your shoulders.” Leaving the students with something to think about, Mr. Gunzelman closed his presentation by reminding the class that “it’s not what you do…It’s what you do after.”